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Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



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THE 




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POUURY KEEPER 




Page Number 2 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



^IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 



I Perfect Egg Shipping Boxes 

- FOR PARCEL POST AND EXPRESS SHIPMENTS. 

■EE Manufactured to meet the requirements of Parcel Post and Express (new ruling, when gross weight of 
5j± box and contents does not exceed 25 pounds.) 

Have been on the Market for 12 years and are Used and Recommended by Thousands of Poultrymen and 
• Experiment Poultry Farms. 




A Complete 1 5-Egg Size 

Note Place for Customer's Address 



OUR GUARANTEE 

is that Perfect Egg Boxes 
are the best constructed 
and most up-to-date boxes 
for the safe shipment of 
fancy hatching eggs by 
parcel post or express or 
MONEY REFUNDED. 

Eggs may be shipped 
thousands of miles with- 
out breakage or danger 
from heat or cold. 




Construction and Prices of Perfect Egg Shipping Boxes 



Are made of strong corrugated paper, with double faced 
corrugated paper partitions which have cushion effect, which 
protects each egg. Shipped knocked down flat and take low- 
est express or freight rate. Box when set up looks like pic- 
ture. The top, bottom and sides are double lined, with 
double wall of corrugated paper, the top flap fits in place and 



covers the eggs, and fits into the square tube, making a 4- 
wall cushion protection, thus preventing any chance of eggs 
being broken or chilled in shipment. A glance at box ought 
to convince you that it is made on the right principle. Can 
be packed ready for shipment in one minute. 



— ■ Prices and Weights, Perfect Egg Boxes, F. O. B. Factory, Southern Illinois. 



1 to 9 dz. 10 to 24 dz. 
of 1 size of 1 size 



25 to 99 dz. Wt. 1st and 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 

of 1 size per dz. Zone Zone Zone Zone Zone 

§1.65 dz. $1.50 dz. 15 1b. $1.95 $2.15 $2.40 $2.70 $3.00 

2.40 dz. 2.25 dz. 231b. 2.80 3.15 3.50 3.95 

3.25 dz. 3.15 dz. 35 1b. 3.90 4.25 4.95 5.65 

5.25 dz. 5.00 dz. 

No. 110 — 100 egg size, is too large to mail. 
Special Notice. — The boxes are packed in one dozen lots in cardboard containers. We do not break packages. Sample 
one- setting box, postpaid, 50 cents. We ship egg boxes by parcel post only when sufficient postage is remitted with order. 



No. 70 — 1 setting, 15 egg size.... $1.75 dz. 

No. 80 — 2 setting, 30 egg size 2.50 dz. 

No. 90 — 50 egg size 3.45 dz. 

No. 110 — 100 egg size 5.50 dz. 



Prices per dozen, Postpaid. 



1 Improved 'Sav-AlP — 



J CORRECTLY VENTILATED 



— Day Old Chick Boxes 



NON-CROWDING 

Manufactured to meet requirements of Parcel Post and Express Ruling, when gross wt. of box and con- 
tents does not exceed 25 lbs. 

For Cold, Hot, Mild or Warm Weather Parcel Post or Express Shipments. 

' — ^ Construction. "Sav-All" Boxes are constructed of heavy, tough, corrugated 

card board and can be given the required ventilation needed during cold, hot, mild 
fdfl||HHHR£.''V». or warm weather, without danger of the chicks being smothered or chilled. The 

box dividers are held in place with wire clips. Sides and bottom is made of one 
piece and folds together and is clamped with wire clips, no cracks in bottom, cover 
is separate and fits over top. The cover is made of one piece, which is neatly 
printed, with space for your name and address, as well as customer's. Note 
one dividing partition being one-half inch lower permits indirect ventilation in 
all parts of box. 

"Sav-AH" Chick Boxes have met the approval of the International Baby Chick 
Association, which is a guarantee that chicks shipped in them are well protected. 
The Strongest, Neatest and Best Constructed Box Made for Shipment of Day Old 
Chicks by Mail or Express. Our Guarantee — Money Returned if boxes are other 
than we claim. 

Beware of the Higher Cost of the Lower Price of Inferior Constructed Boxes 




V/e Do Not Claim to Make the Cheapest Chick or Egg Boxes, 

but we do claim and prove by customers using "Sav-All" 
Boxes that they prove the cheapest, as chicks and eggs ship- 
ped in them arrive in a better condition than if shipped in 
an inferior made box. 

We ship boxes by pai'cel post only when sufficient postage 
is remitted with order. Your postmaster can give you in- 
formation as to zone and charges. 



All Prices F. O. B. Factory, Southern Illinois. 

1 to 9 dz. 10 to 24 dz. Wt. per 
of 1 size of 1 size dz. 

No. 25 — 25 Chick Size $1.25 dz. $1.10 dz. 16 1b. 

No. 50 — 50 Chick Size 1.75 dz. 1.55 dz. 24 lb. 

No. 100 — 100 Chick Size 2.40 dz. 2.15 dz. 40 lb. 

All px-iees quoted are subject to change. Packed in bundles 
of 1 dozen each. We do not break bundles. Sample 25 chick 
size box, postpaid, 50c, furnished upon request. 



Address all orders and remittances to 



Send your order TODAY 

Eureka Supply House, 3 Wesley Ave., Mount Morris, 111. 



THE 




A JOURNAL FOR 
EVERYONE 
I KITE R EST ED 




KEEPER 



I N M A K I N G 
POULTRY 
PAY 



Vol. XXXIX 



APRIL, 1922 



No. 1 



Poultry Building On The Farm 

By F. RAYMOND BENSON 



Each year the farmer had prom- 
ised his wife that he would build her 
a suitable place in which to keep her 
flock but each year he had put it 
off for one reason or another. So 
we are going to give the good wife 
a few pointers in the hope that she 
can influence friend husband to put 
up that poultry house this year. 

First of all a house should be built 
with an idea to the end for which it 
is to be used. The commercial egg 
plants needs a different house than 
the broiler plant. Of course one may 
make an old granary over into a 
poultry house but it is always best 
to build it according to the best ideas 
of those who have had experience 
along this line. Above all, the house 
must be dry. Dampness is absolutely 
a danger to poultry and the house 
must be so constructed and located 
that it will be dry at all times of 
the year, especially during the cold 
winter days, when the frost wants to 
collect on the walls. It should have 
an abundance of light and sunshine 
for the laying of eggs is determined 
in no small degree by the length of 
day, and a dark house means a short 
day and fewer eggs. Plenty of sun- 
shine has a tendancy to prevent di- 
sease as it is a well known fact that 
many germs turn up on their back 
when a ray of sunshine gets hold of 
them. Like many other things in 
life they cannot stand light. Venti- 
lation is essential to success. Madam 
hen must keep up her vigor in order 
to keep shelling out the eggs and a 
hen needs more fresh air than most 
other animals. Fresh air is very im- 
portant. The house should be so 
constructed that it can easily be kept 
clean. Cleanliness is a factor in egg 
production winter or summer. The 
house must be free from drafts and 
not subject to sudden changes in 
temperature. To sum it all up in a 
word, a poultry house must be com- 
fortable. If the hen feels at ease 
and has her every wish gratified — 
then eggs will come in abundance 
and after all that is the aim that 
the average farmer is keeping poul- 
try for and the reason for a new 



poultry house — to obtain more eggs. 
As we have just said it is often true 
that it seems best to convert an old 
building over into a poultry house 
and in that case the best that can 
be done is to keep these ideas in 
mind and do the best you can. It 
may be possible to produce a quite 
satisfactory house but as a general 
rule built-over buildings are not very 
satisfactory. If a new building can 
be constructed, it is by all means the 
best thing to do. 

Many a poultry farmer has failed 
and if he but knew the reason it 
might be summed up in one word. 
Location of the poultry house. The 
location of the house is almost as 
important as any fact with which the 
would-be builder has to contend. The 
house should be placed on a well- 
drained piece of ground and often 
the slope of a hill is better than a flat 
plot. Water from rains must drain 
off from around the house and leave 
the yards dry. Moisture is not at all 
desirable and never loose sight of 
the fact that a dry house is of the 
utmost importance. In locating a 
poultry house it is always well to 
place it conveniently near the other 



buildings as it saves time and in bad 
weather is quite an advantage. It 
should be placed far enough away 
so that in case of fire that it will 
not be in danger. Always face the 
house to the south so that the 
amount of winter sunshine may he 
as great as possible. A southern ex- 
posure is so well nigh universal that 
we need but suggest it. A windy 
place is not advisable owing to the 
fact that cold winter winds will have 
to be contended with but if there 
seems to be no alternative — then 
plant trees about the house and give 
it as much protection as possible. We 
have seen this done and really it is 
surprising how much wind a few 
trees can break. 

There are two general ideas in this 
housing problem. One may adopt 
the colony or separate flock house or 
the long or continuous house. Then 
again the colony house is divided in- 
to two plans — the portable and non- 
portable. The portable has runners 
and can be drawn about the farm 
from one place to another by a team 
of horses. This plan permits the 
houses to be drawn into the fields 
and much feed will be eaten by the 




Page Number 4 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



fowls which is found on the ground 
and which would otherwise be lost, 
so in reality it saves quite a bit of 
feed. It also gives the fowls access 
to the insects and this is a valuable 
addition to the ration of any flock. 
Being moved about so often the 
ground about the house is unusually 
fresh and free from contamination 
and this results in less sickness and 
disease. Its greatest draw-back is 
the added cost of construction and 
the extra work needed to go about 
caring for the fowls. During the sum- 
mer the coops are in the fields but 
during the winter it is usual to draw 
them up near the other buildings. 
This makes the care of the fowls 
much easier and saves many an ex- 
tra step. The non-portable is a great 
deal the same as the portable but 
has a fixed place of location. 

The long or continuous house has 
found many friends owing to the fact 
that the first cost to build is much 
lower than the colony coop. The 
amount of labor in caring for the 
fowls is greatly lessened and no one 
can fail to appreciate this feature on 
a stormy winter day. But is seems 
that no housing plan is perfect and 
each has its short-comings. The con- 
tinuous house increases the danger 
from disease. It also increases bad 
habits such as egg eating and feather 
pulling. Almost all long houses have 
bad drafts and solid partitions must 
be built at regular intervals in order 
to overcome this trouble. Given prop- 
er care in the biulding this style 
house makes quite a satisfactory 
coop. 

No matter what style house you 
may adopt as best fitting your indi- 
vidual needs, it is imperative that 
you make some arrangement to se- 
cure proper ventilation. Fresh air 
is as important as proper food and 
you cannot hope for success in the 
poultry business unless you supply 
an abundance of good, clean, fresh 
air to the fowls. No draft should be 
allowed under any circumstances. 
The fowls must be protected from 
cold winds laden with snow. Venti- 
lation does not mean to open up a 
window and let it go at that. Such 
a procedure would result in a damp 
house where proper ventilation will 
give the opposite result. There are 
really three means of ventilation. 
One of the oldest ways to get foul 
air out of a house and pure air in. 




is by the use of a ventilator. This 
may be made of metal or wood but 
the idea is the same — to change the 
air in the house. This has met with 
success in some places and then again 
it has proven a flat failure, so we do 
not feel justified in saying that it 
will prove entirely satisfactorily. The 
muslin curtain in place of a window 
has gone a long way in helping solve 
this difficult problem but the cloth 
must be swept off occasionally to 
admit a maximum amount of air, 
otherwise it fails to change the air 
as per the plan. When a curtain is 
working properly it takes about one 
square foot of curtain to eacn fifteen 
square feet of floor space. During 
the last few weeks a new means of 
ventilation has appeared whic.u seems 
to give quite satisfactorily results. 
We say it is a new idea and yet that 
is hardly a fact for it is fashioned 
after the old style wooden shutter. 
Being made of lath it is cheaply con- 
structed and it really is quite an im- 
provement. No doubt you have seen 
them and know what tney are. It 
is usually best to allow about one 
square foot of baffler to twenty 
square feet of floor space. 

The modern "window is indeed a 
great help to civilization but perhaps 
it is fully as beneficial to our poul- 
try. We need light and plenty of it. 
Allow one square foot of window 
space to each ten or twelve square 




feet of floor space. We recommend 
that all glass be uniform in size so 
that replacement may be simplified. 
S"xlO" or 10"xl2" are the sizes most 
used. It would be an excellent plan 
to use the same sizes in all farm 
buildings so far as possible. The 
windows should be rbout two feet 
from the floor and perhaps a foot 
from the plate, depending somewhat 
on the size and style of the house. 
All windows should be made to open 
easily and if they open down from 
the top it will prevent drafts to quite 
an extent. It would be well to cover 
window space with fine wire to keep 
out sparrows and other pests. Be 
sure to clean the glass occasionally 
so as to give the full benefit of the 
windows. 

One of the questions most asked 
is, "What size house should I build?" 
That can be answered by finding the 
number of fowls which will be kept 
in the house. The main thing is not 
to crowd the birds. For a flock of 
fifty fowls we would suggest that 
each fowl should be given four 
square feet of floor space. It is 
better to give a little too much rath- 
er than too little room. As the flock 
decreases in size the amount of floor 
space needed per bird must increase. 
On many farms where the poultry 
has a free run, the size of the house 
is not so important in tne summer 
but when winter comes be sure the 
house is not crowded. A wide house 
is usually cheaper to build than a 
narrow one. Fourteen feet deep 
should be the minimum and sixteen 
feet would be better. 

There are four styles of roofs in 
common use and it seems that dif- 
ferent parts of the country are par- 
tial to different roofs. Perhaps the 
shed roof is the most common and 
easiest to build. It has the advant- 
age of being cheap and this must be 
taken into consideration. It turns 
all the water to the north, away from 
the south yards and gives a warm 
coop. It has so many advantages 
that it will continue to be used as 
long as poultry is kept. The combi- 
nation roof is a cross between a shed 
and a gable roof. It is used quite 
largely in wide houses, the gable be- 
ing built one-third of the way back 
from the front. It is quite warm and 
a very good roof for houses fourteen 
or more feet wide. The gable roof, 



commonly known as the peak roof is 
not as popular now as it was years 
ago. The plate must be too high to 
admit sunshine, resulting in a cold 
house. The best plan is to ceil such 
a house at the plate, placing the 
boards about one inch apart and then 
place a foot of straw on top of these 
boards. This will remedy dampness 
and make it warmer. A window cut 
in each gable end will help to keep 
the straw dry. Much has been said 
of the semi-monitor style roof and 
it certainly has many advantages. It 
reduces the air space, admits sun- 
shine to the rear of the house and 
is warmer. But for the long house 
it is too low in front to be entirely 
satisfactory. It is difficult to clean 
and expensive to build. Modifica- 
tions of it have been used and quite 
successfully. 

For the foundation nothing equals 
a good cement wall. It should be 
well built and be at least one foot 
above the surrounding ground. This 
will insure drainage. By all means 
make it rat proof. 

Fowls enjoy dirt floors but they 
must be higher than the surrounding 
ground to make them dry. The lit- 
ter will need to be changed often to 
keep it sanitary. Board floors are 
dry and quite satisfactory except 
they allow a nice place for rats. Ce- 
ment is durable but cold and must 
be covered with sand and litter. 

The walls are constructed with the 
idea of keeping the rain, snow and 
cold winds away from the fowls. Ce- 
ment or cement blocks are usually 
too costly and often are damp. Drop 
siding seems to be about the best ma- 
terial available. Some houses are 
constructed of rough lumber and 
covered with tar paper but in the 
end we think this is penny wise and 
pound foolish. 

Roofing paper is used for roofs as 
they are usually rather flat. On 
roofs of good slope composition 
shingles are better but cost more. 
Wooden shingles are not recom- 
mended. 

Partitions should be made solid for 
about two feet from the floor, this 
will prevent the males fighting. The 
upper part may be made of wire. 
Solid partitions should be construct- 
ed at intervals in long houses to pre- 
vent drafts. Doors in the partitions 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 

should be in a straight line and dou- 
ble action hinges permit the doors 
to swing either way which is a de- 
cided advantage to the one who cares 
for the flock. The roosts should be 
on the level and placed in the warm 
est part of the house, which is usu- 
ally the back side. If they are re- 
movable, so much the better. For 
small fowls six inches of roosting 
space is allowed for each fowl but 
with the larger breeds it is best to 
alow eight inches to each bird. The 
roosts should be placed about four- 
teen inches from the back wall to 
prevent damaging the plumage. It 
is also a good plan to place the roosts 
about twelve to fourteen inches apart 
for the same reason. A dropping 
board is placed under the roosts and 
should be so arranged that it may 
be easily cleaned. Some poultrymen 
hinge the dropping boards and let 
them drop down out of the way dur- 
ing the day. Nests must be of easy 
access, dark and about twelve to 
fourteen inches square with fourteen 
inches of head room. Provide one 
nest to each three or four hens. 

Economy is usually the watch- 
word in poultry house construction 
on the farm and that is well, but 
see to it that none of the essentials 
are overlooked. The house must be 
comfortable for the fowls and yet 
convenient to the caretaker. It must 
not be elaborate or a waste of money 
would result and yet it must have 
all the facilities for caring for the 
needs of the fowls. In the end it is 
poor economy to buy poor lumber or 
for that matter anything which en- 
ters into a poultry house. Buy good 
material, build it as well as you 
know how, without any of the frills 
and you will find in the years to 
come that it will be a real saving. 

Lumber and all materials enter- 
ing into the construction of a poul- 
try house are much cheaper now than 
they have been for some time. 
Whether they will go lower we can- 
not say but the fact remains that 
they are getting down so much near- 
er the normal figure that should you 
be really in need of a poultry house, 
we doubt the wisaom of delaying its 
construction longer. It will be worth 
much to you to have the use of a 
good poultry house. 



Page Number 5 
ILLINOIS STATE FAIR 



The next Illinois State Fair will 
be held a month later than last year, 
the dates being September 16th to 
2 3rd. We want to make it a quality 
show clear through. Due to the lim- 
ited amount of floor space in the 
poultry building, a rule has been 
adopted restricting the entering of 
poultry by any exhibitor to 3 varie- 
ties. You can enter as many speci- 
mens as you desire in each variety 
of the 3 you wish, but no more. 
This rule does not apply to Turkeys, 
Waterfowls, Bantams or Rabbits, but 
entries for poultry for more than 3 
varieties from any exhibitor will not 
be accepted. This will eliminate the 
carload man but it cannot be helped 
as it is impossible to build a suitable 
poultry building at present. We have 
no doubt we will get it in the future 
and then we will be able to lift the 
rule. The Illinois State Poultry As- 
sociation would like to have all live 
specialty clubs in Illinois to hold their 
summer meeting at this fair, they 
can get their members to send their 
best specimens and at their meeting 
can have the judges go over the win- 
ners with the club. It will help both 
the members and the judges. Lots 
of good was accomplished at the last 
State fair by the Red club along the 
above lines and we believe it will help 
all clubs the same way. 

The enormous number of people 
visiting the poultry building makes 
it an ideal place to start your fall 
showing and we doubt if a better 
place to sell your surplus males and 
females exists in Illinois. 

Get in touch with your club secre- 
tary and have him get up a rousing- 
meeting of your members at the 
State fair. 

We hope to have the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Washington, D. 
C, send there full poultry display to 
the fair and the newly created De- 
partment of Poultry Husbandry of 
the Department of Agriculture will 
have their bulletins and want to meet 
all breeders of poultry if possible. 

Put September 16 to 2 3 or your 
lists and make up your mind to show 
a few real good ones there. — A. D. 
Smith, Sec, Quincy, 111. 





T „„ „,„„„.. ,,„, v( . the ECtoherv on the Halhvorthv Poultry Farm. Box 105, Elyria, Ohio. Mr. H. H. Hall, the proprietor, is making a specialty of 

nnt^ Z e t^^Z,,^i S C White Leghorn baby chicks, ' although he also furnishes all of the better known varieties. Descriptive catalog of 
this plant will be mafled to all who are interested without obligation. 



Page Number 6 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



POULTRY KEEPER 

Quincy, Illinois 
401 Hampshire Street 
A Journal for Everyone Interested in Making 
Poultry Pay. 
Issued the First of Each Month 

Subscription Price : 
50c a year; Single Copies, 5c 
Foreign Postage: Twenty- five Cents a Year 
Additional. 

Entered at the Quincy, El., Post Office as 
Second Class Matter. 

Remittances should tie made by Draft, Money 
Order, Express Order or Registered Letters. 
Small sums will be accepted in United States 
one or two cent postage stamps. 

Change of address — When this is desired, be 
sure to give old and new Post Office addresses. 

All subseribtions invariably discontinued at 
expiration. Subscribers will confer a favor by 
reporting- to us irregularities in receiving the 
Poultry Keeper. 

Advertising rates made known on application. 

Poultry Keeper readers are cordially invited 
to express their opinion on any subject of 
poultry that will be of interest to our readers, 
give helpful talks to the inexperienced and ask 
questions in any department. 

A. OTIS ARNOLD, Editor. 

F. RAYMOND BENSON, Ass't Editor. 



■ HE PUBLISHER OK THIS 

MAGAZINE IS A 

LIFE MEMBER OF THE 

American Poultry Association 



POULTRY INTEREST IN THE 
SOUTHLAND 




We feel greatly gratified when we 
hear so many glowing reports from 
the South. The good news is com- 
ing constantly and it indicates that 
our good Southern friends appreciate 
the value of poultry more and more 
and we predict that ten years from 
now will see many wonderful poultry 
plants in the South. 

In many parts of this section the 
soil and climate are almost ideal for 
poultry. In fact one of the draw- 
backs has been the ease with which 
poultry could be raised. But educa- 
tion and experience have done much 
to overcome this and the South is 
being dotted with successful poultry 
plants. 

We believe in time that early broil- 
ers will be largely shipped to our 
Northern markets from Southern 
poultry farms and this makes a spec- 
ialty well worthy of careful investi- 
gation. Fowls for our early fall 
shows will also be reared in the 
South. This is done to some extent 
at present. 

The future of the South is ex- 
tremely promising and we are glad 
to see our friends are meeting the 
problem with much interest. 



THE ODD BREEDS 



Almost every week we receive a 
request for the address of a breeder 
of some odd breed. Last week it 
was a lady who wanted Buff Cochins 
and this week it was Black Turkeys. 
We call these odd breeds because 
they are not bred so extensively. 

Those of our readers who breed 
these out-of-the-ordinary breeds will 
do well to run an ad in POULTRY 
KEEPER. If you have but a limited 
amount of stock to sell, use a classi- 
fied ad. The main idea is to place 
your name before our readers and 
keep it before them. 

How are folks to know that you 
raise Gray Call Ducks or Buttercups 



it you don't tell them? Don't fool 
yourself into thinking that a reader 
is going to hunt through a lot of 
back numbers to find your ad. He 
will write to someone whose ad he 
sees. If he writes to us we will 
give him the name of our advertisers 
but suppose you have never adver- 
tised — how can we give him your 
name? 

A real opportunity is present and 
the cost of a classified ad for a year 
won't break you and it will probably 
bring you many a good order. Profit 
comes from sales and sales result 
from advertising. 

Don't lay this aside but write out 
your ad and mail it today. Get in 
the game and get your share of busi- 
ness. 



BEES ARE PROFIT MAKERS 

It was a number of years ago when 
the writer was about ten years of age 
that he went with father to see a 
neighbor who kept bees. Well, as 
youngsters will, we got mixed up 
with the bees and we certainly broke 
all speed records that day. But in 
the back of the buggy (autos were 
not used then) we took home some 
honey and in spite of our experiences 
with the bees we did our full duty 
to that honey. What is nicer than 
a cake of clear honey, made right at 
home and at small cost? 

While you poultrymen keep an eye 
open for profits on your poultry, yet 
you are missing something, if you 
don't keep bees. They are a source 
of real profit. With all the facilities 
and knowledge that we have today 
it is not as risky as when we were 
young. 

If you have fruit it is imperative 
that you keep bees. Don't forget that 
next winter when the snow is deep 
and the wind is howling that this 
honey will taste mighty good. 



THE PRICE OF EGGS 

Many of our readers have written 
to inquire why the bottom seemed to 
drop out of the egg market. To all 
appearances there was no reason for 
this sudden drop. 

As near as we can ascertain there 
was an immense quantity of Chinese 
eggs placed on sale in Chicago. 

You cannot produce eggs as cheap- 
ly as these eggs were for the simple 
reason that no self-respecting Amer- 
ican citizen would allow such condi- 
tions to exist and someone probably 
made some money out of the deal at 
the expense of our poultrymen. 

This condition gives you a taste of 
what is going to happen unless Con- 
gress does something to protect the 
poultry industry. We have mentioned 
before the lack of sanitation in 
China and either we must stop these 
eggs from coming into this country 
or you will have to produce eggs at 
a lower cost. 

It has been suggested that it would 
be an excellent idea to compel res- 
taurants to display a notice to the 
effect that they used Chinese eggs. 
If this were done it would place the 
domestic egg and the imported egg 
in two separate classes — it would re- 
move competition. 

This whole proposition is very 
vital and you should do all possible 
to secure such laws as will protect 
our poultrymen. Self preservation 
is our first law. 




Dr. David Roberts 
Poultry Tablets 

A combination of sulphocarbolates of 
calcium.sodium and zinc for the treat- 
ment and prevention of White Diar- 
rhea and all intestinal infections of 
baby chicks, as well as poultry in all 
stages of life and productivity. Drink- 
ing water for poultry should be medi- 
cated to overcome and prevent disease. 
The annual poultry loss by disease is 
stupendous---over 50 per cent. 

Save Your Chicks 

Serve in fresh water. Aids digestion. 
Permits food to nourishthem through 
their babyhood, the non-productive 
period when hardy bone and strong 
muscle is needed to give them a good 
start in their race for the laying period. 
They will reward you manyfold later 
on. Give them proper protection and 
you will find there is big money in 
poultry. Sold in tablet form. 

50 Tablets 50 Cents 

Poultry will drink when too sicktoeat. 
Baby chick organs are peculiarly sensi- 
tive. They need something to ward off 
disease, particularly that most dreaded 
and destructive disease white diarrhea. 

A Tablet A Day 
Keeps Disease Away 

One package, 50 tablets, enough to 
medicate 50 gallons of water, a most 
effective andeconomical preventive, for 
only one cent a gallon. Use Dr. 
David Roberts Poultry Tonic, Louse 
Powder, Poultry Cholera Medicine, 
Poultry Roup Paste and Disinfectall, 
all known and tried prescriptions. 
Sold by our druggist, dealer, or direct. 

Dr. David Roberts Practical Home Veteri- 
narian, a veterinary doctor book, regularprice 
$1 .00, tells you how to treat your own poul- 
try, also describes our 44 prescriptions — a 
prescription for every animal ailment. Wo 
will tell you how to get it FREE. 

Our Special Introductory 

Offer Send 25 cents, just one-half the 
regular price, for one package Dr. 
David Roberts Poultry Tablets, sent 
you postpaid, providing you give us 
the name of your druggist or dealer. 

DR. DAVID ROBERTS 
VETERINARY CO. 

135 Grand St., Waukesha, Wis. 1 



Drinking 



1 To Their 

Health W TP 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 7 



SUNSHINE WILL KILL 
GERMS 



HATCH EARLY FALL WIN- 
NERS NOW 



Many problems of disease which 
come from poultry keepers have 
their start in the presence of germs. 
Disease comes as a result of these 
germs being in the intestines or per- 
haps the throat. The problem is to 
remove these germs and keep the 
premises free from them. 

Spraying the hen house with zen- 
oleuin of any other good disinfectant 
is an effective means to this end, 
especially when a dangerous disease 
gets started but spraying the coop be- 
fore the ferms get busy is locking 
the barn before instead of after the 
attempted robbery. 

The spraying of the coop is very 
useful and the cost is not heavy and 
yet poultrymen are searching for a 
more effective means of fighting di- 
sease. Often while we search in for- 
eign lands for a remedy, we have 
one right at hand. So it is in this 
particular case. 

Sunshine is a most potent remedy 
for disease. Germs are killed by its 
piercing rays and if poultrymen 
would only let more of this so easily 
procured remedy into their poultry 
houses, how much less disease there 
would be. What a loss would be 
saved and how much more profit 
would be made. Sunshine is the ene- 
my of disease and we should use it 
more freely. Perhaps its very cheap- 
ness has been one of the reasons we 
have neglected it. But wise men 
know that nature's means of destroy- 
ing germs is after all the best. So 
let us have light and sunshine, more 
and more. 



WATER AND EGGS 

An egg is composed of a large 
amount of water. This can be prov- 
en in any High School Chemistry 
class. If the egg is so largely com- 
posed of water, then it follows that 
water is absolutely necessary in or- 
der to produce eggs. This is exactly 
the case and we heard D. E. Hale 
tell how he was able to detect the 
cause of a laying slump in the low 
consumption of water by the hens. 

A hen to be a heavy layer must be 
a heavy drinker. She must drink 
large quantities of water. Men like 
Hale who delve into the whys and 
wherefores of things have proven 
this. 

A constant supply of water easily 
available is of utmost importance. If 
the water is always near at hand, a 
hen will take a few sips often and in 
the end will have consumed a large 
quantity of water. Not only must 
the water be easily secured but it 
must be clean and pure. A hen does 
not like to drink dirty water but 
from necessity she is often forced to 
do so. Warm water in winter and 
cool water in summer will induce a 
hen to drink more. An abundance 
of water of the right temperature 
will do much to increase the egg pro- 
duction. It may require a little ex- 
tra time to attend to this matter but 
the extra number of eggs you will 
get will more than repay you for the 
trouble. 



This is the time of the year when 
the winners at the early fall shows 
will be hatched. Your pens have 
been mated with all the skill you 
possess and now it is up to you to 
hatch as many chicks as possible, so 
that your chance of raising as many 
winners as possible will be better. 
With the American breeds the early 
winners will have to be hatched this 
month and the Mediterraneans will 
have to be gotten out not later than 
next month. Of course the later 
shows will require later chicks but 
don't forget that the early chicks are 
wanted this month without fail. 

Look to their care the first few 
weeks and above all things keep 
them growing. A stunted bird is 
about the worst proposition of all. 
Keep them growing at all costs. 



It pays to welcome newcomers, 
whether to the neighborhood or to 
the farm flock and herd. The right 
kind of a welcome when they arrive 
usually helps them do their best 
later. 



Bigge 




st Hatches 

Strong Chicks 

That's what you'll get with a Cham- 
pion Belle City Hatching Outfit. My 
Free Book"Hatching Facts" tells 
how— gives newest ideas and Quick- 
est ways to make poultry pay big with my 
$1 O— 1 40-Egg Champion 

I Q Belle City Incubator 

Double Walls Fibre Board— Hot-Water Cop- 
per Tank— Self-Regulated Safety Lamp — 
Thermometer & Holder— Egg Tester— Deep 
Nursery. $7.95 buys 140-Chick Both or>i» 
Hot-Water Double-Walled Brooder »19_ 

Express Prepaid East of Rockies 

I Bhlp quick from Buffalo. Min- 
neapolis, KaOBaa City or Racine. 
With this Guaranteed 
Hatching Outfit and my 
Guide Book for setting 
up and operating you can 
make a bis income. You 
can also easily share in my 

$1000 in Gold 

Without cost or obliga- 
tion. Save time-Order 
Now— or write today 
for my Free Book, 
"HatchingFacts" 
It tells the whole i 
story.-Jim Rohan, Pres. 

Belle City Incubator Co.. Box 145 Racine, Wis. 




Gardening is fun, but authoritative 
information helps to get results. 



Raise ALL 
Your Chicks 



After the trouble and expense ^ 
of hatching good chicks, you want to 
raise them all — into heavy layers and husky 
breeders. It's a lot cheaper to raise them than to 
replace them even if you had the time. So take no 
chances — give them the start that will make them sturdy and 
keep them growing — feed them the original, dependable 
y "baby food for baby chicks" — 

Pratts Buttermilk Baby Chick Food 

Should be fed for the critical first three to six weeks, because it 
contains exactly what the delicate little bodies need, for building 
bone, muscle and feather. Start with the first meal and count 
on it for results in husky, well-developed youngsters that will 
continue to grow to profitable maturity. 

Used every season by thousands of successful chick raisers, 
because it raises the chicks, relieves you of danger, worry and 
loss. Depend upon it for your chicks — try it at our risk. 

'Koar Money Back If YOU Are Not Satisfied" 

Ask the nearest Pratt dealer. 

"J 1 /, PRATT FOOD CO., Philadelphia, Chicago, Toronto 

The answer to rapid growth and 
W£ heavy egg production — Pratts new 
Growing and Laying Mashes 

PRATTS 5Q3 YEAR OF SERVICE 



Page Number 8 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



RELIABLE 

Standard 

Incubator 



It is today as it was at the beginning, 41 
years ago — the leader of them all. In 
every way first class; best materials are 
used; best workmanship. Double heating 
system; maintains uniform temperature 
with a constant circulation of pure air. 
Has ample nursery space. Like all 
Reliable Poultry Appliances and Equip- 
ment it is sold upon honor and gives 
absolute satisfaction. 

The Reliable Standard 
Blue Flame Wickless Oil 
Heated Colony Hover 

the latest achievement and a dominant leader. 
It is made right, works right; automatically 
controlled: flame adjustable to heat required. 
Chicks have fresh air and even temperature. 
Our canopies are Bhipped complete, not 
knocked down. They are ready to attach legs 
and operate. 

RELIABLE COAL BURNING BROODER 
universally recognized the best. Burns either 
hard or soft coal. Self heating; easily cleaned; 
economical; gives steady, automatically regu- 
lated heat. Our positive money-back guaran- 
tee applies to all Reliable Incubators, Brooders, 
Hovers, Poultry Appliances and Equipment. 

Tf there is not a Reliable ^dealer in 
your locality, write us for Sales Book. 



i Ridable Incubator i. Brooder- Co 

. BOX 15 QUINCY, ILL. U.S.A. 



Reliable bee 



V 



A 




50 to 
110O 
EEgs 



J.W. Myers. Tres. 



RHODE ISLAND REDS 



Best All Purpose Breed 

' They'll make you more money than 
,any other poultry breed. Egg laying 
contests show Rhode Island Reds lay 
more winter eggs, larger eggs, than 
any other breed. They mature quick, 
begin laying early. Rhode Island Reds 
combine egg and meat qualities in 
highest possible degree. Make best 
market fowls. Hens make excellent 
mothers. Most beautiful, most popu- 
lar breed today. Ideal fowl for farm 
or city lot. We tell you where to buy 

Rhode Island Red Journal E&iTSS&StfZ 

Khode Island Reds. Tells how to make big money with them 

-now to buy, sell, get greatest pleasure, most profit — 
everything you want to know about Rhode Island Reds. 
Published monthly. SOc year— 3 years $1.00. 

Blue Ribbon Red3" remarkable book tells bow to judge, 
mate, cull, feed, prepare for show, linebreed. etc. Given 
free with 3-year subscription to Rhode Island Red Journal, 
at$1.00. Send dollar bill <»day. 

Rhode Island Red Journal. 5 1 1 1 E. Bremer Are. Warerlvlowa 




CHICKS WITH "PEP" 




Our bred-to lay and exhibition 
clucks will pay you. Try them 
and be convinced. Rocks, Beds, 
Leghorns, Orpingtons, Wyan- 
dottes, Anconas, Jlinorcas. 
Safe delivery guaranteed. Pre- 
paid. Prices right. Free catalog. 
HOLGATE CHICK HATCHEET 
Box K, Holgate, Ohio 



I 



SUCCESSFUL" 



: •>'£.'•' ORS 
and BROODERS 

Most successful made. Our guaranty, strongest 
ever written, would put us out of business if 
they weren't, and we're been .it it 29 jrarB. 
Poultry lessons FREE. Catalog free. Writenow. 

DKMoineslncubalo.-Co.K52u St. OesMoincs 




ILLINOIS EGG LAYING CONTEST 

Month of February 
AT MLRPHYSBORO, ILLINOIS 

Five Highest Pens in Mediterranean Class. 

Owner Address Variety Eggs 

Ward L. Hull, Roodhouse, Illinois, White Leghorns 9 5 

Northland Farms, Grand Rapids, Mich., White Leghorns 89 

Theo. Mallinckrodt, Marthasvilie, Mo., Brown Leghorns 86 

Johnson & Bowyer, Murphysboro, 111., Black Leghorns 7 9 

Sweet Briar Farms, Ontarioville, 111., Anconas 7 9 

L. E. Warren, Webster Groves, Mo., White Leghorns 77 

G. F. Kramper, St. Libory, 111., Blue Andalusians 77 

Five Highest lndividvnls in Mediterranean Class. 

Ward L. Hull Roodhouse, Illinois, White Leghorns . 2 7 

Ora Hanna, Murphysboro, 111., Brown Leghorns 23 

Sweet Briar Farms, Ontarioville, 111., Anconas 21 

Northland Farms, Grand Rapids, Mich., White Leghorns 2 0 

Grand View Farm, Zeeland, Mich., White Leghorns 20 

Sweet Briar Farms, Ontarioville, 111., Anconas 20 

Sweet Briar Farms, Ontarioville, 111., Anconas 20 

G. F. Kramper, St. Libory, 111., Blue Andalusians 20 

Theo. Mallinckrodt, Marthasvilie, Mo., Brown Leghorn 20 

Theo. Mallinckrodt, Marthasvilie, Mo., Brown Leghorn 2 0 

Ward L. Hull, Roodhouse, 111., White Leghorn 20 

Northland Farms, Grand Rapids, Mich., White Leghorn 19 

Northland Farms, Grand Rapids, Mich., White Leghorn 19 

Johnson & Bowyer, Murphysboro, 111., Black Leghorn 19 

Johnson & Bowyer, Murphysboro, 111., Black Leghorn 19 

H. E. Errett, Nevada, Missouri, Ancona- 19 

H. E. Errett, Nevada, Missouri, Ancona 19 

H. E. Errett, Nevada, Missouri, Ancona 19 

Muster & Graves, Murphysboro, 111., White Leghorn 19 

Sweet Briar Farm, Ontarioville, 111., White Leghorn 19 

Funk Egg Farm, Bloomington, 111., White Leghorn 19 

Funk Egg Farm, Bloomington, 111., White Leghorn 19 

Corn Belt Poultry Farm, Forrest, 111., White Leghorns 19 

Egyptian Poultry Farm, DuBois, 111., White Leghorn 19 

Five Highest Pens in American and English Classes. 

Paul W. Arndt, Murphysboro, 111., White Rocks 104 

Floyd Dauer, Murphysboro, 111., Buff Orpingtons 9 6 

John N. Braun, Red Bud, Illinois, Barred Rocks 9 6 

Miss Pearce, Springfield, 111., Rhode Island Reds 89 

Jules Francois, Westhampton Beach, Barred Rocks 89 

W. M. Denney, Murphysboro, 111., Rhode Island Reds 86 

Kenneth Pautler, Murphysboro, 111., Rhode Island Reds 84 

Tip Top Poultry Farm, Sullivan, 111.. White Wyandottes 84 

Five Highest Individuals in American and English Classes. 

Paul W. Arndt, Murphysboro, 111., White Rocks 2 4 

Mrs. P. W. Warner, Salem, 111., Barred Rock 24 

Paul W. Arndt, Murphysboro, 111., White Rock 2 3 

Paul W. Arndt, Murphysboro, 111., White Rock 2 3 

Leo Baumann, Highland, 111., White Wyandottes 2 3 

Jules Francois, Westhampton Beach, Barred Rock 2 3 

Harlem Graeff & Son, Murphysboro, 111., Barred Rock 2 3 

Rev. Sam Hensi.Higginsville, Mo., White Rock. 2 3 

J. W. Bilderback, Carbondale, 111., White Wyandotte 2 2 

Jules Francois, Westhampton Beach, Barred Rock 2 2 

John M. Braun, Red Bud, 111., Barred Rock 22 

Whistlecote Annex, Burksville, 111., White Rock 22 

Floyd Dauer, Murphysboro, 111., Buff Orpington — 22 

Prairie View Farm, St. Peters, 111.,. Rhode Island Red 22 

R. J. McElvain & Son. Murphysboro, 111., Rhode Island Red 22 

Miss Pearce, Springfield, 111., Rhode Island Red , — 21 

W. P. Skinner, Murphysboro, 111., Barred Rock 21 

Whistlecote Annex, Burksville, 111., White Rock 21 

Floyd Dauer, Murphysboro, 111., Buff Orpington — 21 

C. I. Wadkins, Carterville, 111., Barred Rock 21 

Mrs. R. N. Nesbit, Girard, 111., Buff Wyandotte 21 

W. M. Denney, Murphysboro, 111., Rhode Island Red 20 

W. J. Esger, Verona, 111., Rhode Island Red 20 

Leo Baumann, Highland. 111., White Wyandotte 20 

Tip Top Poultry Farm, Sullivan, 111., White Wyandotte 20 

Jules Francois, West Hampton Beach, Barred Rock 20 

John M. Braun, Red Bud. 111., Barred Rock 20 

John M. Braun, Red Bud, 111., Barred Rock - 20 

Rev. Sam Hensi, Higginsville, Mo., White Rock 20 

Paul W. Arndt, Murphysboro, 111., White Rock 20 

Floyd Dauer, Murphysboro, 111., Buff Orpington 2 0 

Francis Schilling, Waterloo, 111., Rhode Island White 2 0 

Prairie View Farm, St. Peters, 111., Rhode Island Red 20 

Kenneth Paulter, Murphysboro, 111., Rhode Island Red . 2 0 

QCI3VCY REPORT OF WINNERS 
Five Highest Pens in Mediterranean Class. 

Owner Address Variety Eggs 

John J. Nyenhuis, Hudsonville, Mich., White Leghorns 99 

Martin Rodstrom, Holdridge, Neb., White Leghorns 9 9 

F. W. Rubensaal, Rockford, 111., White Leghorns 97 

H. E. Heine, Lakewood, N. J., White Leghorns 9 6 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 9 



4 Northland Leghorn Farm, Grand Rapids, Mich., White Leghorns 

4 Harold Barclay, Wheaton, 111., White Leghorns 

5 Davidson W. L. Farm, West Alexander, Pa., White Leghorns 

Five Highest Individuals in Mediterranean Class. 

1 A. E. Davidson, Mt. Sterling, 111., White Leghorn 

2 Northland Leghorn Farm, Grand Rapids, Mich, White Leghorn 

3 Koyer Bros., Quincy, 111., White Leghorn 

4 Davidson W. L. Farm, West Alexander, Pa., White Leghorn 

4 Geo. Ghostley, Anoka, Minn., White Leghorn 

4 Martin Rodstrom, Holdredge, Neb., White Leghorn 

4 John J. Nyenhuis, Hudsonville, Mich., White Leghorn 

5 S. C. Price, Hazelton, Pa., White Leghorn 

5 C. A. Hettama, Midland Park, N. J., White Leghorn 

5 C. A. Hettama, Midland Park, N. J., White Leghorn 

5 C. H. Dear, Mayfield, Kansas, Buff Leghorn 

5 A. Ter Haar, Hudsonville, Mich, White Leghorn 

5 Grand View Farm, Zeeland, Mich., White Leghorn 

5 E. T. Fox, Watseka, 111., White Leghorn , 

5 Davidson W. L. Farm, West Alexander, Pa., White Leghorn 

5 Geo. Ghostley, Anoka, Minn., White Leghorn , , 

Jan. — Band No. 257 Davidson W. L. Farm, W. Alexander, P., W. Leg. 

Five Highest Pens in American and English Classes. 

1 Mrs. F. M. Robinson, Metamora, 111., Rhode Island Reds 

2 J. W. Wellman, Quincy, 111., Rhode Island Reds 

2 C. P. Scott, Peoria, 111., Rhode Island Reds 

2 A. B. Blevins, Kincaid, 111., Black Minorcas 

3 W. J. Jones, Bader, 111., Buff Orpingtons 

4 Kent Poultry Farm, Cazenovia, N. Y., Barred Rocks 

4 Fernside Farm, Foxboro, Mass, Rhode Island Reds 

5 Matthew Lepper, Quincy, 111., Barred Rocks 

Five Highest Individuals in American and English Classes. 

1 Fernside Farm, Foxboro, Mass., Rhode Island Red 

2 Mrs. F. M. Robinson, Metamora, 111., Rhode Island Red 

3 Fernside Farm, Foxboro, Mass., Rhode Island Red 

3 Hoppe Poultry Farm, Cullom, 111., Barred Rock 

3 O. P. Scott, Peoria, 111., Rhode Island Red 

4 John Rogers, Peoria, 111., Rhode Island Red 

4 H. E. Stockhausen, Peoria, 111., Rhode Island Red 

4 C. D. Knott, Worcester, Mass., Rhode Island Red 

4 W. J. Jones, Bader, 111., Buff Orpington _ 

4 J. W. Wellman, Quincy, 111., Rhode Island Red 

5 H. E. Stockhausen, Peoria, 111., Rhode Island Red 

5 W. J. Jones, Bader, 111., Buff Orpington 

5 Mrs. F. M. Robinson, Metamora, 111., Rhode Island Red 

5 Mrs. F. M. Robinson, Metamora, 111., Rhode Island Red 

5 Kent Poultry Farm, Cazenovia, N. Y., Barred Rock 

5 Matthew Lepper, Quincy, 111., Barred Rock 

5 Matthew Lepper, Quincy, 111., Barred Rock 

5 P. W. Ballard, Galesburg, 111., White Rock 

5 Wm. E. Bean, Anoka, Minn., White Wyandotte 

5 Nichols & Smith, Havana, 111., Rhode Island Red 

5 F. W. Boulware. Hatton, Mo., Barred Rock . 



The total number of eggs laid in 
Quincy during the month of Febru- 
ary was 7,095 and in January 6,371 
showing an increase of 72 4 eggs in 
2 8 days or 4 8 eggs a day, the aver- 
age productin of the contest being 
4 5 per cent, 9 per cent over the 
month of January. The total num- 
ber of eggs laid in Murphysboro dur- 
ing the month of February was 4,411 
an increase of 1,707 over January, 
making the average production 4 5 
per cent, 20 per cent higher than 
that of January. 

Our contests are being run on the 
same scale and the birds in each con- 
test given the same care and feed. 
They are being fed prepared stand- 
ard scratch feed and mash, varied 
with various green foods. The lights 
are turned on in the morning at five 
and off at seven. The average 
amount of mash consumed by each 
individual runs about 2.5 lbs. of 
scratch feed and 3.2 lbs. of mash. 
The birds are kept busy in a deep 
litter of straw to furnish them plenty 
of exercise and each one is carefully 
trapnested. Silver cups are sent 
each month to the prize winner in 
each class at each contest. 

Look over your breeding stock 
this time of the year. Lack of egg 
laying ability, a disqualification or 
other fault overlooked may fix it- 



93 
93 
92 

26 
25 
24 
23 
23 
23 
23 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
23 

95 
84 
84 
84 
81 
77 
77 
75 

26 
24 
23 
23 
23 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 

self so firmly in your flock that it 
will take years to overcome bad ef- 
fects of same. Hatch now for ma- 
tured pullets for the egg laying con- 
test, which will start November 1st, 
1922. 

You should have all your pens se- 
lected and mated by this time, and 
beginning to hatch at least a few 
early chicks. More depends upon se- 
lection and breeding than any other 
one thing. When you go into your 
yard and select your matings, you 
should not be afraid to eliminate 
disqualifications and serious defects. 
Follow the standard as closely as 
possible. You should also give at 
least equal consideration to the gen- 
eral health, vigor and egg laying 
qualities of your bird. In selection 
for egg production, you will not go 
far wrong if you haven't trap nest 
records to depend upon, to follow the 
chart and directions for culling, as 
printed in Bulletin No. 301, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture of Illinois. Be- 
fore your breeding yards are com- 
pleted take one more look and be 
satisfied that your selections for 
breeders are the very best you have. 
Keep the pullets which matured 
quickly and started laying first. Keep 
the late moulters and the birds with 
rather large, plump combs and watt- 
( Concluded on Page 13) 



SURE QUICK 
DEATH FOR 
RATS AND MICE 

Remarkable Triple Strength 
Virus Kills Every One 
Not A Poison 



MARVELOUS FRENCH DISCOVERY 



Rats are your enemies. They destroy your 
buildings eat your grain, kill your poultry, 
start fires and spread disease In every com- 
munity. You need no longer suffer these 
losses — You can now in a week's time easily 
kill every rat, mouse or gopher with Rat 
Virus, the great French discovery. Our triple 
strength virus is the most powerful concen- 
trated deadly virus known, the only sure, safe 
rodent destroyer. 

Triple Strength Virus is absolutely safe to 
use anywhere — positively not a poison. No 
danger to chickens, horses, cattle, hogs or 
dogs. Harmless to children or grown persons. 
Affects only rodents. 




Triple Strength Virus Is prepared in a scien- 
tific laboratory and contains only Virus germs 
deadly to rodents. The bottle and corks are 
sterilized and sealed air tight, so that all other 
germs are excluded. This Is why Triple Strength 
Virus is so deadly. It is tested on rats, mice 
and gophers before shipment — It cannot fail. 

Rats Die Outside 

Triple Strength Eat Virus Is easy to use. 
Simple directions show how. A single rat eat- 
ing the virus gets sick with a contagious 
plague disease that affects and kills all rats 
and mice in the immediate vicinity. Rats flee 
because they become infected ■with a plague 
that affects the heart, blood vessels, and lungs, 
destroying the blood corpuscles and causing 
suffocation. The rats rush outside where they 
get fresh air and water. When the diseased 
rats get outside, they never get back for the 
disease is then so far gone it kills them. No 
odor, no dead rats to handle, no live rats to kill. 

Special Introductory Offer 

We want to prove to you our claim that 
Triple Strength Rat Virus is the most potent, 
most powerful — yet non-poisonous and abso- 
lutely safe — rat virus on the market. It is a 
TRIPLE STRENGTH Virus. Contains more 
living rat virus gierms than any other rat killer 
made and will go one-third to one-half farther. 
To introduce tliis powerful Triple Strength 
Rat Virus, we will make every reader of this 
paper — for short time only — a special offer of 
a regular $2.50 bottle for only $1.00 postpaid. 
This $2.50 bottle Triple Strength Rat Virus 
Is enough to clear a big poultry house, barn or 
yard of rats and mice. 

Money Back Guarantee 

Your money back if it fails. Take no chances 
this year with traps or rat poisons. Only 
Triple Strength Rat Virus will positively kill 
rats, mice and gophers and be absolutely safe 
and sure. Give It according to directions — if 
after 30 days' trial you find any rats or mice — 
we will refund your money without question. 
Send $1 bill today sure. 

If not convenient to send $1 today — Just send 
your name and address, a postal will do — pay 
postman $1 and a few cents postage on arrival 
for regular $2.50 bottle. Remember it costs 
you nothing if it does not do all we claim. 

Agents Wanted in every community. 
GOLD SEAL LABORATORIES 
3842 W. Lake, Dept 325, Chicago, IU. 



Page Number 10 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Incubator and Brooder Inventions of the H. M. Sheer Co. 



Sol-Hot Colony Brooders. 

The Sol-Hot Coiony Brooder is a 
Canopy Brooder heated with the new- 
Super Sol-Hot Heater. With this it 
is claimed that to raise young chicks 
one does not have to worry over the 
heater going out at night or whether 
it is adjusted right so it won't smoke. 
The same steady heat can always be 
depended on. It is absolutely auto- 
matic. There are no valves or oil 
adjustments to make, no wicks to 
trim, no fumes, no smoke. If the 
supply tank has plenty of oil you 
can leave the rest to the Sol-Hot 
Heater, for it maintains an even heat 
under changing weather conditions. 
The canopy is made of heavy gal- 
vanized rust-proof material, which is 
very durable and should last indefi- 
nitely. It rests on a strong base sup- 
ported like a heating stove on four 
legs. This canopy is easily moved, 
when one wants to light the burner, 
by a metal handle that folds down 
onto canopy. 

A metal screen prevents the chicks 
from scratching litter into the burner 
to start a fire and also prevents the 
chicks from getting too near the 
flame. This screen, made of heavy 
metal, extends from floor to top of 
canopy. Just below the burner is a 
heavy galvanized pan which is partly 
filled with sand. This should be satu- 
rated with water occasionally to give 
off sufficient moisture to keep the 
heat from being too dry for the 
chicks. These canopies come in 
three sizes, varying from 32 to 52 
inches in diameter. These are shipped 
in strong wooden crates to insure 
from dents and jams. This knock- 
down feature is covered by Sheer pa- 
tents. It takes only a few minutes 
to put together the canopy, and the 
crate is convenient again at the end 
of the season for storing the canopy. 
The "Baby" Brooder. 
The Sol-Hot Brooder is designed 
for small lots of chicks. The canopy 
is 32 inches wide, of one piece, and 
the oil reservoir is smaller than in 

the larger brooders. Both heater and 
canopy are shipped in one package. 
Giant Sol-Hot Heaters. 
These are especially designed for 
use in coal burning brooder stoves 




SHEER 



and are made on the principle of the 
regulator heaters, only much larger. 
They do away with the ashes, gasses, 
and other cares of coal heaters. They 
fit into the base of coal burning 
stoves. The only care necessary is 
to replenish the oil supply as needed. 

Gas Valve for Cutting Gas Incubator 
and Brooder Cost. 
The Acme Automatic Gas Valve is 
a Sheer invention that greatly re- 
duces the cost of gas when used for 
incubators and brooders. An adjust- 
ing screw may be set to either burn 
full flame or reduce the flame to a 
minimum. The size of the flame may 
be automatically controlled by con- 
necting up with the regulator which 
raises or lowers the level of the gas 
valve. The valve is furnished com- 
plete, including burner, tip, chimney 
flange, wall bracket and hose coup- 
ling, ready to be connected with gas 
service. 

Acme Wafer Thermostats. 

The action of expansion and con- 
traction of the thermostate with heat 
or cold is the motive power that oper- 
ates the incubator regulator, thereby 
controlling the heat in the incubator 




or brooder. A patented valve is the 
keynote to the efficiency of the Acme 
Wafer Thermostats making them un- 
iformity accurate and sensitive. 

These thermostats are made single, 
compound and tandem double com- 
pound. Mr. Sheer designed the tan- 
dem double compound to supply 
greater power and more positive ac- 
tion than given by the less sensitive 
devices. This improved device is 
now used by many of the manufac- 
turers of high grade colony brooder 
stoves. This tandem thermostate may 
be instantly attached to any style of 
regulator now using a wafer ther- 
mostat. All necessary attachments 
are furnished if name of incubator 
is given when ordering. 

Acme Automatic Regulators. 

Acme Regulators are made by the 
Sheer Company in three styles. 
Style E enters side of incubator, 
leaving top free of all obstructions. 
Style D is located on top of incubator 
and its action is transmitted to damp- 
er lever by a direct upward thrust or 
push. Style C is also located on top, 
but action is transmitted to the lever 
by a downward pull. 

Miulti-Dek-Sectional Incubators. 

The Sheer Multi-Dek Sectional 
Baby Mammoth incubator is built in 
units of 250-egg capacity each. One 
can start his plant with one section 
and add as many more as are needed 
wnen desired. One heater will op- 
erate a single 250-egg section or six 
sections of 1500-egg capacity. One 
may build up a tier of 3 or 4 sec- 
tions, one on top of the other, and 
then add another tier of 4 more as 
required. Additional sections may 
be added while lower sections are in 
operation. A valve operated by the 
Acme regulator controls the heated 
air to each section. Thus overheat- 
ing in any section is impossible. Each 
section is operated independently of 
every other section. 

The Multi-Dek is heated with the 
Sol-Hot heater, which is automatic 
and requires no attention or adjust- 
ment. The heat radiators are of the 
tubular type. All joints are double 
seamed and soldered. No fumes or 
gases can find their way into the egg 
chamber. 




THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 11 




W 



LR2 



An Excellent Paper 

I am getting POULTRY KEEPER and think 
it an excellent paper for anybody interested 
in poultry raising. Please answer the follow- 
ing questions in your next issue. 

1. Do you think it necessary to clean out 
your chickens with Epsom salts every month? 

2. What chick feed do you recommend to 
start baby clucks? 

E. A. A., Pennsylvania. 
Thank you for your kind words. 
We will try to keep your good will by 
making POULTRY KEEPER as in- 
teresting and instructive as possible. 

1. As a general rule we do not 
believe in doping the fowls. Once 
in awhile it does seem necessary to 
give the birds a dose of Epsom salts 
but as a general rule we would not 
do it. Feed a more laxative diet and 
depend on the food given to keep the 
bowels in good order. Green food 
and charcoal will go a long way 
towards keeping the fowls in good 
shape. 

2. We could hardly recommend 
any particular brand of feed through 
this Department. Almost any of the 
veil known brands are satisfactory. 



Feeding Problems 

1. I have 130 pullets, one-third White Wy- 
andottes and two- third White Leghorns and I 
teed wheat in the morning, sprouted oats at 
noon and scratch feed at night. Can you tell 
ine how much feed to give each meal? 

2. I am getting four and one-half dozen 
eggs per day and wonder if that is a fair 
average? 

3. Do you know any way I could improve the 
egg yield? 

P. J. D., Maryland. 

1. A general rule a handful of 
grain is given each fowl at a feed- 
ing. As for green food it is a good 
rule to give them what they will 
clean up within a few minutes, ex- 
cept such food as beets which they 
will pick at for some time. You will 
find that the Wyandottes will de- 
mand more food than the Leghorns 
and that is one reason that I do not 
believe in keeping them together. 

2. You are not getting a big egg 
yield. We usually figure that a flock 
should produce at least fifty per cent 
and that would be 65 eggs per day 




F. Raymond Benson 
for your bunch of birds. 

3. It looks as if you were mak- 
ing a mistake in not feeding a mash. 
We keep a dry mash before the fowls 
at all times and it is a sure egg pro- 
ducer if the mash is a good one. The 
more meat scraps or dried milk 
which the mash contains, the more 




Our big Free Flower 
Circular tells you 
howbeglnncrs make 
S100 to S500, spare 
timein onesummer 
raisins flowers on a 
very small patch of 
ground, back-yard. 
Learn this easy and 
delightful business. 



FOR BIG PROFIT: 



Send your name and get Big 
Flower Circular Free by return 
mail. American Hortlcnltnre Co. 
k Department r>5 Des Moines, Iowa 



eggs you will get. But the mash 
should not contain more than 2 5 per 
cent of meat scraps. Usually about 
fifteen per cent is better. 

(Continued on page 14) 




Order Direct From This Ad 

THINK OF it I 
130Egg Incu- $1425 f 

bator for only tO 
160 Egg Size SICZS 

for only . . IV 
250 Egg Size $4425 

for only . . CC 
Freight prepaid east of 
Rockies. If you want In' 
cubator and Brooder tO' 
crether you can have 130 Eeg 
Incubator and 130 Chick 



Both 

Machines n 

Freight Paid Tor Only 





17, 




Freight Paid 



Send for our Free Catalog and we 
will send you a sample of the 
material used in Wisconsin In- 
I cubators and Brooders. Then 
1 you will know which machines 
f are built best, which will last 
I longest and which will give 
you the most value for your 
moneys 



MONEY 
BACK 
IF NOT 
SATISFIED 



f 80 Egg Incubator & 18 0 Chick Brooder on tf22 1 

tf you prefer a larger machine, our 180 Egg size ^^i5=^ ~~^y-^-^;^ ' lli y' l ^t r ^- , \ I 

at onlv $22.00 or our 250 Egg shown here at ^^C--- , •r^.'^'V'V' S J**r V, //' mJSS 



If you prefer a larger machine, our 180 Egg size 
at only $22.00 or our 250 Egg shown here at 
only $30.00, with brooders, are real bargains. 

Freight paid east of Rockies! 
Wisconsins have hot water heat, double 
walls, air space between, double glass doors, 
copper tanks and boilers, self regulating. 
Made of CaliforniaRedwood. Incubators fin- 
ished in natural colors— not painted to cover 
up cheap, shoddy material. Three sizes, 
shipped complete with thermometers, egg 
tester, lamp, etc., set up all ready to use. If 
not satisfactory after 30 days trial, send them 
back and get your money. Order direct 
from this ad, or write for free 1922 Catalog. 





WISCONSIN Siring COLONY BROODERS 1 

Automatic control— can't go out— can't overflow— no 
wicks to carbon — burns steady blue flame — no valves 
•et— the best colony brooder on the market. 

'2 130 Egg Incubator with Colony Brooder $22.25 1 
"•»i8o •« " « " 27.75 
250 ' " " 34.25 1 



WISCONSIN INCUBATOR COMPANY. Box 34 j RACINE, WIS. 



Lady Di 



Can Supply Eggs and Chicks 

PROMPTLY 
for APRIL and MAY Delivery 




LADY PURITAS 



Safe Arrival 
and 100 per 
cent Fertility 
Guaranteed 



PURITAS 




Every Chick 
Guaranteed to 
reach you alive 
and lively 



8 TO 12 WEEKS OLD PUL- 
LETS AND COCKERELS 
AFTER MAY 1st. 



SPRINGS 



S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS 

Trapnested for Over Ten Years Without Missing Cne Day. Every Nest on Our Farm is a Trapnesl 
THAT'S HOW WE PRODUCED THE WORLD'S GREATEST LAYERS 



COME SEE OUR LEGHORNS 

YOU WILL WANT SOME 




SUCCESS DEPENDS ON YOUR START 

11 you can't come to see our wonderful laying Leghorns you should send for 
our big free, instructive catalog and read what our customers say about them. Catalog gives prices and tells all about them, with many photo- 
graphs. April and May are the two best month for Leghorn Chicks. Will be glad to supply vou with Chicks and Eggs. Have Leghorns you can 
be proud of. 



| Formerly 

Puntas Springs Poultry Farm — Box Pill — -Avon Lake, Ohio — S. J. Schenk, Owner and Mgr. I berea, 



5T 
O. 



Page Number 12 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Mankato incubators 



^1 



THE OLD RELIABLE HATCHER 

with a record. Made by experts 
of 28 years' experience building 
and operating incubators and 
raising poultry. Wonderful special features, makes 
the Mankato the leader of all incubators. 1 1 
batches the highest per cent of strong chicks in 
any climate, wimer or summer. Sold at lowest 
price under strong binding guarantee. It is the 
one high class hatcher that is made right and sold 
risht. Don't experiment, get the dependable 
quality Mankato that has stood the test of time. 

NO BETTER INCUBATOR MADE 

Wellmade of best material in natural red wood finish, 
three thicknesses of walls, heavy pure copper hot 
waler tank and boiler, perfect automatic regulator, 
correct ventilation, safety lamp, large oil tank — 
one filling to hatch, high nursery, tested thermo- 
meter, etc. Heavy, well insulated wall construc- 
tion and special double heating system Insures 
uniform temperature and highest percent hatches 




Largest 
factory ., 

in tho 13 AH set up ready for i 
15 *£ £3 Tl > e m ° at durable, s .... 
North- 3 p] e , surl ,, safe, hand- 
WCSt. some. Also coal and oil 

Brooder stoves and 
Brooders for Outdoor and Indoor Use. 
Big new annual book and catalog free. 

Mankato Incubator Co. 

Box 735 Mankato, Minn. 



Shipped 
Freight 
Prepaid. 
Quick 

Delivery from fac- 
tory at factory 
prices. Write to- 
day for free book. 



Spraying Guide 

PPPP Every poultryman needs 
r IXLiL an Auto -Spray for disin- 
fecting incubators, brooders, colony 
and laying houses, also for spraying 
garden crops and fruit »3j 
trees. Our Spraying Guide « 
describes over 40 Auto-Spray J~f 
outfits, including hand, knap- 
sack, wheelbarrow and trac- 
tion styles. Over 750,009 
satisfied users. 
Write today asking for 
Guide and Spray Cal< 
endar prepared by 
Cornell Specialists. 

E. C. Brown Co. 
895 Maple St. 
Rochester, 
New York. 




CARE OF YOUNG CHICKS 

W. H. Underwood 

Before a chick passes the danger 
line at 4 weeks of age its life may 
be divided into three periods, each 
requiring a different treatment. 

The first period is a continuation 
of the incubation lasting 24 to 3 6 
hours. The second period is the stu- 
pid period or when the chick cannot 
select the proper food. This is be- 
fore the natural instincts are devel- 
oped. The third is from the devel- 
opment of the instincts until it has 
crossed the danger line at 4 weeks 
of age. 

During the first period the chick 
requires almost as high a tempera- 
ture as when the eggs are hatching. 
This is when the yolk is being as- 
similated and the chick spends most 
of the time in sleeping and resting. 
The chicks should be left in the in- 
cubator until 24 to 3 6 hours old to 
harden off. This is the age that 
ends the first period. At this age 
the chicks may be fed for the first 
time. 

The first feed we supply consists 
of dry bread crumbs sufficiently 
moistened with milk to be crumbly, 
care being taken to prevent the food 
from being sloppy. Over the moist- 
ened bread crumbs a little chick grit 
is sprinkled. This feed is given the 
first day; then we gradually intro- 
duce cracked grain consisting of 
equal parts of wheat, corn, and oat- 
meal. We keep clean fresh water 
and sweet whole milk before them 
all the time from the first feed. The 
milk pushes the weaker ones ahead 
that, hardly know enough to eat and 
in this way some that would other- 
wise die are saved. We use about a 




QUALITY BABY CHICKS 

20,000 BREEDERS, bred exclusively for high egg 
production, and standard qualities. Every fowl selected 
by the Hogan Test. Our Leghorns, Rocks, Reds, 
Orpington, Wyandottes, and Anconas bred to capacity 
of 200 egg hens. 

LARGE PRODUCTION enables us to sell quality 
chicks at price of common hatchery product. 

INCUBATOR CAPACITY 10,000 eggs each day, 
all eggs used are from these flocks. 

Our 32-page illustrated catalogue is free, and gives 
valuable information on care of chicks and poultry. 

Hatching eggs in season at very reasonable prices. 
Chicks shipped by parcel post prepaid, live arrival 
guaranteed. 

MISSOURI POULTRY FARMS, 

Columbia, Mo. 



p^y^mY Fr0IB Gre ?' layers, FuJi-blooded stock 

CHIX 



1 y 2 MILLION Chicks for 1922 

Postage PAID and 

95% Live Arrival Guaranteed 

Bofry Mon $| E Feed 

\&LjsMM/ With Each 0rder 

A hatch every week all year. DO IT WITH OUR CHICKS if you want to 
make QUICK money, 40 breeds chicks, 4 breeds ducklings. Select and Ex- 
hibition grades. Catalogue free, stamps appreciated. 
NABOB HATCHERIES, Dept. 16, Gambier. Ohio 





* One ol the Largest 
^S^'U} V and Best Equipped 
Hatcheries Sn the 
WORLD. 
Over 50,000 Cbix Weekly. 
Postpaid to your door, and 
guaranteed 95% alive delivery. 
Customers report hens as laying 280 
eggs a year from our stock. 

Get our famous blood lines of 
Leghorns, Anconas, Rocks. Reds, 
Orpingtons, Wyandottes* 
MInorcas. 

Get our low prices first, before ordering. 
We save you money. 
Large instructive catalog free. 

FARR0W-BIRSB CO.. PEORIA. ILL 





Poultry Leg Bands 

Colored Leader Adjustable, fit 

anything from bantam to goose, 
numbered consecutively, Red, Blue, 
Green, Yellow, Pink. 
100, $1.50; 50, $1.00; 25,60c. 

Heavy Aluminum, numbered 
consecutively, large raised figures, 
millions have been sold, adj us table 
for any size bird, will stay on. 
100, 60c; 50. 35c; 25, 20c. 
Celluloid Spiral, 10 colors, 
Red, Green, Garnet, Black, 
White, Pink, Yellow, Purple, 
Light Blue and Dark Blue. 

25 60 100 250 500 
No. 1 Brahmas Giants etc.. .$.45 $.75 $1.20 $2.75 J5.00 

No. 2 Rocks Reds etc .40 .60 1-00 2.25 4.00 

No. 3 Leghorns, Anconas, etc.. .35 .50 .90 2-00 3-50 
Prices are postpaid. State color and dreed. 

Eureka Supply House Box K, Mount Morns, Hi. 

tablespoonful of grit sprinkled over 
the food for each 50 chicks. 

We have often heard the expres- 
sion "Feed all that they will eat up 
clean." This is a mistake for young 
chicks will eat far more than what is 
good for them. We have several dif- 
ferent methods of feeding and all 
give fairly satisfactory results but 
young chicks should not be allowed 
to overeat. 

Any person who has watehed 
young chicks eat has noticed them 
peck at everything that attracts their 
attention and quite often this hap- 
pens to be their own droppings. 
These dropping will cause illness 
if the chick manages to swallow it. 
To avoid any danger we like to feed 
the chicks on old newspapers spread 
over the floor. After the chicks have 
finished eating the papers are burned 
and the chicks are put back in the 
brooder to await the next feed two 
hours later. 

We have found it advisable to 
keep the chicks in their brooders the 
first few days except at feeding time. 
If they receive a chill diarrhoea is 
certain to follow with dangerous re- 
sults. As I said before during this 
second period the chicks' natural in- 
stincts are not fully developed and on 
this account they will fill up on any- 
thing digestible or indigestible. Dur- 
ing this period sand or other hard 
substances should not be where the 
chicks can peck at it at will. In our 
early experience in rearing chicks we 
had many die from being literally 
stuffed on sand. After the first week 
there will be none of this trouble. 

If milk cannot be supplied, beef 
scraps should be fed each day; ten 
per cent of meat scraps to 90 per 
cent of other food. Green food is 
necessary. We feed sprouted oats 
the chicks being very fond of them. 
The third period comes in about the 
seventh or tenth day or when the 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 13 



chick has developed its natural in- 
stinct and becomes selective of its 
own feed. From this time on we 
keep hoppers of grit , fine oyster 
shell, charcoal, beef scraps, and bran 
as well as a mixture of other grains 
before them all the time if they can 
run outside. If they are confined in- 
side we scatter the grain in litter to 
compel the chicks to exercise. An 
occasional feed of green cut bone is 
beneficial. At six weeks of age the 
cracked grains may be discontinued 
and whole grains fed. 



HERE ARE RATIONS FOR FEED- 
ING BABY CHICKS 



D. C. Kennard, poultryman at the 
Ohio Experiment Station, has found 
the following rations to be effective 
in growing chicks and also to prevent 
loss from feeding troubles. 

For the first six weeks the chicks 
receive a ration composed of ground 
corn, five, bran or middlings, four, 
and meatscraps or tankage, one, parts 
by weight. 

The scratch grain consists of equal 
parts by weight of fine cracked corn, 
cracked wheat, pinhead oats. In ad- 
dition all the skimmilk or butter- 
milk the chicks will drink is provid- 
ed. No water is given. 

All the green feed the chicks will 
eat is provided after the first week. 
Grit and oyster shells are also kept 
in hoppers. 

The scratch grain is fed five times 
daily and the dry mash kept before 
the chicks in open feeders. 

After the sixth week the scratch 
grain consists of three parts cracked 
corn, one part whole wheat by 
weight and is fed twice daily. 

The mash is then made up of 
ground corn, four, bran or middlings, 
four, meatscraps or tankage, two 
parts by weight. 

All the green feed the chicks will 
eat should be provided, but if skim- 
milk is not available, or involves too 
much expense, it may be replaced by 
addition of meatscraps or tankage. 



Left-over pieces of bread may be 
stored in a crock in the warming 
oven of the kitchen range and used 
for puddings and stuffings, or ground 
for escalloped dishes. 



DUCKS AND GEESE 



This book gives reliable Information and ad- 
vise on breeding dneks and geese for market, 
for breeders and for exhibition. It is full of 
practical reliable information. With this book 
anyone can be successful, almost regardless of 
location. Many well-known authorities have con- 
tributed special articles. 

Well illustrated, 104 pages, 9 by 12 inches. 
Price 75c, postpaid. Address Poultry Keeper, 
Quincy, Illinois. 



!!!■**' FENCE " : 
¥ 3*rices Slashed 



Here is the greatest money saving sale' 
you ever heard of. Prices cut to the bone on Fences, 
Gates, Steel Pouts, Roofing and Paint. 

GET BROWN'S FACTORY PRICES 

Don't spend a cpnt until you j?et my prices. 
You'll he surprised when you compare with 
others. Remember I pay freight and sell only 
direct from my factories to you. 

CDCC 96-PAGE BOOK 
rifEX OF BIG BARGAINS 

The greatest bargain book ever printed. 
Every page is like rinding money. Buy now 
ng this sate. Prices dropped to the bottom, 
a postal and mail NOW. jj m Brown. Pres. 

Brown Fence & Wire Co., Oept. 574 Cleveland, Ohio 





Keep Down the 
Louse Pest 

IT means better fowls, more eggs, better 
growth in chicks Chicks are com ing along 
now. Don't let them be pestered to death. 
Sprinkle Dr. Hess Instant Louse Killer in 
the feathers, in the nests, on roosts, about 
pens, coops and yards. Be sure to keep it 
in the dust bath all the year 'round. That 
means louse prevention. When setting the 
hen sprinkle it in the bottom of the nest 
before adding the litter and the eggs. Then 
your brood will come off free from lice. 

An excellent bug killer to use on cucum- 
ber, squash, and melon vines, slugs oa 
roses, etc. Guaranteed. 

t lb. 25c 2% lbs. 50c 

Except in the far West and Canada 

DR. HESS & CLARK Ashland, Ohio 




sites 

DR. HESS INSTANT 
LOUSE KILLER 



PRICES 'WAY DOWN 

We have knocked the bottom out of the 
High Cost of Fence Building. You 
can save from 25 to 40 per cent on our 
High Quality— Low Priced rust resist- 
ing fences. Here's a man that 

SAVED 38 PER CENT 

Mr. R. A. Dillard, Milton, Okla., writes: 
"I found all the Fence as good or better 
than I expected. A rare bargain. I saved 
916.65 on my $75.00 order." 

Why not put this big saving in your own 
pocket through our 

Direct From Factory to Farm 

plan of selling? Kitselmans' low prices and Long- 
Lasting Fences have reduced fence building costs 
for more than a half-million farmers. 

WE PAY THE FREIGHT 

save you money on every rod and sell you a better fence. 
Write us today for Free Catalog and money-saving prices 
on Farm, Poultry and Lawn Fence, Gates and Barb Wire. 

KITSELMAN BROTHERS, Dept. 229 MUNCIE, IND. 



ILLINOIS EGG LAYING CONTEST 

(Continued from Page 9) 



les. Hens with pale vents, pale 
beaks and pale legs have been good 
layers. The skin of the best layers 
should be rather loose and flabby 
on the abdomen between the vent 
and breast bone. The pelvic bones 
must be thin, straight, flexible and 
wide apart. Keep the hustlers and 
heavy eaters that go to bed late and 
with full crops. Market the hens 
which have a heavy, fat, thick ab- 
domen which hangs down below the 
point of the breast bone, and those 
which have been slow to feather or 
seem to lack vitality. The bird that 
meets the requirements of a profit- 
able one should have a broad back, 
long body, be stoutly built and in 
good flesh. 



At Wire Mill Prices! 

, ' Before you choose any fence, get my 
™ Free Book showing 164 styles and sizes. 

Special 15-Day Sale ^ n >jt°» 

^ big sale Satisfaction Guaranteed or money back 
h- "Mpmeit from Factory Warehouse near you Write 

OTTAWA MFG. CO. 
FSRflS£>K>.. 607 A Union Ave. 

; !tr Ottawa, 
Write "»% :-trr--:i;-.- Kas. 



SUPERIOR LEG BANDS 




Aluminum 


Spiral - 


Sure 


Clinch 


Celluloid 


12 - 


S .15 


12 - $ .15 


25 - 


.25 


25 - .30 


50 - 


.35 


50 - .50 


100 - 


.65 


100 - .95 


250 - 


1.50 


250 - 2.00 


500 - 


2.50 


500 - 3.25 



Also, colored number bands. Baby 
chick bauds. State breed and sex. Postpaid. Cat. free. 
AURORA BAND C0.79USalle St., AURORA, ILL 



Page Number 14 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



^ Diarrhea 



Success in raising the chicks you hatch 
depends most largely on feed and care 
in the first 10 days. 

F.P.G. Chick Manna 

For Chicks, Turkeys, Pheasants 

proved its wonderful merit in 1884. Since 
then we have watched quality. Quality, 
QUALITY, — regardless of cost. Only best 
cereals, animal food, etc. : no seconds. 
Wholesome as your own food. 

F. P. C. Chick Manna is not the cheap- 
est feed; it can't be. But it will save 
the chicks. At dealers or write us. Satis- 
faction or money back. 

F. P. CASSEL'S SON 



Box 30 



Lansdale, Pa. 





Mil, ITER'S 

THE OLD RELIABLE ILLINOIS HATCHERY, 

Select Chicks from Heavy Laying Hens. 

"White and Brown Leg- 
horns, 50-$7, 100-$13, 
500-$62.50. Barred Rocks 
and S. C. Reds, 50-$8, 
100-$15, 500472.50. W. 
Wyandottes, W. Rocks, 
R. C. Reds, 50-$8.50, 
100 -$16., 500-577.50. 
Black Langshan, Buff 
Orpington, Parks Barred 
Rocks, 50-?9, 100-$17, 
500-$82.50. S. C. An- 
conas, 331 Egg Strain, 
50-$9.50, 100-$18, 500-$87.50. Buff Rocks, 50- 
$9.50, 100-$1S.00, 500-$87.50. "White Orpingtons, 
50-$10.50, 100-$20.00. 100 per cent Live Delivery 
Guaranteed. Prepaid Parcel Post. Order Now 
Prom This Ad and Save Time. Reference, 
State Bank. Catalogue Free. 
MILLER HATCHERY, Box K, Heyworth, 111, 



BABY CHICKS 

Bred Right. Hatched 
Right, from Free Range 
Stock of select quality. 
97% Live Delivery Guar- 
anteed by parcel post di- 
rect from hatchery. We 
hatch Barred, White 
Rocks Reds, White, Gold- 
en Wyandottes, White, 
Brown Leghorns, Anconas, 
Broiler Chicks. Write for 
our Free ii.uoixated Catalog. NEW WASHING- 
TON HATCHERY, Dept. K, New Washington, 0. 



Saves Food! 

Catch Tray A, collects 
waste and returns it 
when inverted to close 
hopper against rats and 
mice at night. (See dot- 
ted lines). If your deal- 
er can not supply you 
send for circular and or- 
der direct. 

M. R. JACOBUS 
Bx 5-K Ridgefield, N.J. 



WHITE WYANDOTTE EGGS $3 SETTING, 

Hundred $10, prepaid. Fine stock, prepaid. Crom 
Chemical Co., Poultry Dept., Anderson, Ind. 





QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

(Continued from page 11) 

Hatching Egg Problems 

1. Do you think that eggs hatch better by 
not testing them out? It would reduce hand- 
ling them. 

2. Do you think it best to air the eggs or 
turn them and put right back into the machine? 

3. Do you believe in feeding little chicks 
hard boiled eggs? A neighbor told me it was 
cruel to do so. 

4. Can you tell the sex of Barred Rock or 
Rhode Island Red day old chicks? 

5. Send me your ideas on feeding day old 
chicks. 

J. E. ., Tennessee. 
A stamped envelope was not en- 
closed so you will receive the answer 
in this Department. We cannot ans- 
swer unless a stamp is sent. 

1. By alls means test out the in- 
fertile eggs. Also test out the eggs 
where the germs were weak and they 
have died. This gives the other egg's 
more room, prevents impure air in 
the machine and reduces the amount 
of labor. 

2. Eggs must be aired unless you 
have some patent device such as some 
of the big machines have adopted. 
Follow the directions of the manu- 
facturer of your machine. 

3. We have done so for many 
years but we mixed bread crumbs 
and oat meal with the boiled eggs. 
It has always proven a good starter 
for us and we do not believe it is 
cruel. 

4. No. 

5. We cannot go into feeding 
chicks in this Department as the 
room is limited. We believe in feed- 
inch the eggs, crumbs and oat meal 
to start with and then feed grain and 
dry mash. We also use sour milk 
and we loose as few chicks as any- 
one. We can give you more complete 
directions if a stamp is sent. 



Needs the Standard 

1. Will you please tell me if a pure Buff 
Orpington should have black tail feathers? 

2. Should the ear-lobes be white or red? 

O. F., Kentucky. 

j-. Black is to be avoided as is 
white in any section. 

2. The ear-lobes should be red. 
It would be well for your to buy a 
copy of the Standard of Perfection so 
that you may know just what you 
have. You can obtain a copy from 
POULTRY KEEPER for $2.50. 



Wants Trapnest Plans 

I wish to know how to construct a trapnest 
without buying a book. 

A. H. , Tennessee. 
It would be much better if you had 
the plans for a trapnest as it is dif- 
ficult to explain it. The main idea 
is to arrange a hinged door with a 



Don't Let It Get a Start 1 

' White Diarrhea is a germ disease, 
causing irritation which brings on an . 
J inflamed condition of the intestines, result- 1 
ling in a rapid breaking: down of the tissues.^ 
FUnless soon relieved, it will kill the chick. 



(78) 

I tends to destroy the germs that cause the 
i trouble and to allay the feverish condi- 
j tion prevailing throughout the intestinal , 
1 tract. 

i Put it inthe Drinking Waler and the chickens 
1 do the rest. It is readily soluble and 
1 quickly reaches the seat of the trouble. 
1 Also use it as a preventive, 
i DONKEY'S LICE POWDER.for dusting hens, 
1 nests, growing chicks and for use j 
\ wherever body lice exist, 
i CONKEY'S LICE LIQUID will immedi- 
ately rid your fowls and house of mites. 
Insist on Conkey's. If your dealer can 
not supoly you, write us. Large Poul- j 
try Book sent for 6c in stamps. 

The G. E. Conkey Co. 

>6542Broadway, Cleveland, O. 



Kills Hatching 

Many fanciers now use Egg-O-Latum, the great 
egg preserver, on all eggs for the market. It 
not only keeps them fresh but prevents hatching, 
thus protecting against the pirates who watch 
to obtain high grade hatching stock at market- 
prices. Rub on — wipe off — does not show — Eggs 
will never hatch but keep fresh longer. 

Eefsf-O- Latum is a soft - white ' cerate 

00 wax, odorless, tasteless, 

harmless. Applied by simply coating palms of 
the hands, then rubbing on eggs; a dozen a min- 
ute. Keeps eggs fresh one year. A 50c jar 
enough for 50 dozen eggs, SI jar for 200 dozen. 
If no dealer, order by card. Postman will col- 
lect. No extra charge. Handy as 'phoning. 
Geo. H. Lee Co., Dept. P-20 Omaha, Neb. 



Get Prices on Old Trusty 
Incubators and Brooders. 

Nearly a million in use. Quick 
shipment. Low prices. Free 
catalog to any address on re- 
quest. M.M.JOHNSON CO. 
Clay Center, Nebraska 




Shipment | Freight 



BROODERS 



For $4.96, including heater, you can 
build the simplest, most efficient, 
and most satisfactory brooder ever made. 
Wind-proof; fire-proof; rat-proof; fool-proof. 
Can be built by anyone in an hour, witb saw 
and hammer. Thousands in use. Plans 10c. 

I. PUTNAM Route 424-B ELMIRA, N. Y. 



TRAP-NESTED 
S. C. W. LEGHORNS 
OUR SPECIALTY 



H ah worthy 




HOME OF HALL'S HUSKY HUSTLERS. 



100% 

LIVE ARRIVAL 
GUARANTEED 



Baby Chicks 

TEN REASONS WHY YOU NEED HALLWORTHY CHICKS 



1. OUR CHICKS GIVE DESIRED 

RESULTS. 

2. WE HELP SUPPLY THE IN- 

CREASING DEMAND FOR 
BETTER CHICKS. 

3. OUR FLOCK LAYING AVER- 

AGES ARE HIGH. 

4. OUR CHICKS ARE DIKE HEN 

HATCHED CHICKS. 



5. EVERY FLOCK IS UNDER OUR PERSONAL SUPERVISION. 

6. ALL FLOCKS AND CHICKS MUST PASS RIGID IN- 

SPECTION. 

LARGE CATALOG CONTAINING 
VALUABLE FEEDING ADVICE. 



H. 



FREE 

HALLWORTHY POULTRY FARM 

H. Hall, Prop. Box 105, ELYRIA, OHIO 



7. WE USE PURE FRESH AIR 

METHOD OF INCUBATION. 

8. OUR INCUBATORS ARE UNDER 

CONSTANT CARE OF EXPERT 
OPERATORS. 

9. YOU GET FULL VALUE FOR 

YOUR MONEY. 

10. OUR CHICKS PAY BIG DIVI- 

DENDS. Write Now. 



trigger and when the hen goes into 
the nest to lay she sets off this trig- 
ger and it shuts the door. As a rule 
the door drops down as that 
makes it more simple. You had bet- 
ter buy the book "Poultry House and 
Fixtures". You can get it from Mr. 
A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, Illinois, for 
$1.00 postpaid. You will find sev- 
eral trapnest plans in this book. 



A Round Incubator 

1. What variety of ducks do you advise 
for eggs and meat? 

2. Do you think that a round incubator 
with a lamp in the center is better than a 
square one ? 

3. To keep lice out of the nests, put a small 
onion in the nest. 

C. A., Michigan. 

1. Personally we like the Pekin 
duck the best when everything is con- 
sidered. The Rouen duck is quite pop- 
ular but the Pekin has white feathers 
and this is an item worth consider- 
ation. Some are enthusiastic about 
the Indian Runner but we believe it 
pays to raise a large duck. They 
may not lay quite as many eggs as 
the Indian Runner but as a general 
purpose duck they have stood the 
test of time. 

2. That would depend on the con- 
struction of the incubator. We have 
used one round metal incubator 
which gave good results but some 
machines are so cheaply made that 
they do not give good results. As a 
rule they are economical machines 
to run. Before we would buy any 
machine we would want to know that 
it was well constructed. 

3. We thank you for this idea of 
the onion in the nest and pass it on 
to the readers to experiment with if 
they wish. We wish all our readers 
would show the same spirit in giv- 
ing this Department help. 



American and English Leghorns 

Will you kindly explain the difference be- 
tween the English and American White Leg- 
horns? I do not understand the distinction 
and am sure that there are many others in 
the same, position. 

H. C. S., Indiana. 

The Standard of Perfection does 
not recognize the English Leghorn 
but so many have taken up the 
breeding of them for egg production 
that it seems as if we must give 
them some recognition. In a word 
they are larger, have a big comb and 
are more on the order of our White 
Minorca. The egg laying trait is bred 
into them very strongly and they do 
very well for this purpose. Not be- 
ing so trim and neat as our own 
Leghorns we doubt if they will ever 
be considered seriously in the show- 
room. 



Are They Cured. 

Last summer and fall I had roup among my 
fowls. I liave doctored them and can see no 
signs of sickness now. Do you suppose this 
fact would cause trouble among the chicks? 

Mrs. P. H., Colorado. 

In the first place I do not believe 
in breeding from fowls which have 
been very sick. Vigor is more im- 
portant than anything else. Without 
it your flock will soon go to pieces 
and anything which tends to weaken 
the vigor of your flock tears down. 
I doubt if you had roup, even if you 
think it was present. It is not easily 
cured and often breaks out time and 
again. As the matter stands I would 
keep the yards and houses well dis- 
infected. Feed a well balanced ra- 
tion with plenty of green food and 
keep the birds as near par as possi- 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



ble. Discard these birds which seem 
weak and breed from the strongest. 

The Campines. 

Will you kindly tell me how many different 
kinds of Campines there are in our Standard? 

J". 0. J., niinois. 

There are two — the silver and the 
Golden Campines. Glad to know that 
you are interested in this fowl as it 



Page Number 15 



should be more generally bred here 
in the middle west. 

Preserving Meat. 

Do you know of any practical method of pre- 
serving meat or making meat scraps? I can 
occasionally get broken down horses or animals 
from trapping and wish to make my meat 
scrap for the summer. 

R. R. IS.., South Dakota. 

(Continued on Page 18) 



\V. G. UiERADITH, Box K, Danvers, Illinois 



UPPER'S REAL WHITE ROCKS 

Have mated three fine pens for the egg trade. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Winners at Adams County Fair, Illinois State Show, and Quality Show 
Quincy. A few fine cockerels for sale. 

CHARLES LEPPER, Route 4, Quincy, Illinois 




Who Originated the First Oil 
Burning Canopy Brooder? 



(Super Sol-Hot 
Heater for Canopy 
tBrooders and 
'incubators 



. There has been some confusing statements made with re- 
gard to who originated the oil burning canopy brooder. In 

~ -~C order that the poultry raising public may know the FACTS 

* we show here the FIRST one ever made. It was made by H. M. 
Sheer years ago, and tested for several ~~ 
years before being offered to the public. 

From this first and original brooder the 
now famous Sol-Hot Brooder was per- 
fected — all of the improvements are 
covered by patents issued to H. M. Sheer. 

The Only Heater 
With Positive Oil Control, 

The Super Sol-Hot is the only heater on the market with a positive oil con- 
trol—it is accomplished with a patent thermostat and float (like on a carburetor) which 
maintains a constant oil level that insures an even burning flame all the time. Sol-Hot 
requires no regulating— it has no valves or springs to adjust — it is automatic. It is equipped 
with patent non-carbonizing Metal Vaporizer which does away with the old-fashioned 
troublesome wicks and asbestos ring vaporizers. 

Why Buy Imitations — Get the Best 

When you are in the market for an Oil Burning Canopy 
Brooder, come to the originators for it, be on the safe side 
and get the best. Send us your name and address and 
;et our free descriptive folder telling all about this 
better heater and canopy brooder. Get the facts 
and you'll never buy anything but Sol-Hot. 

H. M. SHEER COMPANY 

Dept. 28 . Quincy, Illinois (25) 






Test Your Eggs 



BEFORE 



you put them in the incubator or set them under hens. Let 
the Magic Egg Tester decide the strength of the egg to 
incubate. Test is both rapid and positive. A pair of eyes, 
no judgment, no light, no expense, and lasts a life-time. 
Advertised in Poulty Journals many years. Testimonials 
from poultry-men and chemists. $2.50 each. Insured Parcel Post sent same day order is 
received. Orders by telegraph dispatched C. O. D. Most valuable incubation methods 
with every Tester. This Tester is fully guaranteed as represented. Circular free. Read on: 

NOT IN YOUR LIFE-TIME 

will you, nor ANY ONE else, hatch ONE egg that the Magic Egg Tester rejects BEFORE 
incubation. We challenge the world to do it!! Off to the store with UNHATCHABLE 
EGGS. Buy this Tester and save eggs, time and money. One year's trial when requested 

Cost refunded after trial i f not satisfied. Most valuable bulletins. 

Magic Egg Tester Works, Dept. E Buffalo, N. Y„ also Bridgeburg, Canada. 




M EATPLUSEGGS 



That is what you get when you breed from 

Meradith Bred 

Heavy Laying Barred Rocks. 

Individuals of this strain have reached 11% 
lbs. for hens, and have record of 325 eggs in 
year. Selected eggs from heavy laying, well 
marked, large, vigorous breeders, 15-SS2.50, 
30-$4.50, 50-.f0.00, 100-S10.00. Eggs from 
specially selected pens 15-S5.00, 30-S9.0O. I 
still have a few choice cockerels for sale. 




IN ONE YEAR 



Page Number 16 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



An Interesting History of Mr. J. W. Myers, 

President, Reliable Incubator & Brooder Co. 



In January, 1876, when fif- 
teen years old Mr. J. W. Myers, 
started what was known at that 
time as the Soldiers Home Poul- 
try Yards with his older broth- 
er. This was just forty-six 
years ago last January. They 
were breeding Silver Laced Wy- 
andottes, Barred and White 
Plymouth Rocks, Light Brah- 
mas and rabbits. 

In 1879 and 1880 Mr. Myers 
had been experimenting on arti- 
ficial incubators, thinking there 
was some manner in which 
chickens could be hatched with- 
out taking up the time of his 
valuable hens, and during these 
two years their experimenting 
as to hatching chickens was a 
grand success, and in August, 1880, he applied for 
a patent and the patent was allowed on an incu- 
bator for artificial hatching on chickens. 

In 1881 Mr. Myers began advertising and manu- 
facturing for sale an incubator under the name of 
the Leader Incubator & Brooder Company, and in 
1885 they secured a patent on another incubator 
and brooder and changed their name from the 
Soldiers Home Poultry Farm to the Reliable Poul- 
try Farm and since that time to the Reliable In- 
cubator & Brooder Company. 

Mr. J. W. Myers was president and has been 
since the first of the old Soldiers Home Poultry 
Yards and has made many wonderful improve- 
ments and has gotten out patents from year to 
year, and in another place of this paper you will 
find one of the most notable Blue Flame Oil Heat- 
ed Colony Hovers, which Mr. Myers has been 
studying and figuring for several years until he 
has gotten it to perfection and offered it to the 
trade in 1917, and guarantees it positively success- 
ful in your hands or money refunded. 

Mr. Myers was not satisfied alone with the ad- 
vertising through the press of his incubators and 
brooders, but during the World's Fair at Chicago, 
he put on a most notable exhibit and took the 
highest honors, he spread out from that time on 
and during the next twelve years exhibited his in- 
cubators in Inter- 
national State 
Expositions, 
State shows, etc., 
etc., going from 
the Chicago 
World's Fair to 
the International 
Exposition at At- 
lanta, Georgia, 
Omaha, Nebras- 
ka ; St. Louis, 
Missouri; Dallas, 
Texas, Brussels, 
Belgium; Staven- 
ger, Norway ; 
C hrist church, 
New Zeal and ; 





Naples, Italy; Lima, Peru, and 
in Paris, France he built his own 
building to exhibit in. He also 
exhibited at several points in 
Canada and a great many other 
places too numerous to take up 
space. 

Mr. Myers started to manu- 
facture goods in a barn, from 
there he rented the first floor 
of an old dilapidated store room. 

From there he moved to another lo- 
cation of three stories and a base- 
ment 50x80 dimensions on each 
floor and as business grew larger he 
moved to other quarters with about 
twice the amount of space of the old 
place. One of the venerable citizens 
/ j * of- Quincy built a building for him 
, leased it to him for 12 years. Mr. 
Myers thinking this building would 
be sufficient for all his lifetime ,and 
when the ten years came around they did not have room 
enough to do business and he moved out at the edge of 
the city of Quincy, where they had plenty of'land, and 
purchased two and one-half acres and built an all stone 
factory building. After eight years in this location he 
had outgrown this plant and is now located in a two 
story building which he built himself on a five acre 
track and is one of the most notable and roomy incu- 
bator factories in the world, all made of stone, and is a 
monument for any city. They have been located in this 
new modern factory a little over four years. Their en- 
tire factory is operated by electricity. The business so 
far this year has far exceeded any previous year and is 
now taxing their large new foundry to its full extent, 
working full force, fifteen hours each day. 

They make a full line of poultry equipment from a leg 
band or poultry punch up to a 1,100 Egg Capacity In- 
cubator. They manufactured the famous Blue Flame 
Wickless Oil Heated Colony Hover since 1917; also the 
Coal Burning Colony Brooder, which burns soft coal 
equally as well as hard coal and with perfect satisfaction 
They have equipped a great number of poultry farms 
and baby chick hatcheries with their incubators, Blue 
Flame "Wickless Hovers and Coal Brooders. 

Mr. Myers was very emphatic in his. remarks that they 
would not manufacture an article that he had not tested, 
and that he was positive it would give satisfaction, and 
that quality was his motto, First, Last and Always. His 
company, the Reliable Incubator & Brooder Company, 
watches every point for the benefit of their customers 
and their interest. 

Mr. Myers is a life member of the American Poultry 
Association, and has done a great deal for the up-lifting 
of thorough-bred poultry. He is active in the interests 

of his own town, be- 
longs to nearly all 
of the mercantile 
clubs, etc., etc., and 
is working for the 
good of his custom- 
ers. If you will ex- 
amine the wonder- 
ful inventions that 
he has made and 
send for the printed 
matter, you will 
find something far 
in excess of any- 
thing that has ever 
been offered. 

A postal card ad- 
dressed to the Reli- 
able Incubator & 
Brooder Company, 
Quincy, Illinois, will 
bring their catalog. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 17 



TIMELY TOPICS 

Readers are asked to co-operate in making this Department 
interesting by sending in suitable items to, F. Raymond 
Benson, 915 Augusta Ave., Elgin, Illinois. 



A. Slogan. 
Bite off more than you can chew, 

Then chew it. 
Plan for more than you can do, 

Then do it. 
Hitch your wagon to a star, 
Keep your seat, and there you are! 
— Pittsburgh Christian Advocate. 

"We heard the other day that Hen- 
ry Ford predicted synthetic eggs. We 

wonder if they will have tin shells. 

* * * 

Arthur C. Chapin, specialist in 
poultry extension work with the 
Agriculture College, University of 
Kentucky, Lexington, has resigned 
and taken up poultry work at the 
Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, 
Cookeville, Tenn. 

* * * 

The Chinese egg question is up to 
Congress and if you don't get busy 
and tell your Congressman and Sen- 
ator what you think about it — well 
don't kick if you don't get what you 
want. Action is needed at once. 

* * * 

T. J. Enslin, secretary of the Co- 
lumbian Plymouth Rock Club, Hack- 
ettstown, N. J., has severed his busi- 
ness connection and is going to de- 
vote his time to poultry and the Club. 



Science Discovers Greatest 
Lice Killer 

Changes Olid Methods. No Dusting or Spraying. 
Birds Delouse Themselves. Gives Lasting Relief. 

A recent discovery promises to revolutionize 
all the methods accepted up to now for keep- 
ing the poultry free from lice and mites. 
This wonderful lice killer keeps the birds al- 
ways lioe free without the poultry raiser doing 
any work. It is the simplest, easiest, surest 
and best method ever discovered. 




Credit for this marvelous discovery goes to 
Chas. M. Hick, a Chicago chemist. Mr. Hick 
is already favorably known to the poultry 
world as the inventor of the famous Hick's 
Egg-Lay TabLets that make the hens lay. 

Hick's Licekill which is the name of this 
sensational Uce kUler is a liquid that is added 
to the drinking water (or the feed can be 
soaked in a solution of it). The medicine taken 
into the system of the bird comes out through 
the pores and every louse or mite dies or 
leaves the body. It does not injure the flavor 
of the eggs or meat and is harmless. A few 
days treatment at the start and then a little 
in the drinking water one or two days a month. 

So confident is Sir. Hick that this wonderful 
liquid wilL rid your flock of every louse or 
mite that he is offering every reader of this 
paper Ihe opportunity of trying it out with- 
out any risk. Send no monev, just your name 
and address to Chas. M. Hick & Co., 1018 So. 
Wabash Ave., Dept. 373. Chicago, 111., and two 
full size $1.00 bottles of this supreme lice re- 
mover will be sent you. Furthermore, as an 
exceptional offer, Mr. Hick will send you, at 
no additional cost, a regular $1.00 box of 
Hick's Egg-Lay Tablets used by thousands of 
poultry men. On delivery deposit with the 
postman $1.00 and postage. If after a two 
weeks trial you are not absolutely satisfied, 
write Mr. Hicks and your money will be im- 
mediately refunded. 



He has faith in the future of poultry 
and he ought to know. 

* * * 

It has been said that M. M. John- 
son the founder of the M. M. John- 
son Company, maker of the Old 
Trusty Incubators, started on a capi- 
tal of sixty-five cents. Today the 
company is one of the largest if not 
the largest in the world. There is a 
reason. 

* * * 

At the Hanover, Pennsylvania 
Fair, for the last three years, classes 
have been provided for boys' poul- 
try club display. We understand 
that this club has a membership of 
700 in a town of ten thousand. They 
are going at it right and it would be 
a good idea for the rest of us to 
wake up. The boys of today will be 
the fanciers of tomorrow and if we 
get them started right, the chances 

are they will keep going right. 

* * * 

Brother B. E. Adams has taken 
over the poultry department of Por- 
ter Military Academy near Charles- 
ton and is building up a real poultry 
farm. He is capable, thoroughly 
posted and with his enthusiasm 
things are sure to happen down that 
way. 

The Southeastern Fair Association 
of Atlanta, Georgia is going after the 
next meeting of the Southern District 
Rhode Island Red Club. It would 
only be right that Atlanta get this 
meeting and it goes without saying 
that she would show everyone a good 
time. 

* * * , 

We understand that the Belle City 
Incubator Company now pays the ex- 
press on all shipments east of the 
Rockies. That will mean a consid- 
erable saving to their customers and 
will mean quicker delivery. 

* % 

Three well known breeders of 
Rhode Island Reds have entered their 
fowls in the contest for 1922 at 
Storrs Agriculture College. They are 
Harold Tompkins, Owen Farms and 
Prospect Farms. This means a lot 
to the average breeder as we are 
proving that fine feathers can go 
with heavy production. 

The Hall Mammoth Incubator 
Company is out with an automatic 
egg turner. This should make the 
Hall even more popular. 

* 

Mr. A. F. Rolf, the efficient secre- 
tary of the National Single Comb 
White Leghorn Club is a candidate 
for Vice-President of the American 
Poultry Association. He has many 
friends and will make a strong 
showing. 

It is said that John I. Selden, 
Principal of the Bristol, Vermont 
High School has added a poultry 
study class to the Agriculture Course. 
Other schools should follow this ex- 
ample. 

(ontinued on Page 20) 



World's Foremost 

Poultry Feeding Secrets 

Most Remarkable Book on Feeds 

and Feeding Ever Published 

If you want to learn about the most success- 
ful feeding methods for poultry of all ages, 
ascertained after years of experimentation 
on the part of our best breeders and poultry 
experts ; the best feeding formulas used by 
the leading agricultural colleges in America; 
a formula for a standard egg producer that 
will turn any kind of hens, old. young, mon- 
grels or purebreds, into veritable egg ma- 
chines; and a great mass of other valuablo 
information on feeds and feeding — then you 
must have a copy of our latest book on poul- 
try feeding, "World's Foremost Poultry Feed- 
ing Stcrets." 

The one chapter giving a recipe for the Stand- 
ard Egg Producer is alone worth the cost of 
the book. 



50 Scrub Culls Produce 
35 Eggs Per Day 

To ascertain the effectiveness of the 
Standard Egg Producer the Standard 
Poultry Company of San Antonio. 
Texas, purchased fifty very low class 
mongrels, ages 2 to 4 years. The 
hens looked as though egg production 
were an impossibility with them. 
'When we began feeding Standard 
Egg Producer," reports the Standard 
Poultry Co., "they were not laying — 
not even one egg a day. In eighteen 
days after feeding them the Egg 
Producer they began laying, and at 
the end of sis weeks, their dailv 
average was 35 eggs. They held 
this high average until we sold them, 
several months later. We have tested 
the egg producer with purebreds and 
with mongrels and in even' case it 
produced a surprising increase in 
egg production." 



Standard Egg Producer Makes Any Class 
of Hens Lay in Any Season 

The Standard Egg Producer is a respector of 
no class of hens or seasons of the year. It 
will make scrubs lay in the winter just the 
same as purebreds in the spring. If used in 
connection with artificial lighting, the high 
egg yield would almost stagger the most 
skeptical. 

The formula tor Standard Egg Producer is 

invaluable to any person who keeps hens 

for profit, yet it takes up only one small 

chapter in our wonderful new book on poultry 

feeding. Some other subjects treated are: 

Kinds- of food necessary and their respective 
value — water, green feed, animal feeds, wet 
mash, dry mash, scratch grains, grit, oys- 
ter shell, milk, oats. 

How to obtain a balanced ration. 

How often and how much to feed. 

Housing poultry in various climates. 

Which is the best breed. 

Feed as important as breed. 

Poultry diseases. 

Profitable age of hens. 

How to select the non-layers. 

Artificial lighting to increase egg production. 

Commercial ready mixed feeds. 

How to market eggs. 

Why many poultry farms fail. 

Preserving eggs. 

Best methods of fattening poultry. 

Foremost egg producing rations. 57 formulas 
of scratch feed, dry mash, wet mash, etc., 
that have been found most successful by 
leading agricultural colleges. 

Feeding chicks. 

Best ' methods and formulas of home mttdo 
feeds for chicks at various ages — the first 
feed, starling foods, growing mash, feeding 
the first week, feeding the second week. 

How to feed turkeys. 

How to feed ducks and geese. 

Money-Back Guarantee 

This remarkable book will be sent prepaid 
for only $1.00 to any part of the world. It 
is sold on an absolute money-back guarantee — 
you are to be the judge. If not more than 
satisfied with the information the book con- 
tains, return it within five days and your 
dollar will be promptly refunded and no 
questions asked. Enclose a dollar bill at 
our risk and mail today. 

Poultry Breeders Publishing Co 
2314 E. Bremer Ave., Waverly, Iowa 
Sign and Mail Coupon Today 
■ ■■■■■BIISBII 

POULTRY BREEDERS PUB. CO., 
2314 E. Bremer Ave., Waverly, la. 
Gentlemen: I have enclosed ?1.00. Please 

send me your remarkable book, "World's 

Foremost Poultry Feeding Secrets," at once. 

If I am not satisfied with it after five days. 

I may return it and you will refund my 

money. 

ICamo 



Page Number 18 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



The Cause of White Diarrhea 

White Diarrhea is caused by the 
bacillus Bacterium Pullorum trans- 
mitted through the yolk. There is 
scarcely a hatch without some in- 
fected chicks. The germs multiply 
very rapidly and one infected chick 
may infect the entire brood. The 
germs can be killed by the use of 
preventives. Intestinal Antiseptics to 
kill the germs should be given as 
soon as the chicks are out of the 
shell. It is much easier to prevent 
than it is to cure. 



How to Prevent White Diarrhea 

Dear Sir: Last spring my .first incu- 
bator chicks when but a few days old 
began to die by the dozens with 
White Diarrhea. I tried different 
remedies and was about discouraged. 
Finally, I sent 50c to the Walker 
Remedy Co., Dept. 373, Waterloo, 
la., for a box of their Walko White 
Diarrhea Remedy. It's just the only 
thing for this terrible disease. We 
never lost a single chick after the 
first dose. We raised 700 thrifty, 
healthy chicks, where before we nev- 
er raised more than 100 a year. I'd 
be glad indeed to have others know 
of this wonderful remedy. Ethel 
Rhoades, Shenandoah, la. 



Don't Wait 

Don't wait until White Diarrhea gets half or 
two-thirds your chicks. Don't let it get started. 
Be prepared. Write today. Let us prove to you 
that Walko will prevent White Diarrhea. Send 
50e for box on our guarantee — money back if not 
satisfied. WALKER REMEDY CO., Dept. 373, 
Waterloo. Ia. 



LOOK chicks $9.50 a 100 

Aneonas, AVhite, Brown and But/ Leghorns 
$9.50 a 100. Barred and White Rocks, Rose 
and Single Comb Reds $10.00 a 100. Buff Or- 
pingtons, White and Silver Laced Wyandottes, 
Black Minorcas §14.50 a 100. White Minorcas, 
Cornish, Indian Games. Light Brahmas $16.00 
a 100. Supplies and price list free. 
HOUCKS LEGHORN FARM, Box 175, Tiffin, 0. 



"True Bar" 




"TRUE BAR" 

Plymouth Rocks 

Eggs for hatching. Thompson strain 
from 200 egg layers. Four splendid 
pens, both cockerel and pullet bred. 

BARRED 15 -S'^wS 

KUuIW Arkoe, Missouri 

Cured Her 

Rheumatism 

Knowing from terrible experience the suf- 
fering caused by rheumatism, Mrs. 3. E. Hurst, 
who lives at 508 E. Olive St.. B 6, Blooming- 
ton, IU., is so thankful at having cured her- 
self that out of pure gratitude she is an- 
xious to tell aU other sufferers just how to 
get rid of their torture by a simple way at 
home. 

Mrs. Hurst has notliing to sell. Merely cut 
out this notice, mail it to her with your 
own name and address, and she will gladly 
send you this valuable information entirely 
free. AVrite her at once before you forget. 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

(Continued from Page 18) 
I know of no way in which this 
meat may be preserved. The process 
of making meat scraps is by far too 
complicated and expensive to use on 
a small scale. If any of our readers 
have had experience along this line 
we will be glad to hear and pass 
their help along to R. R. M. 
Meat Scraps vs. Lard Cracklings. 

I have one of your books on feeding for eggs 
and note that it talks so well of meat scraps. 
I cannot get them but can get lard cracklings. 
Will it take the place of meat scraps? 

Mrs. S. J. G., Oklahoma. 

Lard cracklings will not exactly 
take the place of meat scraps as they 
are more fattening but we have used 
them and find that they will help 
out when meat scrap is hard to get. 
We especially like lard cracklings to 
put in the mash to fatten fowls and 
there is another idea for you to put 
down in your note book. 

The Germ in an Egg. 

Here is a question T would like to see an- 
swered in POULTRY KEEPER for the benefit 
of ignorant people like myself. I like POUL- 
TRY KEEPER better all the time. Is the 
little light circle on the yolk of the egg the 
germ or is it not? 

C. H. L., Missouri. 

The little white spot to which you 
refer is the resting place of the germ 
"but the germ is so small it cannot 
be seen with out the help of a high 
powered glass and while the white 
spot is present, yet there is no as- 
surance that the germ is present un- 
less it can be seen under a glass. 
So the presence of this little white 
disc does not prove the presence or 
absence of the germ which makes 
the egg capable of producing a chick. 
Do Chickens Pay. 

I would like to know whether chickens as 
usually kept on the back lot really pay for 
their feed, not to say anything about the work 
cif earing for them. Will you or your readers 
tell me? 

J. E. B., niinois. 

We have said Quite a little on this 
subject heretofore and we wish to 
put the answer squarely up to our 
readers. Will you write the Editor 
of this Department and tell us just 
what you have done? Give us facts 
and figures and we will put them up 
to J. E. B. and any others who may 
doubt that poultry pays. Will you 
help us? 



HATCHING AND REARING BABY 
CHICKS 

This is a new buletin just issued 
by the Division of Poultry Husbandry 
in Illinois and which will prove very 
valuable to poultry breeders. It 
gives special attention to the brood- 
ing and care of baby chicxs. Also 
special attention to their diseases 
such as White Diarrhea and Leg 
Weakness. It also has a chapter on 
Turke5 r raising and illustrates easily 
built brooder houses. One complete 
chapter is devoted to the "Feeds for 
Young Chicks." This bulletin is 
known as No. 309 and will be sent 
free of charge to all poultry raisers 
in the State of Illinois. Outside of 
Illinois it will be sent upon receipt 
of 6c to pay postage. — C. P. Scott, 
Chief Poultryman, Springfield, 111. 



The best care to give a setting hen 
is to leave her alone — she knows her 
business better than most men know 
it. 



WIPE OUT EVERY 
RAT AND MOUSE 



G. H. Williamson, A Country Mer- 
chant, Tells How He Saved 
Hundreds of Dollars. 

"There isn't a rat or mouse in the store 
since I put out Imperial Rat Virus. It cer- 
tainly does the work. It is so simple and 
inexpensive that I tell my neighbors there Is 
no excuse for being bothered any longer by 
these pests. I wiped them out of my store 
easily and quickly." 




Mr. Williamson goes on to say that lie had 
given up in dispair, after bein? incessantly 
bothered by these pests in the past, and hav- 
ing tried every known rat poison and appli- 
ance for the destruction or rats and mice. 
They only seemed to increase in numbers and 
were literally over-running his premises, when, 
one day Imperial Rat Virus was called to his 
attention, he decided that one more dollar 
should go into the purchase of something that 
offered a promise to solve the problem. "I 
want to tell you I was surprised and de- 
lighted with the work accomplished by this 
simple method," writes Mr. Williamson. "You 
can take my word for it, I have not seen a 
rat or mouse in my store since I put out Im- 
perial Rat Virus. 

EASY TO GET EVERY ONE 

IMPERIAL RAT VIRUS is the new discovery 
used by Mr. Williamson. It is not a poison 
and is absolutely harmless to humans, do- 
mestic animals, poultry, stock and household 
pets. It can be used anywhere with abso- 
lute safety. It is deadly only to rats, mice, 
gophers, ground squirrels, or any member of 
the rodent family. It is greedily eaten by 
them on bait, and sets up a burning fever, 
giving them a fatal disease which is trans- 
mitted to others through their cannibalistic 
habits; thus the entire colony- — root and branch 
— is soon exterminated. They die outside of 
the buildings, hunting air and water. 

YOU CAN GET YOURS FREE 

You are invited to write today, as Mr. AVill- 
iamson did, to the Imperial Laboratories, who 
are making a special Introductory Offer of two 
big regular, full-sized "double strength" $1.00 
lx>ttles for the price of one. Use one bottle 
to rid your own premises of these pests, and 
sell the other to a neighbor, thus getting yours 
free. Send only $1.00 (currency, money order 
or check-) and the two full-sized bottles of 
Imperial Rat Virus will be sent you postpaid. 

If more convenient, do not send any money, 
just your name and address, to the Imperial 
Laboratories, Dcpt .S0G, 2110 Grand Ave.. Kansas 
City. Mo., and pay the postman $1.00 and a 
few cents postage when the package arrives. 
It costs nothing if it does not do the work. 
The Imperial Lalx>ratories positively guarantee 
to refund your $1.00 within thirty days, if 
you are not satisfied with results. 



JERSEY 
B LAC K 
GIANTS 



AT MADISON SQUARE GARDEN, 1 9 2 2, 

In biggest classes ever shown, Marey Farms won 29 regular and many special prizes on single comb and pea 
comb Giants. At Newark — the Club meet — we won 14 regular prizes and many specials on single combs. This 
proves we have the world's greatest flock of this wonderful breed. Circular and price-list FREE. Catalog 
with illustrations and full description of the breed, 10 cents in silver. 



MARCY FARMS, 



Box K, 



Matawan, New Jersey 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 19 



Rid Hens & Chicks 
of Lice and Mites 



A Few Drops of Wonderful New 
Remedy in Drinking Water Does 
It. No Dusting, Spraying 
or Greasing. 




At this season of the year lice and 
mites cause many poor hatches. Set- 
ting hens infested with them will of- 
ten desert their nests at the most 
critical time. They sap the strength 
and vitality of baby chicks. Many dusts, sprays 
and dips are so strong that they often make 
eggs unhatchable. Greasing setting hens or 
baby chicks is disagreeable and unsanitary. 

A wonderful new dis- 
covery has recently 
been developed which 
makes it easy to keep 
the whole flock, es- 
pecially setting hens 
end baby chicks, ab- 
solutely free from all 
lice and mites. Just a 
few drops of Imperial 
Lice and Mite Remedy, 
given occasionally to 
fowls In drinking wa- 
ter, keeps them entire- 
ly free from all ver- 
min. It is a simple 
remedy in highly concentrated form and is 
guaranteed not to affect eggs or flesh of fowls 
in any way, Lioe, mites, ticks and other ver- 
min will not stay on any fowl when this re- 
markable remedy is used In their drinking wa- 
ter. It is also a splendid spring tonic and blood 
purifier for the entire flock. 

White Diarrhoea Remedy Free 

The manufacturers of Imperial Lice and Mite 
Remedy, in order to get it quickly established 
and widely used, are making a special intro- 
ductory offer; In connection with your order 
for a regular full size (double strength) $1.00 
bottle enough, to eliminate all lice and mites 
from the average flock and keep them free from 
this vermin, they wiU include free to you as an 
outright gift, your choice of either a regular 
si. 00 package of Imperial White Diarrhoea Rem- 
edy (the standard time tested remedy), or a 
large size $1.00 package of Imperial Egg Tonic, 
the guaranteed egg producer. In ordering, send 
only $1.00 (check, M. O. or currency) and state 
your selection. Both remedies sent postpaid. 

If more convenient, you. need send no money, 
.iust your name and address to the Imperial 
Laboratories, Dept 557, 2110 Grand Ave., Kansas 
City, Mo., and pay the postman $1.00 and a few 
cents postage when the package containing the 
two remedies arrives. As this offer may not 
appear again you should act at once, or clip for 
future reference. You need not hesitate in or- 
dering, as you risk no money. The manufac- 
turers guarantee to refund the cost any time 
within 30 days if you are not entirely satisfied. 



Royal Strain 



BUFF ORPINGTONS 

Hatching eggs $1.50, $3.00, $5.00, per 15. 
Every egg guaranteed fertile. My birds 
are consistent winners at state fair and 
Quincy. Order from this ad. 

K. W. HUEHNE 
311 South 10th St. Quincy, Illinois 

RICH BROTHERS 
S.C.WHITE LEGHORNS 

Eggs, Baby Chicks. High Quality 
Stock at a very reasonable price. 
Send for information. 

RICH BROTHERS 
R. P. D. 2, Elkhart, Ind. 

Cedar Ridge Poultry Farm 

The Home of The CHAMPIONS. 

Rose and Single Comb Rhode Island 
Whites, Single Comb Rhode Island 
Reds and Madagascar Bare-Necks. 
Write for Mating List. 

MRS. E. ALPHONSO & SON, 
Box 54, Union, Mo. 



FIGHT THE RAT- 



No other animal or insect is so 
dangerous and persistent an enemy, 
or inflicts so much damage upon 
humanity, as the common brown or 
gray rat. He destroys and injures 
vast quantities of grain, destroys 
young chicks, fruits, vegetables and 
flowers. He causes enormous losses 
in warehouses and freight terminals, 
is a menace both in cities and farm 
districts. 

The United States Department of 
Agriculture places the value of food 
and property destroyed yearly by 
each rat at $2. As the rat popula- 
tion easily equals the human popula- 
tion, the loss, due to rats, in this 
country alone, averages over $200,- 
000,000 annually. 

A frequenter of all places filthy 
aDd loathsome, the rat is also a con- 
stant menace to public healtn. He 
is a most efficient germ carrier; is 
not one bit particular where he 
places his disease-contaminated foot 
or snout. The germs of the dreaded 
"black death," which have killed 
more human things than all wars in 
the world's history, may be intro- 
duced into the human system by the 
bite of the rat flea. The bubonic 
plague, typhus, and other terrible di- 
seases are directly traceable to the 
rat. 

Thus, from the standpoint of pub- 
lic health, as well as from the necess- 
ity of preventing heavy drains upon 
the public purse, every good citizen 
should take part in the nation-wide 
campaign now under way to exterm- 
inate the rate. It pays to fight the 
rat. 



SINGLE COMB BUFF ORPINGTONS 



Walter H. Goessling, Quincy, 111., 
is advertising eggs at a splendid 
price in his ad which appears con- 
tinually in our classified columns. 
Mr. Goessling has been breeding 
Single Comb Buff Orpingtons for 
many years and stands back of his 
birds in every way. He has just 
published a new mating list which he 
will be glad to send free of charge 
to any of our readers who are in- 
terested in S. C. Buff Orpingtons. 
His birds were big winners at the 
Adams County Fair and also winners 
at the Quincy Quality Show. 



If Ruptured 
Try This Free 



Apply it to Any Rupture, Old or 
Recent, Large or Small and You 
are on the Road That Has 
Convinced Thousands. 



Sent Free to Prove This 

Anyone ruptured, man, woman or child, 
should write at once to W. S. Bice, 479A 
Maine St., Adams, N. Y., for a free trial 
of his wonderful stimulating application. 
Just put it on the rupture and the muscles 
begin to tighten; they begin to bind to- 
gether so that the opening closes naturally 
and the need of a support or truss is then 
done away with. Don't neglect to send 
for this free trial. Even if your rupture 
doesn't bother you what is the use of wear- 
ing a support all your life? Why suffer 
this nuisance? Why run the risk of gang- 
rene and such dangers from a small and 
innocent little rupture, and the kind that 
has thrown thousands on the operating ta- 
ble? A host of men and women are daily 
running such risk just because their rup- 
tures do not hurt nor prevent them from 
getting around. Write at once for this 
free trial, as it is certainly a wonderful 
thing and has aided in the cure of ruptures 
that were as big as a man's two fists. 
Try and write at once, using the coupon 
below. 



Free For Rupture 

W. S. Eice, Inc., 

479A Main St., Adams, N. Y. 
You may send me entirely free a 
Sample Treatment of your stimulating 
application for Rupture. 

Name _ _ 

Address 

State 



CHIC 

Hatched from pure bred se- 
lected heavy laying hens on 
free range and kept under 
proper conditions. The lead- 
ing popular varieties sent you 
right from the Incubator safe- 
ly by prepaid parcel post any- 
where and 100% live ar- 
rival guaranteed. We have 
been at it thirteen years. 
Write at once for our FREE 
ILLUSTRATED CATALOG 
describing our farm and con- 
taining much information that will prove of 
value to you. 

WECKEL BROS., Box 391K, Moline, Illinois 





20 varieties pure bred baby chicks bred 
for heavy egg production. Customers 
report pullets laying at 4 months, regu- 
lar egg machines, etc. 1,000,000 Miller 
chicks for delivery March, April, May 
and June via prepaid parcel post, 97% 
live delivery guaranteed. Satisfied 
customers in every state. 19th season, 
32-page catalog free. 



MILLER POULTRY FARMS 

BOX EESH LANCASTER, MISSOURI 



Page Number 20 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



TIMELY TOPICS 

(Continued from Page 17) 



Mr. C. S. Phelps, Homer, New 
York, has purchased a new farm con- 
sisting of 100 acres of fine gravel 
loam. Mr. Phelps will have more 
room now to raise his excellent Sing- 
el Comb White Leghorns. 

Mr. C. P. Scott, Peoria, Illinois, 
has informed his friends that he will 
not be a candidate for president of 
the American Poultry Association, at 
this time. Mr. Scott is a very able 
man and should he decide to make 
the run at some future period, we 
have no doubt that he would make 
a strong race. 

The Fourteenth Annual Purdue 
Egg Show will be held at Purdue 
University, West Lafayette, Indiana 
on May 1, 2, 3, 4. 

The American Poultry Advocate 
which has been so ably published for 
over thirty years by Clarence C. De- 
Puy, has been disposed of and will 
in the future be published by Will- 
iam H. Baigrie and Francher L. Mil- 
ler. We extend our best wishes to 
the new owners. 

It may surprise our readers to 
know that Harry M. Lamon, Senior 
Poultryman, Bureau of Animal In- 
dustry, U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture, has resigned his position and 
gone to the Oakdale Farms. There 
is no man better fitted to carry on. 
the work for Oakdale Farms and 
they are to be congratulated on se- 
curing his services. Mr. Lamon will 
find a warm welcome out here in the 
Middle West. It begins to look as 
if the poultry business were shifting 
to this section. 

Thos. F. Rigg, President of the 
American Poultry Association has 
called a meeting of the Standard Re- 
vision Committee and they will be- 
gin the task of revision. This is 
indeed a difficult work but much 
needed. 



Funk's International Strain Heavy 
Laying S. C. W. Leghorns 

Order hatching eggs or baby chicks now. My strain will save you 
4 to 5 years breeding. Pullets begin laying at five months and give 
profitable egg yields throughout the year. Hatching eggs $3.00 for 15, 
$15.00 per 100; $70.00 for 500; $125.00 for 1000. Baby chicks, 
$35.00 per 100; $30.00 per 100 in lots of 500; $27.00 per 100 in 
lots of 1000 or more. 

EXTRA large full blood Toulouse breeding Ganders $7.50 each. A 
few good $7.00, Grade A cockerels left. 



Send for my free catalog and 1922 price list, 
on all orders or money refunded. 



Satisfaction guaranteed 



FUNK EGG FARM 



Lyle W. Funk, Sole Owner, 



Box 500, 



Bloomington, Illinois 



Fire swept the poultry plant of 
Mr. C. S. Besuden, the bantam 
breeder, completely destroying build- 
ings and stock. The loss of the 
buildings alone was $4,000 and the 
value of the 300 head of stock can- 
not be estimated. We regret to hear 
of this loss. 

Frank C. Hare who has been in 
the poultry development work for 
War Department has now gone into 
business for himself. He is selling 

poultry supplies. 

* » * 

Fred W. Smith has taken a posi- 
tion with Wm. Shands, Little Rock, 
Missouri and we expect to see some- 
thing doing down that way. 



TURKEYS: THEIR CARE AND MANAGEMENT 

Some of the most successful breeders and com- 
mercial growers in the country tell of the 
methods by which they have accomplished their 
successes, and what they hare done others also 
can do. If you raise turkeys in any number, 
this book will be worth many times its price 
to you. 

Beautifully illustrated, one color plate, 96 
pages, 9 by 12 inches. Price 75c postpaid. 
Address Poultry Keeper. Quincy. Illinois. 




Planet Jr. 




Keep the kitchen 
garden growing 

When plowing, planting - and early harvesting- are press- 
ing-, a Planet Jr. No. 17 Sing-le Wheel Hoe is a. life-saver 
for the kitchen garden. Half-an-hour a day with this lig"ht, 
strong-, quick-working- hoe and cultivator keeps your veg- 
etable patch flourishing and free of weeds. When man- 
labor can't be spared, a woman or boy can easily 
do all the garden work with a No. 17, so easily 
and lightly does it run. Soon pays for itself in 
just the labor it saves. 

Write for your copy of the Planet Jr. catalog, showing 
more than 55 Planet Jr. seeders, wheel 
hoes, one-horse and riding cultivators, etc. 

S. L. ALLEN & CO., Inc. 

Dept. 96 

5th & Glenwood Avenue PHILA. 




No. 17 



RAISE RH00E ISLAND REDS 

-HE B ES T A L L P U R P 0 S E BREED 



Your name and address will bring free 
educational literatureonRhode Island 
Reds and information why they are 
the greatest money-making' poultry 
breed; also catalogs and circulars from 
leading Red breeders. For full informa- 
tion address *" 
RHODE ISLAND RFI> CXUB of AMERICA 
W. IT.Card, Sec, Box 914 , Manchester. Conn. 
This ad paid for by C. P. Scott, Peoria, HI. 




Poultry Leg Bands 

THE "BEST YET"- ALUM 'NUM. 
Not colored. Will stay on. i.2 20c 
26. 30c: 50. 50c: 100. 90.J. State 
breed. 

CELLULOID SPIRAL BANDS. 
Red. Green, Amber. Pink. Black, 
White. Yellow, Purple, Light Blue. 
Dark Blue. Ruby, Cerise. 

12 25 50 100 250 



Baby Chicks. Pigeons.. $.10 $.20 $.35 $ .60 $1.35 $2.25 



Growing Chicks 15 

Leghorns, Anconas . . .20 .35 .50 .90 

Hocks. Reds, etc. . . .20 .40 .60 1.00 

Asiatics 25 .45 .75 1.20 

Turkeys. Geese 30 .50 .85 1.40 

At 




2.25 
2.75 

3.: 



4.00 
5.00 
6.00 



uminum Marker Works. Dept. 13 Beaver Fail*, Pa. 



FOR THOSE WHO CAN USE HAM- 
MER AND SAW 



Huilt and Used by Poulti •ymeim 
Is a 96-page book; paper bound; con- 
tains 108 illustrations, fully describ- 
ing \arious styles of poultry houses 
for the large farm, as well as the 
back yard. Poultry house equipment, 
including roosts, trap-nests, food box- 
es and hoppers, drinking founts, fenc- 
es, both permanent and moveable; 
metal fence posts, brooders, both 
fireless and heated; brood-coops, 
covered chick yards, poultry catchers, 
the popular stove-pipe hopper, and 
many other useful appliances that 
can be made at home and money 
saved. For the man who enjoys 
making his own' poultry appliances, 
building his own coops, houses, etc., 
this book is of especial value. La- 
bor-saving and money-saving devices 
are fully explained and illustrated 
so that the man who can use a ham- 
mer and saw can make any of them. 
Price 50 cents. Address Poultry 
Keeper, Qnincy, Illinois. 



MAKE UP A CLUE 

etub of your own, choosing the 
you want to take. Write 
quote a special cut price. I can 
save yon considerable money on your subscrip- 
tion*.' A. Dl is Arnold. Quinc y, Illinois. 



.\lnk.' up 
jmpers or magazines 
and let m 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 21 



A WORD FROM PRESIDENT RICJG 



Fort Wayne, Ind., March 1±, 1922. 
To the Members of the American 
Poutry Association: 

I am a candidate for re-election 
for President of the American Poul- 
try Association. Since my inaugura- 
tion last August I have given my en- 
tire time and attention to the busi- 
ness of the Association. I am at my 
desk here at head-quarters every 
day serving as best I can the men 
and women who are interested in the 
breeding, selling, and showing of 
Standard-Bred fowls, and promoting 
the interest of the Association and 
safe-guarding its welfare. This is 
without cost whatever to the Associ- 
ation. 

The conduct of affairs of the 
American Poultry Association is a 
business proposition pure and sim- 
ple, and is of such magnitude and 
importance that it demands the en- 
tire time and attention and the best 
efforts of the Association's respons- 
ible head. 

Bear in mind that I have been in 
office but seven short months. That 
is far too short a time in which to 
bring out all the important and need- 
ful changes. However much has been 
accomplished for all concerned. 

I stand squarely upon the plat- 
form as set forth in my inaugural 
address. I have no further promises 
to ask. Not one, I would like to be 
given the opportunity to carry to con- 
clusion the policies I have inaugu- 
rated. I ask that as a matter of 
justice and fairness I be given the 
chance to do this. The very large 
majority given me in the nominating 
ballot is conclusive evidence that the 
members of the Association believe 
in the principle of the square deal. 
I ask the privilege of further serving 
you to the best of my ability. 

Theo P. Rigg. 



HOW TO TELL THE LAYERS 



"OCULUM" users quickly locate 
the "none-layers". "OCULUM" 
makes the "non-layer" fat as butter 
in short order, and makes the layer 
shell out the eggs. For 15 years 
"OCULUM" has given satisfaction to 
its users all over the United States. 

Send the "OCULUM" Co., Salem, 
Va., 10c and get a sample — They'll 
treat you right. 



SUCCESSFUL BACK-YARD POULTRY 
KEEPING 



A new one just off the_ press. Tells every- 
thing you need to know about poultry keeping 
on a small scale to insure success. The largest, 
most, complete and down-to-date hook on the 
subject ever published. Will turn failure into 
success and is an invaluable guide to any be- 
ginner. 

Every person who is keeping fowls on a 
small scale or is planning to do so — everyone 
who wants to learn about the latest practical 
methods adapted to back-yard conditions — will 
want this big, truly helpful book. Every im- 
portant phase of the subject is covered in the 
seventeen chapters contained within its pages, 
from the laying out of the plant to the use of 
artificial illumination — the new method that 
positively doubles and more than doubles fall 
and winter production. Whether you are in- 
terested in poultry keeping simply to produce 
a supply of eggs for home use or as a money- 
making side line, you need this practical down- 
to-date book. 

"Successful Back-Yard Poultry Keeping" 
contains 104 pages, 8% by 12 inches, over 100 
Illustrations and a beautiful three-color art cover 
by Schilling. Price $1.00, postpaid. Address, 
Poultry Keeper, Quincy, Illinois. 



"THE LAYERS WIN AND THE WIN NERS LAY" 

REGAL DORCAS 
WHITE WYANDOTTES 

are the most popular strain of this popu- 
lar breed in America today, because they 
combine beauty and usefulness to such a 
marked degree. 

Regal Dorcas White Wyandottes are 
the typical American White Wyandottes, 
not the slim-bodied, high-tailed, beefy- 
combed kind that are Wyandottes in 
name only. My birds are the modern 
kind with low, close-fitting combs, deep 
bay eyes, rich yellow legs, broad backs, 
low well-spread tails and chalk white 
plumage. 

In the laying contests they are invari- 
ably near the top while in the show 
room they acknowledge no superiors. 
They hold their record for best display at Boston with a score of 72 
points. 

At Madison Square Garden, 1919, they won best display with a 
score of 68 points — 40 points more than all my competitors combined, 

At the National White Wyandotte Club Meet held in Kansas City, 
Nov., 192 0, the Regals won 43 ribbons on 43 entries — the most won- 
derful winning in the history of the breed. 

In the American Laying contest at Leavenworth, Kansas, my birds 
won first over all the heavy weight varieties, eight of my pullets mak- 
ing a combined record of 1,761 an average of over 220 per bird. 

If you are not getting good results in fertility or egg production, 
if your birds are weak in constitution, why not make a fresh start 
with the Regal Dorcas line? My matings for 1922 are a wonderful 
success and the 2,000 early chicks in my brooder house give, ample 
proof of this. Do not delay, but reserve your eggs before it is too late. 




EGGS FOR HATCHING 

Dorcas Matings — £5.00 per 15, 
$15.00 per" 50, $27.00 per 
100'. 

Special Matings (Exhibition or 
Dorcas) — $10.00 per 15, 
$18.00 per 30, $25.00 per 45, 
$50.00 per 100. 



All-Star Mati"gs- 
$25.00 per 15. 



-$20.00 and 



Utility 

100. 



Matings — $15.00 per 



Special Utility Matings- 
per 100. 



520.00 



1000 SURPLUS MALES 
AND FEMALES FOR 
IMMEDIATE SALE AT 
BARGAIN PRICES 

Special Value Breeding Pens, 

(Male and five females) — 
$40.00, $50.00, $75.00, and 
$100.00. 

Choice Breeding Cockerels — 

$8.00, $10.00, $15.00, 
$20.00, and $25.00. 

Hens and Pullets — $5.00, 

.$8.00, and $10.00. 
Utility Cockerels — $5.00 each. 



FREE — Send for 2 0-Page Cata- 
logue, fully illustrated, telling 
all about my 192 2 Matings. 



Send 10c for copy of the Regal 
White Wyandotte Book — the 
information it contains will be 
of great value to you. 



Jonn S. Martin, BOX 408 Port Dover, Ont., Can. 



Page Number 22 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



SPRING VALLEY BUFF ORPINGTONS 

Blue Ribbon Winners: 



R. D. HERLEMAN, 



Illinois State Show, 
State Fair and Illinois 
Egg Laying Contest. 

R. 4, 



REDUCTION ON THESE PRICES AFTER APRIL 15TH. 

$10, $7.50; $5 per 15. Every egg guaranteed fertile. Range 
eggs $20 per 200, $12 per 100, $2.50 per 15. Limited number 
baby chicks. Order early. 

Box P. K., Quincy, Illinois 



Eggs- 




f^onkeus 

y TRAOE MARK ^^^f 

The Original 

Buttermilk s « s 

It prevents the big losses due to weak- 
ness and disease and gives your chicks that 
quick start that insures early broilers and 
layers. 

It helps to prevent White Diarrhea, as the 

lactic acid in the buttermilk acts as an "intestinal 
broom," helping to sweep away unfriendly bacterial 
disease germs in the digestive tract. 

Conkey's is the only Buttermilk Starting 
Feed made by the original Conkey process that has 
bsen so successful. We use Semi-Solid Buttermilk 
only. Low in 6bre and ju3t right in protein. Clean, 
sweet and genuine. No mill ends, shriveled or un- 
sound grain, weed seed or mill sweepings used— only 
the best and purest grain. Yet it costs so little for 
those first 8 weeks no poultryman can afford to be 
without it. 

Don't Break the Conkey Chain of Butter- 
milk Feeds — one each for Starting, Growing and 
Laying. . 

Be sure to get Conkey's Feeds and Remedies m the 
original packages. Sold by dealers. Big Poultry 
Book for 6c stamps. (77) 

The G. E. Conkey Co. «8SifiB!ftHio 



MAKING EGGS IS 

WILMOT'S 

W. LEGHORN'S TRADE 

They are just like a man who has learned 
a trade he seldom does anything else, that 
is the way with our S. C. White Leghorns 
they seldom do anything but lay those big, 
white eggs. 

TRAP NESTED BRED-TO-LAY 

females that will bring profits to everyone 
who keeps them, they are workers, every 
one doing her share in keeping the egg bas- 
ket full. 

BABY CHICKS AND 

HATCHING EGGS 

from birds that work 14 hours a day at 
their trade. Send for circular which de- 
scribes them. 

Wilmot's AVhite Leghorn Farm, 

Box K. Elyria, Ohio 



BARRED ROCK BABY CHICKS 



j White Wyandottes 

I of Exhibition quality. Eggs to 
spare from 4 grand pens. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. 

Fred Berlin, Allen, Mich. 



LEE'S LICE KILLER 

Kills lice, mites, bed bags. etc... affecting poultry. Spray or 
paint on roosts, etc. Gets body lice on chickens, too. W?rU3 
while they sleep. No dusting, dipping, greasing or handling. 
Saves lot of unpleasant work. At most towns, at stores handling 
Lee Poultry Supplies. Writ© for information and FREE Book. 
GEO. H. LEE CO., Dept. P20. OMAHA, NEBR. 




SKS WEDDING RING 

names of your neighbors and ten cents 
to pay postage &c. 

Cem City Supply Co., QUINCY, ILL. 



We want to call particular atten- 
tion of our Barred Rock breeders to 
the ad of Fred S. Yunker, Dakota, 
Illinois, which appears in this issue. 
He is making a special announcement 
on Barred Rock Baby Chicks and 
guarantees his customers that they 
will be more than pleased with any 
purchase they make from him. We 
know Mr. Yunker is absolutely re- 
liable and Barred Rock breeders will 
make no mistake in consulting him. 



LEGHORNS AND RHODE ISLAND 
REDS 



Breeders of S. C. White Leghorns 
and S. C. Rhode Island Reds who are 
looking for new blood will do well 
to read the ad of A. J. Baumann, 
Proprietor High View Poultry Farm 
Quincy, Illinois, which appears in this 
issue. Mr. Baumann has a splendid 
flock that has made quite a reputa- 
tion for egg laying. He is offering 
eggs for hatching at very attractive 
prices and will send his mating list 
free to any reader who is interested. 



SAVE EVERY CHICK 



Now is the time to guard against 
the loss o'f little chicks through 
White Diarrhoea. In many flocks 
this disease gets started and practic- 
ally destroys the entire brood before 
any effect can be made to stop it. 
Many poultry men keep a bottle of 
GERMICIL on hand for use in such 
cases and GERMICIL has proven 
effective not only for diarrhoea but 
also for Roup, Limberneck and other 
poultry diseases. The formula em- 
braces the finest tonics, laxatives, 
blood purifiers and bowel regulators 
known to medicine. GERMICIL is 
a liquid which may be used in the 
drinking water. This makes is es- 
pecially desirable for young chicks. 
Price, 1 bottle $1.00; 3 bottles $2.50, 
postpaid. American Supply Co., 
Dept. P. K., Quincy, 111. 



Sick Baby Chicks? 

Germozone operates just as these people say. 
It is preventive as well as curative, and satis- 
faction is absolutely guaranteed. Twenty years 
on the market. Sold by drug and seed stores 
at most towns. 

Wm. E. Shepherd, Scranton, Pa., wrote: "Two 
weeks after we started last spring we were a 
might}- discouraged pair. Every day from three 
to six chicks dead. A neighbor put us next to 
Germozone and we are now sure if we had had 
it at the start we would not have lost a single 
chick." Ralph Wurst, Erie, Pa., — "Not a case 
of white diarrhoea in three years." C. O. Pe- 
train, Moline, 111. — "I never had a sick chick 
all last season." Mrs. Wm. Christiana, OUve 
Ridge, N. Y. — "Have 800 chicks now 5 weeks 
old and not a single case of bowel trouble." 
fr'Fl'R'IvTOZONE is a wonder worker for 
uxjxvj.uvuvj.ixj chiekS) chickens, pigeons. 

cats, dogs, rabbits or other pet or domestic stock 
— for roup, bowel trouble, snuffles, gleet, cank- 
er, swelled head, sore head, sores, wounds, loss 
of fur or feathers. 

If no dealer, order by card. Postma.i M ill col- 
lect. No extra charge. Handy as 'phoning. 73c 
and $1.50 pkgs. Baby chick Book FREE. 

Geo. H. Lee Co., Dept. P-20 Omaha, Neb. 

Barred Rock 

Baby Chicks 

And AU Other Standard Varieties. 

I make a specialty of Barred Rock chicks and 
I can guarantee my customers that they will 
be more than satisfied if they order chix from 
me, as I keep nothing but the choicest of 
birds in my flocks, and they are culled each 
year for high egg production. Every customer 
ordering from me must be satisfied or money 
will be cheerfully refunded. Barred Rock 
chicks §16.50 per hundred. 

FRED YUNKER, Dakota, Illinois 

STORMONT'S BARRED ROCKS 
—DEFEAT ALL BREEDS- 

in First Illinois Laying Contest, by winning 
first pen, first, third and fifth highest layers. 
These facts speak volumes for my strain. Write 
for mating list. 

Rev. A. C. Stomiont, Auxvasse, Mo. 

Chick Bands 

latest, best, can't 
cut legs, green, yel- 
low, black, white, 
red, blue, 100-95c, 
Adult spirals 100-95c 
LIBERTY BAND CO., Box £, Belleville, III. 




Holemeyer's S. C. White Leghorns 

Order your eggs for hatching early from my heavy layers and prize win- 
ners. Won 15 prizes at 3 shows including 5 firsts. Eggs $2.50 for 15, 
$4.00 for 30, $6.00 per 50, $10.00 per 100. Mating list free. 
WHITE ROSE POULTRY FARM, R. R. No. 4, Box 31, Quincy, 111. 

Why Not Get REAL TOM BARRON Leghorn Chicks and Eggs 

from a firm that has imported direct each year since 1915, at prices but 
little higher than the Commercial Hatcheries charge for common stock. 
Chicks $20.00 per 100, $16.00 per 100 after June 1st. Eggs $12.00 per 100 
with free replacement of all non fertiles. Orders filled promptly from this 
ad or send for descriptive list to 

COLEMAN MILES EGG FARM, Importers. Box N, Mt. Carroll, 111. 




750,000 for 1922. All best Quality stock, lowest prices. 

Best Leghorn laying stock. Assorted, Barred Rocks, White Rocks, Reds, An- 
conas, Minorcas, White Wyandottes. Buff Orpingtons of pure bred stork. We 
pay postage and ship annvhere. 95% alive delivery guaranteed. FREE CATA- 
LOG and price list. WRITE US TODAY. 



UNIVERSAL BABY CHICK CO. 



Peoria, Illinois 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 2 3 



STORMONT'S BARRED ROOKS 



FOR THOSE WHO CAN USE HAMMER AND 
SAW 



The fame achieved by the Barred 
Rocks of A. C. Stormont, Auxvasse, 
Mo., in last year's Illinois Egg Lay- 
ing contest is certainly wide spread. 
The wonderful record made by his 
birds has brought him an unusually 
large trade. Naturally any Barred 
Rock breeder that want to get blood 
from a strain that can win first in 
the Illinois Egg Laying contest will 
do well to get in touch with Mr. 
Stormont. 



WILMOT'S WHITE LEGHORNS 



In another column of this issue 
will be found the advertising of the 
Wilmot White Leghorn Farm. This 
is successor to the "Star-light Poul- 
try Farm." Mr. Wilmot's Leghorns 
are trapnested and bred to lay. It 
is the hen that lays that makes the 
profit and in buying Leghorns that 
is the one thing that must receive 
careful attention. Mr. Wilmot is of- 
fering baby chicks and eggs for 
hatching at very reasonable prices. 
He will be glad to send circular free 
on request from any of our readers. 



RHODE ISLAND WHITES 



Elsewhere in this issue appears 
the ad of Mrs. E. Alphonso, Union, 
Mo., who is advertising Rhode Island 
Whites. She is manager of the Ce- 
dar Ridge Poultry Farm and Secre- 
tary of the Rhode Island White Club 
of America. She is a real live boost- 
er of Rhode Island Whites and those 
who desire to get a start with this 
really worth while breed should 
write her at once. 



Uncle Ab says: There's one laugh 
that hurts the face, and that's at 
the misfortunes of others. 



Next year's farm income tax will 
be simplified by the use of farm ac- 
count books. Your county agent 
has 'em. 



THE PLYMOUTH ROCKS 



By William C. Denny 



This complete breed book explains standard 
requirements and tells how to select, mate and 
exhibit winners in all varieties. Subjects of 
special importance to Plymouth Rock breeders, 
such as how to get correct barring in Barred 
Rocks, "Stay-white" plumage in White Rocks, 
correct, uniform color in Buffs, double mating, 
line breeding, strain building, etc., all are 
plainly and fully treated. 

Well illustrated, including three color plates, 
144 pages, 9 by 12 inches. Price $1.00 postpaid. 
Address Poultry Keeper, Quincy, Illinois. 



S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS 



The World's GREATEST Layers 

Biggest money makers on earth Leg- 
horn eggs bring highest market price, 
gullets begin laying sooner, hens con- 
tinue laying longer than any other 
breed. Only 20% go broody. Profitable 5 
years.then make choice delicious meat. 
Most beautiful, most popular fowl on 
earth. Ideal for farm or city lot. or 
commercial poultryman or farmer. 

The Leghorn World ? n n & 0 rid r de a - 

voted exclusively to Leghorns. Tells 
u w to maho b 'B money with them 
. —how to buy, sell, get greatest pleas- 
ure, most profit-everything you want to know about 
Leghorns. Published monthly, 50c yr.— 3yrs. $1. 
't5^?5^5, , "S,* b "^ , 8 - 5- *5«».lMS»ni»" remarkable book 
Ini JKJUS." 1 '} 1 *- J ^ Se - i°" A - cul J- D re P» r « for show, sell 
fllh^w^U ^-t,'HX°''J™*S" th S year subscription to 
Leghorn World at $1.00. Send dollar bill today 

THE LEGHORN WORLD. 6114 Bremer Ave.. Wwcrfy, Iowa 




Built and Used by Poultry-men 



Is a 9G-page book; paper bound; contains 108 
Illustrations, fully describing various styles of 
poultry houses for the large farm, as well as 
the back yard. Poultry house equipment, In- 
cluding roosts; trapnests, food boxes and hop- 
pers; drinking founts; fences, both permanent 
and movable; metal fence posts; brooders both 
fireless and heated; broodcoops; covered chick 
yards; poultry catchers, the popular stove-pipe 
hopper, and many othe useful appliances that 
can be made at home and money saved. For 
the man who enjoyes making his own poultry 
appliances, building his own coops, houses, etc., 
this book Is of especial value. Labor-saving and 
money-saving devices are fully explained and 
Illustrated so that the man who can use a ham- 
mer and saw can make any of them. Price 50 
cents. Address Poultry Keeper, Quincy, IMnola. 



LEG BANDS 

All guaranteed-Any size h 
ALUMINUM BANDS r 
with raised figures, z 
price postpaid, 10-15c,;f> 
25-25c, 50-35C, 100-60C. 1 
ECONOMY colored 

celluloid with 





aluminum back. 

Any color, two large black num- 
bers In each band, prices 12-30c, 
25-50c, 50-80C, 100-?1.50, 
Makers of 25 different styles of 
of LEG & WING bands. 
The National Poultry Band Co. 
Send for catalog. Newport, Ky. 



Free-ConAeys Poultrq Book 



80 pages chock full of information about the feeding and 
rearing of chicks, culling of hens, etc. Tells how to keep 
chickens healthy and how to make them pay. Whether 
a beginner or a professional, Conkey's Book is worth 
dollars to yon. Sent for 6 cents in stamps to pay postage. 
THE C. E. CONKEY CO. 6542 BroadKII, UtxtUti. Obit 



wh jT s CAPON $!? ? 

A book that explains why Capons are the most profitable part of the poultry business and everything 
you will ever want to know about CAPONS. 50 pictures from life that show each step in the 
operation. List of Capon Dealers' addresses. Tells how to prevent "Slips," where to get the 
best and cheapest capon tools. Capons are immense eating. Big profits realized. Get wise". This 
book tells how. Copyrighted new and revised edition. Regular 50c copy, prepaid to your address 
(a short time only) for a Dime in coin or stamps. 

GEORGE BEUOY, R. R. 17, CEDAR VALE, KANSAS. 



EGGS — S. C. White Leghorns &S. C. Rhode Island Reds— EGGS 

We are offering hatching eggs from birds that have proven show winners 
last year and every one of which has a high egg laying record. We are mak- 
ing attractive prices and will go the limit to see that you get satisfactory 
service. Our mating list is free. Write for a copy at once. 

HIGHVIEW POULTRY YARDS, 
A. J. Bauman, Prop. 628 Jackson St., Quincy, Illinois 



Melrose Farm Reds 

Won 2nd place in Minois Egg Laying Contest in February and with their winning records in the 
show rooms of Illinois and elsewhere should convince you, that we have what you want in 
Single Comb Rhode Island Reds. Eggs from the same blood lines as the winners at the 
Egg Laying Contest at $8.00 per 100. Order from this ad. 



JOE WELLMAN, 



R. R, 4, 



Quincy, Illinois 




CHICKS 



English Strain heavy laying S. 
C. W. Leghorns, $19.00 per 100. 
American Strain, $15.00 per 100. 
Parks Strain heavy laying Barred 
Rocks, $19 per 100. Select heavy laying Barred Rocks, $15 
per 100. ORDER NOW, RIGHT FROM THIS AD. Circular 
Free. 

DALLENBACH POULTRY FARM, Box K, Bondville, 111. 




The "OLD RELIABLE 

Ohio Hatchery. 



W E A RE 
PIONEERS 



In the business of Hatching and Selling Chicks. For 22 Years we 
have been furnishing the public with High Class Chicks which have 
proven So Satisfactory that 60 per cent of our business Is now from 
old customers. Uhl Hatchery Chicks are produced from select, heavy 
laying hens on free range and are strong and vigorous. 
Reasonable Prices, 100% Live Delivery Guaranteed. 
By Prepaid Parcel Post. Leading Varieties. Get our 1922 Catalog 
before buying Chicks. 

The Uhl Hatchery, Box K, New Washington, Ohio 



ScottsSX.Reds 

WIN BEST DISPLAY 

Illinois State Poultry Show, Freeport, HI., Jan 5, to 8. They 
have made many good wins in the hands of customers. 

'TIS A MARK OF DISTINCTION to breed Scott's Reds. Four 
females in egg laying contest, Storrs, Conneticut, layed 840 
eggs in one year, an average of 210 eggs each. If Interested 
write for mating list. 



C. P. SCOTT, 



Box M, 



PEORIA, ELL. 




Page Number 24 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 




COUND business principles demand 
that you raise every raisable chick 
you hatch. The brooder that does this is the one that makes your real profits. 

Hundreds of thousands all over the world have learned by experience to 
place their reliance on 



They perform to perfection, preventing crowding, overheating and chilling. 
They have revolutionized the Taising of chicks, saving many thousands every 
year. Success is sure to follow their use. 

Supplied for coal, gas or oil under a guarantee of absolute satisfaction cr 
the money back. Buckeye Lamp-heated Brooders care for the smaller lots. 

The reasons for this unqualified success are found in our new booklet. "The Revolution 
in Chick Raising." Any Buckeye dealer will be glad to supply this, or we will mail a copy 
free from any of our offices. Ask for it today. 

The Buckeye Incubator Company 

615 Euclid Avenue, ^ ^£j %Z!Z ? « Springfield, Ohio 

Foreign Offices: Herblay. S.& O., France. York Road, King's Cross. N. 1. 
London. England. P. O, Box 907, Durban, South Africa. 



Winners at Chicago, Memphis, Illinois State Show. 

At Illinois State Fair in August, I entered 3 cockerels in a class of 4 6 and 
won First and Third. 



30 FINE EXHIBITION COCKERELS 



that will win at good shows for sale. Also Exhibition Pullets 
and Hens. For over 25 years I have bred and shown Barred 
Rocks and for 20 years I have judged them In some of the best shows of the country. I know 
what good Rocks are and I have them. Satisfaction guaranteed. JTTLITJS J. KLEIN, Macon, 111. 

Iowa's Leading Hatchery 

^ H B ^ IC ^ From High Class, Heavy Laying parents, kept on free range 
wrllWlVO and in the best health in 

ROCKS, REDS, WYANDOTTES, LEGHORNS, ETC. 

Shipped safely anywhere. 100% live arrival guaranteed. Get our FREE IL 
LUSTRATED CATALOG FOR 1922 which gives prices and full particulars and 

tells you HOW TO RAISE THEM. 

Get your orders In early and avoid the rush which ALWAYS comes later In 
the season. Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

KING HATCHERY, Box R, Iowa City, la. 




BRED TO WIN AND LAY 

HORNER'S PEDIGREED S. C. REDS 

Cockerels for Sale. We can furnish you with Show birds, or strong fine breeders, $5.00 and 
np. At Illinois State Fair, 1st Pen, in a hot class of 17 pens, also 2nd Pullet in a class 
of 47. Adams County Fair, Cockerels, 1, 3, 4, 5; Pullets, 1, 2, 3, 4,; and Pens 1, 2; Champion 
Pen; Champion Pullet. Pen mated. Write for matting list. 

ERNEST G. HORNER, R. R. 7. Quincy, Illinois 





In Browtr's Sa»e-«ll Chick and Egg Boies. (Formerly Called Rlppley) 
Made of strong corragated card board. Stand 
weight of 6ve men. Sold in Dozen Lots Only 



EGG BOXES-size 15-egg, $1 75; 30-egg. $2.60; 60-egg. 
$3.45: 100-egg. $5.60 doz. CHICK BOXES-25-size, 
$1.25; 60-size, $1.75; 100-Bize, $2 40 doz. Sample 
16-egg or 25-chick box. SSc. Postpaid. Save 
delay — order from adv. Write for Catalog of 
Poultry Supplies Special discounts on large orders. 
BR0WER MANUFACTURING CO., Box 160 GRAFTON, ILL. 




THE POULTRY BREEDER'S GOAL 



There are styles in poultry breed- 
ing just as there are styles in men's 
clothing, or in farming implements. 
This changing of style has been go- 
ing on with a rapidity during the last 
twenty years that is almost bewild- 
ering. 

Those of you who remember the 
high-backed and high-tailed fowls of 
twenty years ago cannot fail to ap- 
preciate the truth of this statement 
when you compare them with the 
low-tailed compact farm hen of to- 
day. Fifteen years ago today the 
mongrel hen seemed to be more of 
a favorite than the purebred hen, 
judging by the number with which 
they were kept. Today it is the un- 
common thing to find a mongrel 
flock, the pure bred flock is the gen- 
eral rule. 

Those who are watching the trend 
in poultry breeding, as all who are 
interested in the profits from the 
flock should, are no doubt wondering 
where the matter is going to end. 
.What is the goal of the present-day 
breeding of poultry? Is it to end in 
a hopeless fad, as did the breeding of 
fowls two generations ago, or is it 
going to result in something of dis- 
tinct worth to the farmer and his 
needs? 

The government poultry investiga- 
tors and experts are answering that 
question today, for they have, thanks 
to their sworn interest in the farm 
hen, so anchored poultry breeding in 
utility and farm values that they 
have kept the drift from running 
amuck in the dangerous shoals of 
faddism. 

For years there has admittedly 
been two camps among poultry 
breeders; those who were breeding 
for fine feathers, or fanciers, and 
those who didn't care a rap about 
the feathers but were after eggs or 
meat, or utility cranks, as they were 
called. 

Some of the utility breeders, in 
their anxiety to get high producing 
egg-flocks paid absolutely no atten- 
tion to the Standard of Perfection 
as adopted by the American Poultry 
Association and took any old hen 
that happened to have a good trap- 
nest record and bred from her. The 
result was that, from the standpoint 
of the fancier, most utility flocks 
were nothing but a flock of culls or 
mongrels, irrespective of the fact 
that they might all have the pure 
blood of a single breed in their veins. 

The utility men, on their side, 
were likewise disgusted at the fad- 
dish traits of the fancier who foolish- 
ly were after feathers and appear- 
ance and didn't seem to give a con- 
tinental whether their hens laid eggs 
or not so long as they pulled down 
the ribbons at the shows each year. 

This spirit of bitterness between 
the two camps was naturally more 
of a blow to poultry progressiveness 
than it was an aid, for it tended to 
split the two factions wide open and 
there seemed to be no opportunity of 
the real poultry breeders ever uniting 
them all to a common purpose, name- 
ly, the production of a breed of hens 
that would hold their own in the 
show room and in the trap-nest 
equally well. 

The gap has been bridged by the 
federal government poultry experts 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 25 



working at the Maryland farm, where 
they are producing a truly general 
purpose fowl from the show room 
stock and the utility stock that is 
firing the hearts and ambitions of 
all who have been trying to produce 
a hen characteristic of the demands 
of the modern farmer. 

The farmer has always had a tend- 
ency to hold the show room hen in 
disdain and to doubt whether such a 
hen could ever be brought to a high 
egg production. There has grown up 
a popular belief that the show room 
hen is a delicate fowl requiring 
special treatment to make her a suc- 
cess, something so great that no 
farmer can afford to "monkey" with 
her. 

D. W. Young, the famous White 
Leghorn breeder, who is now retired, 
first proved that this idea is all 
wrong, when he produced hens that 
won the highest prizes at the best 
shows in the world and which had 
trap-nest records in excess of two 
hundred eggs per hen. 

The Rhode Island Red breeders 
have lately demonstrated the same 
thing, while a prominent White Rock 
breeder has a number of blue-ribbon 
winners which have enviable egg rec- 
ords to their credit. 

Mr. Young, particularly, has by his 
experience proved that as soon as 
the breed characteristics have been 
firmly implanted in the strain, ac- 
cording to the Standard of Perfec- 
tion, that egg laying ability is more 
apt to be in the well-bred hen than 
in the hen of haphazard breeding. It 
is exactly the same reasoning which 
tells you that the purebred hen is 
better than the mongrel hen. 

The hen of tomorrow is not going 
to be an egg-producer alone or a 
fancy fowl. She is going to be a 
hen that is as true to the standard 
as possible and still be a heavy lay- 
er. The poultry breeders of today 
are following that theory and they 
are breeding to the standard as well 
as for eggs. — C. S. 



FOR THOSE WHO CAN USE HAM- 
MER AXD SAW 



Built and Used by Poultrynien 



Is a 9 6-page book; paper bound; 
contains 108 illustrations, fully de- 
scribing various styles of poultry 
houses for the large farm, as well as 
the back yard. Poultry house equip- 
ment, including roosts; trap-nests, 
food boxes and hoppers; drinking 
founts; fences, both permanent and 
movable; metal fence posts; brood- 
ers both firefess and heated; brood- 
coops; covered chick yards; poultry 
catchers, the popular stove-pipe hop- 
per, and many other useful appli- 
ances that can be made at home and 
money saved. For the man who en- 
joys making his own poultry appli- 
ances, building his own coops, 
houses, etc., this book is of especial 
value. Labor-saving and money- 
saving devices are fully explained 
and illustrated so that the man who 
can use a hammer and saw can make 
any of them. Price 50 cents. Ad- 
dress Poultry Keeper, Quincy. 111. 



1 /^DouJ^ii nj^ovjL (PtojlttJ 




1st PRIZE 
Chicago, Jan.1922 



Thousands of 
8 week Pullets 
Now Ready 

One of the best 

ways to start with 
Ferris Leghorns is to 
buy a pen of 8-week- 
old pullets. At this 
age the pullets weigh 
about % lb. and the 
cockerels about one 
pound. The trouble 
and lossthatsometimes 
occur in raising chicks 
is avoided, for these 
pullets are ready for the 
roosts; and are practi- 
cally out of danger. We 
guarantee safe arri- 
val anywhere. 

SEND FOR 

FREE CATALOG 

Send today for 

your copy of our 1922 
catalog and _ Mating 
List, of Special May 
cut prices. Absolutely 
free for the asking. 
Contains a world of 
information on White 
Leghorns — English or 
American type. Get 
this Free Catalog and 
increase your profits. 
Simply send your 
name and address. 



EGG - RECORD 

WHITE LEGHORNS 

We mean exactly what we say. You can 
double your profits with the famous Ferris egg-record 
White Leghorns — Winter laying hens bred direct from 
the famous contest winners of America. Order now or 
send for Free catalog. 

Egg and Chick Bargains 



200-230 


230-264 


265-300 


Strain 


Strain 


Strain 


$2.50 


$ 3.50 


$ 7.00 


6.00 


10.00 


18.50 


11.00 


17.50 


35.00 


26.00 


40.00 


80.00 


48.00 


75.00 


145.00 


95.00 


135.00 


275.00 


200-230 


230-264 


265-300 


Strain 


Strain 


Strain 


S 7.00 


$10.00 


$18.50 


12.00 


18.50 


35.00 


22.00 


35.00 


65.00 


55.00 


80.00 


145.00 


110.00 


i45.00 


275.00 


200.00 


275.00 





FILL OUT THIS ORDER BLANK NOW 



You can order direct from this 

advertisement if you wish. Set your 
own shipping date. We'll ;end your 
order exactly when you want it — any 
time in May or June. Send only 10% 
cash with your order. We will ship 
C.O.D. for the balance. Every 



shipment sent prepaid on ap- 
proval and fully guaran- 
teed. Order now or send 
name and address for jzr 
big FREE Catalog. 



GEO. B. 
FERRIS 

9094 Union 

Ave., 
Grand Rapids 
Michigan 





GEO. B. FERRIS, 
90S4 Union Ave. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

or about 



teed_ 



send me prepaid and guaran- 
chicks 

eggs from 



egg strain. I enclose. 



10% payment 
rfull payment. 



Name. 



I Address. 



EASY WAY TO GET EGGS 

"OCULLM", the GREAT EGG MAKER, makes LAYERS shell out and NON LAYERS fat. 
It adds 1 to 3 lbs. to them. 

FEED ONLY ONE DROP A DAY PER HEN IN THE PEED. 

H. C. Miller, Akron, 0., Judge A. P. Assn., says "OCTJLUM" made 48 jump from 8 
to 42 eggs per day. 

"OCTJLUM" RELIEVES DISEASE. 

It takes the place of all tonics and remedies. "OCTJLUM" is a wonderful remedy and 
highly recommended. "Baltimore Sun". 

Journals, Ex. Stations and Fanciers praise it. This Journal O. It's us. Bradley Bros., 
Lee, Mass., of world wide fame say "OCULTJM" HAS no equal", they have ustd it 10 years. 

BOOKLET FREE Sample 10c Bottles by mail 50c and $1. Guaranteed. 

Dealers Handle. Agents Wanted. 

THE "OCTJLUM" CO., Box S, Salem, Va. 



BABY CHICKS WITH THE STAMP OF QUALITY 

Yes, and They Are Hoganized, Too! 

We hatch the following: Rocks, Reds, Leghorns, Anconas, Andahisians, 
Orpingtons, Wyandottes, Langshans, Cornish, Hamburgs. 
Our 4 0 page catalogue free. 

Brooders, Poultry supplies. We can save you money. 

The S)iili Keaton Poultry Farm, Box 11?, Kenton, Ohio 

CHAS. W. WYLEE, Snpt. GEO. W. COX. Prop. 



BALLARD'S SUPREME WHITE ROCKS 



Have mated some fine pens for the eg 
P. W. BALLARD, 



trade from my Champion winners. Mating list on request. 

GALESBURG, ILL. 



Page Number 2 6 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



JITHS NEW LAND 

Strawberry Plants 
ForBig Crops &Big Profits 

$500 to $700 per acre growing strawberries from Keith's big, healthy, 
new land plants is not an uncommon yield. Some yield much better. 
This is proof positive that strawberries are a paying crop. Especially 
is it so when you plant Keith's vigorous, heavily rooted plants for the 
home garden or commercial purposes. They are grown on rich, new, 
sandy loam, an ideal soil for plant production, making them big profit 
winners. Every plant sure to grow. 
Our MoneV Back You don't take chances in setting Keith's plants. 

. „ . £ TrrrE0-$8.50, 100-$12.00. Mrs. Henry Newcomer, Mt. 
Morris, 111. 

DUCK EGGS — Fawn and White Indian Runners, 
12-$1.25. Mrs. E. F. Sands, Malta, Ohio. 



BIG TYPE, HIGH QUALITY MAMMOTH 

Toulouse Geese, eggs $3.50 setting of seven. 
A,. M. Stouffer, Waddams Grave, 111. 

LARGE TOULOUSE GEESE— Eggs 40 cents each 
prepaid. John Cerny, Cobden, 111. 

BUFF ORPINGTON DUCKS— Eggs $1.75 per 
dozen. Postpaid 5th zone. John Eyer, Fort 
Jennings, Ohio. 3-3 



EGGS— Mammoth Pekin 50-$5.00, 100-$8.00. 
White Holland also Bourbon Red Turkeys 10- 
$8.00. Mrs. Frank Spurling, Forest Park, 111. 

3-4 



DUCKS — Rouens, Pekins, Runners, Muscovy, 
Wild Mallards. Geese: Toulouse, African, China, 
Emden. John Hass, Bettendorf, Iowa. 2-3 



BUFF ORPINGTON DUCK EGGS— $2-15, post- 
paid, insured, In three zones. Rauch's Poultry 
Yard, Jenera, Ohio. 2-4 



HORTON'S HIGH QUALITY FAWN AND 

White Indian Runner duck eggs for hatching. 
Sylvan View Poultry Farm, Curryville, Mo. 2-5 



SILKIES 



WHITE SILKIE EGGS — $2.. 00 per 13. Cockerels. 
Arthur Worthington, R. 3, Two Rivers, Wis. 

3-3 



FAV0R0LLES 



WHITE FAVEROLLES— Foremost utility fowls. 
Greatest winter layers. Develop quickly. Eggs 
and chicks from prize winners. Pixley, R. 2, 
Wayne, Mich. 3-4 



GUINEAS 



ONE FIFTY FIFTEEN WHITE GUINEA EGGS, 

postpaid. L. Leavitt, Sniithfield, 111. 



HOUDANS 



DARK HOUDAN STOCK FOR SALE— Range 
eggs $5.00 per hundred. M. Stephenson, Welton. 
Iowa. 4-2 

HAMBURGS 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS— Setting eggs 
$3 per 15. Mrs. Otto Hanne, St. Joseph, Mo., 
Route 3. 3-2 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS BABY 

Chicks. High quality. Reasonable prices. 
Catalogue Free. South Kenton Poultry Farm, 
Kenton, Ohio. 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURG COCKERELS 

and eggs. Frank Heilman, Knox, Ind. 3-3 

WHITE LANGSHANS 

WHITE LANGSHAN BABY CHICKS— High 
quality. Reasonable prices. Catalogue Free. 
Soutli Kenton Poultry Farm, Kenton, Ohio. 

WHITE LANGSHAN EGGS FOR HATCHING— 

Prize stock, 46 pullets layed 927 eggs in Dec. 
Pen 1, $2.00 per 15; Pen 2, $1.00. Baby chicks. 
Mrs. H. S. Brown, Salem, Iowa. 3-3 

BLACK LANGSHANS 

BLACK LANGSHAN BABY CHICKS— High 
quality. Reasonable prices. Catalogue free. 
South Kenton Poultry Farm, Kenton, Ohio. 

BIG BLACK LANGSHANS— Setting $2.50, 100- 
$10.00. 100 Chix $25.00. Ella Whitwood, Hud- 
son, HI. 

SPLENDID BLACK LANGSHANS — Eggs from 
high scoring pen reduced to $2.00 for 15, and 
$10 per 100. Utility pen $1.00 per 15, $5.00 
per 100. Viola Smith, Salem, Iowa. 

LARGE, "HOGAN TESTED" BLACK LANG- 

shans, eggs $7.00-100. Chicks 20c each. Chas. 
Knight, Lerna, Illinois. 2-3 



| BREEDER'S CARDS | 

o — o 

LEGHORNS 

300 SINGLE COMB WHITE AND BROWN LEG- 

horns, 1 year hens, cockerels, pullets. Hatching 
eggs. A. Schroeder, St. Peter, 111. 12-12 

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 19— Rich Brothers, R. 
F. D. No. 2, Box 70, Elkhart, Ind. 

THE LEGHORN WORLD only journal in World 
devoted exclusively to Leghorns. Tells how to 
make big money with them — how to buy, sell, 
get greatest pleasure, most profit — everything 
you want to know about Leghorns. Published 
monthly, 50c year — 3 years $1.00. "Everything 
About S. C. White Leghorns", remarkable book 
tells how to mate, judge, feed, cull, prepare 
for show, sell, advertise, etc. Given free with 
3 year subscription at $1.00. Send dollar bill 
today. The Leghorn World, Box 6314, Waver- 
ly, Iowa. 

WHITE LEGHORNS 



PULLETS. BABY CHICKS— If you want Leg- 
horns of Superior Quality, Kuhn has them at 
let live prices. Be wise and write Kuhn be- 
fore you buy. H. M. Kuhn, Sycamore, Ohio. 4-3 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORN EGGS FOR HATCH- 

ing, $2.00 per 15. Pen 1, $5.00 per 50. Mrs. 
Ellen E. Omans, Frazee, Minn. 

HUNDRED WINNERS, SINGLE COMB WHITE 

Leghorns. Young's (282 egg.) -Fifteen eggs 
$2.50, fifty, $6.00, hundred $10.50. Fifty chicks 
$12, hundred $19. Pen headed by winner Silver 
Cup best male state show. 15 eggs $5, fifty 
$12. Fifty chicks $19. Meadow Farm, Coulter - 
ville, 111. 

S. C. W. LEGHORNS— Ferris strain, heavy 
layers. Eggs 15-$1, 100-$5. Mrs. John Pearcy, 
Martinsville, Indiana. 4-2 

PURE SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORNS — 

Eggs $3.00-30, $7.75-100. Chix $4.50-2-5, $8.00- 
50, $15.00-100. Extra good quality, satisfac- 
tion guaranteed. Chas Quiram, Waterville, 
Minn. 

S. C. W. LEGHORN EGGS — Winter layers, 
$2.00 per 15 prepaid. Mrs. L. Malmborg, R. 1, 
Ishpeming, Mich. 4-2 

FERRIS SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORN 

hatching eggs 15 eggs $1.00, 30-$1.75, 50-$2.50, 
100-$4.50, prepaid. Also Registered : Holstein 
cattle, either sex. Leo Kulii & Son, Hazel 
Green, Wisconsin. 4-2 



LARGE PUREBRED S. C, WHITE LEG- 

horns. Farm range, Hoganized, heavy winter 
layers. Eggs $1.25 per 15, $6.00 per 100. 
Chicks 15c each. Mrs. G. B. Cultice, Union 
City, Indiana, R. 7. 



BARRON SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORNS, 

15 eggs 75 cents, 100-$4.75. 20 years breeder. 
Geo. E. Adams, Green Bay, Wis., R. 7. 4-2 



CL0VERDALE LEGHORN FARM AND HATCH- 

ery. Breeders of S. C. White Leghorns. Youngs 
foundation stock. Eggs and baby clucks. Cir- 
culars free. Aurora, Mo. 3-3 



SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORN EGGS FOR 

Hatching from 290 egg strain at $1.35 per 15, 
$5.50 per 100. Parcel Post prepaid. Safe ar- 
rival guaranteed. Our flock was culled by the 
County Agent especially for egg production. 
Henry Kerstiens, Ferdinand, Ind., R. 2. 3-2 



KOEPSELL'S 230-300 EGG-BRED SINGLE 

Comb White Leghorns. Chicks and eggs at 
prepaid prices. Catalog Free. Koepsell Leghorn 
Farm, Sta. E., Mayville, Wise. 



ENGLISH— Yesterlaid Strain White Leghorns. 
Eggs, 100-$5.00. Henry New, Streator, 111. 3-2 

WHITE LEGHORN EGGS — Thornburg's, Ferris 
world's greatest layers. Eggs, 15-$1.50, 100- 
$6.00, delivered. Valley Egg and Dairy Farm, 
Campbell, Mo., R. 4. 3-3 

EGGS AND CHICKS FROM THE BIG KIND 

English White Leghorns. Selected matings. All 
high record stock. No more stock for sale. 
Chas. W. Johnson, Linton, Ind. 3-2 

1000 TRAPNESTED WHITE LEGHORNS — 

Pedigreed stock, eggs and chicks. Circular T 
free. C. T. Patterson, R. 4, Springfield, Mo^ 



THE T. F. LANGABEER S. C. WHITE LEG- 

horn plant offers eggs from 12 pens of trap 
nested stock. (Eleven years use of trap nests.) 
3 best pens, 15 et* i £*t Postpaid 

The small holes in the top pan prevent the chicks from getting into the feed or water— prevent them from crowding 
too clo=e around the feeder and prevent dirt and droppings from polluting the contents. There is absolutely nothing 
in the construction of these pans to become loose or broken— they overcome every objection to the ordinary Mason Jar 

pan and are the most desirable of all feeding and watering devices. Order them today. Sold and guaranteed by 

AMERICAN POULTRY JOURNAL, 137 PETERSON BUILDING, CHICAGO. ILL. 
World's Oldest, Lareest and Best Poultry Paper, 1 year 15c: 2 yrs. $1.00: 5 yrs. $ - i.O(> 
or $1.00 Buy-. 15 Pans and American Poultry Journal Four Moutlis. 




STOP 
WHITE 
DIARRHEA 

BY KILLING THE CAUSE 

GALLI-CURA 

f 

produces satisfactory results in either pre- 

Ivention or treatment or TOUR MONET 
■WILL BE REFUNDED. 51.00 per package 
. — postpaid. Sufficient for 12% gallons of 
material. Simple yet effective. Used by 
*, the largest hatcheries. Supplied by the pro- 
ducers of A. S. L. Avian Mixed Bacterin. 
Let us tell you what vaccination will do in 
the prevention and treatment of Eoup, Cank- 
er, Colds, Catarrh, Diphtheria, Fowl Cholera 
etc. Ask for FREE Booklet on Vaccination 
and the Prevention of Fowl Diseases. 

American Scientific Laboratories, Inc. 

157 West Kinzie St., Dept. D-23 Chicago. Illinois 

Will Pay for Itself 

The extra chicks 
you will hatch 
and raise with 
Oliver Incubators 
and B r o o d e rs 
will soon pay for 
the entire equip- 
ment. Oliver In- 
cubators are sold 
on a money back 
guarantee. Let us tell you all about 
them before you buy an Incubator. 

OLIVER IXCUBATOR CO., 
Paris. Illinois 




KILLS MITES IN HEN-HOUSES 




5*5^^. ARROW ^ , ... 
W» Applied 

"~ u /V ONCE A 
OARBOLINBUM SmSEE 

Guaranteed and highly recom- 
mended. Write for Circulars 

Carbolineum Wood PreservingCo. 
Dept. 154 Milwaukee, Wis. 



GOOD SERVICE 

Mr. H. L. Adair, Clayton. 111., is 
advertising eggs for- hatching from 
his splendid strain of White Rocks. 
He just submitted a couple of let- 
ters from his customers which we 
Quote only in part. 

George Bomfay, Pensacola, Fla., 
writes: Dear Mr. Adair: "Birds 
received this morning and will say 
that I was more than satisfied. They 
had a long trip but came through in 
fine shape." 

Messrs. Joe Tremmel & Sons, High- 
land, 111., writes: Dear Mr. Adair: 
"Just came from the station. Re- 
ceived birds in fine condition and I 
am well pleased with them. They 
are much better than I expected." 

Mr. Adair prides himself upon his 
excellent service that he gives with 
his birds. He wants every customer 
satisfied. The same is true of his 
eggs for hatching. He gives personal 
attention to every order and his stock 
is of such a quality that customers 
seem invariably to be well pleased. 



MAKE UP A CLUB 

Make up a club of your own, choosing the 
papers or magazines you want to take. Write 
and let me quote a special cut price. I can 
save you considerable money on your subscrip- 
tions." A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, Dllnois. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 29 



THE BEST « 

AND 
SURE WAY 



ij 

Protect your fowls from the powerful and insidious 
lice and mites that suck the life-blood of your birds. 

These parasites allowed to run 
rampant in a hen house will suck 
more blood, more vitality over night 
than fowls can replace by the assimi- 
lation of large quantities of food dur- 
ing the day— think this over. 

Extra care must be taken that not 
only the birds are kept clean, but 
every crack and crevice as well. 





K/7/s Lice 



No dusting — No dipping — No painting 
— Just hang up the bottle 

— and in a few days your entire flock and hen house will be rid or 
every louse and mite. Licecil leaves the bottle in powerful 
evaporating vapors which descend in a misty form, penetrating 
feathers, cracks, and crevices everywhere. Lice and mites have 
no lungs. They breathe through the pores of the body. The 
vapors from Licecil will quickly kill them. They cannot stand 
the odor of Licecil, and its presence in your hen house will rid 
you of these pests. 

How to Use Licecil 

Simply put a few drops in the nest and on the roosts, hang the 
uncovered bottle in coop or hen house. The powerful evapora- 
ing vapors which leave the bottle descending in mist form 
penetrate cracks, crevices, everywhere. Lice, mites, chiggers, 
roaches, bed bugs, ants, etc., will be destroyed by Licecil vapors. 
Will not injure chicks. 

GIVE IT A FAIR TRIAL 

If you prefer to fight poultry pests in the old way — it is certainly 
your privilege to do so. But your own best interest, and the suc- 
cess others are having, will lead you to give Licecil a fair, honest 
trial at the earliest opportunity. 

1 Bottle, $1.00; 3 Bottles, $2.50; 12 Bottles, $9.00— All Postpaid. 

American Supply Company, Dept. P K Quincy, Illinois 




Chicken Mites Filled 
With the Life Blood 
of Faithful Hens. 




Evidence! 

KEEPS ON USING LICECIL. 

Please find chacks for $5 for which 
send me six bottles of Licecil. I 
have been using Licecil and find it 
O. K. This is the third order, which 
speaks for itself. 

J. D. ALLEN, Lynchburg, Va.. 

WANTS MORE. 
I am sending for some more 
Licecil. It is the best preparation 
to rid the place of lice I have ever 
found. Send as quick as possible, 
because I am all out now. 
JOHN HOLTRAP, Lynden, Wash. 

KEEPS ON USING IT. 
Pind enclosed money order for 
Licecil. I was well pleased with 
results from the other bottle I 
bought. Have over 200 birds and 
when I use Licecil lice are a very 
scarce article with me. 

J. E. PLATT, Maywood, 111. 

LITTLE WORRY OR WORK. 

Please send me three bottles of 
Licecil. Like it very much. With 
Licecil there is little worry or v/ork. 
Enclosed find money order for $2.50 
for the three bottles. 

BERNARD F. OSTERFIELD. 

Dayton, Ohio. 

SEND MORE. 

Please send me three bottles of 
Licecil. I received the one bottle 
ordered recently, and have had splen- 
did results. There is one thing sure, 
no lice or mites will stay on the 
chickens with the odor of Licecil 
about. L. G. STAYNOS. 

Sherman, Texas. 



. AMERICAN SUPPLY COMPANY 

Department P KQUINCY, ILLINOIS 

Gentlemen: Enclosed please find $ for which send me 



bottles of Licecil as soon as possible. 



Name 



THE END 



Street 



Town 



Page Number 30 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



BREEDER'S CARDS. 



WHITE LEGHORNS 

S. C. W. LEGHORN EGGS— from good laying 
stock. Farm range. Maude Davis, Sabula, la. 

3-3 

BARRON- YOUNG SINGLE COMB WHITE LEG- 

horas. Eggs $4 a hundred. A. Behl, Palmer, 
111. 2-2 

SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORN EGGS FOR 

hatching. Flock 1— $2.00 per 15; $10.00 per 
100. Flock 2—11.25 per 15; $5.00 per 100. J. 
R. Frew, Eustis, Nebr. 

WHITE LEGHORN BABY CHICKS — American 
or English from selected heavy producers. Cir- 
cular. Frank Heinz, Box 12, Comstock Park, 
Mich. 

FERRIS WHITE LEGHORNS— direct. Eggs, 
Special Matings (205-300 Males mated 200-265 
Females) §3.00 per 15 prepaid. Other matings 
$2.00; $1.50. Sunnyside Yards, Bos 591-K, 
Saranac Lake, N. Y. 1-4 

BROWN LEGHORNS 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS — Light and dark- 
great layers. Surplus stock and eggs very 
reasonable. Henry Tushaus, 1000 Vine St., 
Quincy, 111. 2-4 

SINGLE COMB BROWN LEGHORN EGGS — 

Heavy layers. $1.50 per 15; $7.00 per 100. 
Blanche Dorsey, Dresden, O. 2-3 

W. W. KULP, BOX 30, POTTSTOWN, PA. — 

The leaders in size and contest winners. Cata- 
log. Both combs. 

S. C. DARK BROWN LEGHORNS— Eggs for 
hatching from pen one, $2.50 per 15. Pen 2 
$1.75 per 15. No reduction for larger quan- 
tities. Willis Fairbanks. Mora, Minn. 4-12 

BLACK LEGHORNS 

DIMOND BLACK LEGHORNS— My 28 hens 
laid 74 eggs in 3 days. Eggs $2.00 per 15, 
$5.00 per 50. H. C. Hunt, Delavan, HI. 



100 BLACK LEGHORN CHIX $20.00; 600, 

$95.00. Ella Whitwood, Hudson, Hi. 

BLACK LEGHORN BABY CHICKS — High qual- 
ity. Reasonable prices. Catalogue Free. South 
Kenton Poultry Farm, Kenton, Ohio. 

BUFF LEGHORNS 

SINGLE COMB BUFF LEGHORNS— Solid buff. 
Heavy lavers. Eggs from special pens $1.25 
per 15, $6.00 per 100. Arthur Wortliington, 
Two Rivers, Wis. 

SPECIALLY BRED MANY GENERATIONS — 

for stamina, large yield of big eggs, and beauty. 
I have the goods. Both combs. Eggs, hens and 
pens reasonable. Catalog. Joseph Benedict, 
Chevy Chase, Maryland. 

SINGLE COMB BUFF LEGHORNS— Hoganized, 
testing 140 to 280 eggs. Stock, Eggs, Chicks. 
Theo Jeschke, R. 1. K, Troy Kansas. 



ROSE COMB BUFF LEGHORNS— Madison 
Square winners. Charles Schroth, Cabot, Pa. 

2-3 



MINORCAS 



BLACK MINORCAS. BUFF ORPINGTONS. 

Eggs. Ten varieties baby chicks. Frank A. 
Agnew, Southside, Omaha, Nebr. 3-4 



VIGOROUS S. C. BLACK MINORCAS— Wonder- 
full egg producers. Eggs $1.50 per 15. John 
Rodtke, 717 LaCrosse Street, La Crosse, Wis- 
consin. 

MAMMOTH S. C. BLACK MIN0RCAS--S1 per 

15 eggs. Zula Edwards, Van Wert, Ohio. 4-2 

GIANT SINGLE COMB BLACK MINORCAS— 

Setting $3.00; 100-$12.00. Ella Whitwood, Hud- 
son, 111. 

ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCA EGGS— Winter 
layers, prize winners. Jay Folfer Beswick, 
Berea, Ohio. 3-3 

HATCHING EGGS — Pape's direct, fine layers, 
prize winners. Selected matings $3.00 per 15. 
Guy Threlkeld, Golconda, HI. 3-2 

ROSE COMB WHITE MINORCAS— 30 eggs, pre- 
paid, $4. H. L. Carson, Middleport, Ohio. 3-5 

SINGLE COMB WHITE MINORCA EGGS— 

Standard bred. Mrs. Walter Raypole, Churu- 
busco, Ind. 



BREEDER'S CARDS 



BLUE ORPINGTONS 



LOOK — Royal Blue Orpingtons. Winners. John 
Dnangst, 1214 Prairie Ave., Freeport, 111. 3-12 



WHITE ORPINGTONS 



WHITE ORPINGTON EGGS AND STOCK FOR 

Sale — Real bargains — from great layers and 
prize winners. Utility breeding or exhibition 
quality — fourteen of my birds under the rib- 
bons at Chicago National Poultry Show Jan- 
uary, 1922. Don't place your order until you 
get my illustrated catalog and mating list. 
Save money — get better quality. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. Write today. Edgar F. Alden, 
Linden and Willow Road, Dept P. K. 5, Win- 
netka, Hlinois. 



WHITE ORPINGTONS — Cook-Morris strains. 
My trapnested winter layers are money makers. 
Eggs $2 per 15, $5 per 50, postpaid. E. H. 
Wisen, Malcolm, Nebr. 



S. C. WHITE ORPINGTON EGGS— Heavy lay- 
ers, $1.50 per 15; $7.00 per 100. Elva CantweU, 
Bucklin, Mo. 3-4 



ONE PEN PRIZE-WINNING, PURE-BRED S. 

C. White Orpingtons. Big type, very white, 
great layers. Eggs for hatching $3.00 for 15. 
Harry P. Long, Thornville, Ohio. 3-2 



FINE SINGLE COMB WHITE ORPINGTON 

eggs for hatching at $2.00 a setting. Ed Dierk- 
ing, Bixley, Minn., R. No. 5, Box 28. 3-2 



BUFF ORPINGTONS 



BUFF ORPINGTONS— Byer's direct. Winter 
layers, prize winners. Eggs from select mat- 
ings $3.00 per 15. Guy Threlkeld, Golconda, HI. 

3-2 

BUFF ORPINGTON EGGS FOR SALE — $1.50 
per 15. Walter E. Vogel, Strasburg, HI., 3-2 

BUFF ORPINGTONS— Eggs from our prize win- 
ners l$-$5.00, from other pens $2.50. These are 
excellent layers. Adolph Campbell, Princeton, 
Tnd., Route 2. 3-2 

BUFF ORPINGTON EGGS— From heavy winter 
laying strain. Pen headed with cockerel direct 
from Wm. Cook & Sons Yard. $2.00 and $3.00 
per 15, parcel post prepaid. Phil G. Wurtz, 
704 Ohio, Quincy, HI. 2-3 

BUFF ORPINGTON HATCHING EGGS from my 
Quincy and Adams County Fair winners. Ex- 
hibition matings $3.00, $3.50, and $5.00 per 15 
eggs. Satisfaction guaranteed. Utility, $1.50 
per 15; $9.00 per 100. Order from this ad or 
write for mating list. Also a few good breed- 
ing cockerels. Walter Goessling, 930 Jefferson 
St., Quincy, HI. 1-4 

PHEASANTS 

RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS— $5 for 15, post 
paid. Charles Knecht, 1715 N. 13th St., Kansas 
City, Kans. 3-4 

PIGEONS 

I OFFER— mated Homers. $2.00 pair. Beautl- 
White Homers, $3.00 pair. Get my prices 
on Runts, Carneaux, Maltese Hens. Free book- 
let, Sqnab Mannual 50c. Charles B. Gilbert, 
2210 Almond St., Philadelphia, Pa. 10-6 

RABBITS 

THREE DOLLARS PAIR — Four months Bel- 
gian Hares. Luther Leavitt, Smithfield, El. 

RAISING RABBITS — Is profitable for meat, 
fur and breeding. Succeed booklet 10c. Breed- 
ers for sale $1.50. Maikranz Babbitry, New r 
Bethlehem, Pa. 

RHODE ISLAND REDS 

ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND RED EGGS- 
SI. 00 per 15, $6.00 per 100. Bred to lay. Mrs. 
Joe Walz, Glen Haven, Wis. 4-3 

REDS THAT LAY! The strain that pays. 
Rose Comb. Eggs. Circular. Albert Bern- 
hardt, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. 

SINGLE ALSO ROSE COMB REDS — Setting 
$1.50, 100-$7.00. 100 chix $20.00. Ella Whit- 
wood, Hudson, m. 

SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS— Baby 
Chicks, from choice matings. Splendid winter 
layers, large fine type and color. Mrs. L. J. 
Stahl, Washington, El. 3-2 

ROSE COMB REDS— Blue ribbon winners nii- 
nois State Fair, Adams County Fair, Quincy 
Poultry Show. Eggs $2 and $3 per 15, parcel 
post paid. W. H. Rueter, 1023 Washington St., 
Quincy, 111. 3-2 



BREEDER'S CARDS | 
. o 

RHODE ISLAND REDS 



LISTEN — Rose Comb Reds. Choice matings. 
Eggs and stock. V. E. Ray, Albion, Indiana. 

3-2 

ROSE COMB REDS— Bean strain. Exhibition 
quality. Trapnested ten years, yearly records 
to 306 eggs. Three pens, eggs 25, 20, 15 cents 
each. Jos. Forge, Burlington, Wise. 

ROSE COMB RED EGGS — From prize winners 
and record layers. (Bean strain.) Mating list. 
Daugherty's Poultry Farm, Metcalf, HI. 3-2 

ROSE COMB REDS— Large dark stock, excel- 
lent layers, eggs $2.50-30, $6-100. Geo. Fisher, 
Coatsburg, Dl. 2-3 

ROSE COMB R. I. REDS— Eggs for hatching. 
Carver and Bean strain. Eggs $4.00 per 15, 
3 pens mated. John W. Searigct, Granger, 
Mo. 2-3 

RHODE ISLAND RED JOURNAL only Journal 
in World devoted exclusively to Rhode Island 
Reds. Tells how to make big money with them 
— how to buy, sell, get greatest pleasure, most 
profit — everything you want to know about 
Rhode Island Reds. Published monthly 50c 
year — 3 years $1.00. "Blue Ribbon Beds", re- 
markable book tells how to judge, mate, cull, 
feed, prepare for show, linebreed, etc. Given 
free with 3-year subscription at $1.00. Send 
dollar bill today. Rhode Island Red Journal, 
Box 5314, Waverly, Iowa. 

RHODE ISLAND WHITES 

HATCHING EGGS FROM PURE ROSE COMB 

Rhode Island Whites, laying and show birds, 
bred from G-enoway & Alphonso strains, write 
for prices. J. J. Halter, Perryville, Mo. 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND WHITES AND REDS 

from Madison Square and St. Louis winners, 
mating list. Runell's Poultry Farm, Findlay, 
O. 



CHOICE HEAVY-LAYING RHODE ISLAND 

White Pullets, $2.00. Baby chicks, 25-$7.00. 
Eggs, 15-$1.50; 100-$8.00. Large Toulouse goose 
eggs 35c. Mrs. Elza Jones, Route 5, Memphis, 
Missouri. 3-2 



PARTRIDGE ROCKS 



EGG RECORD PARTRIDGE ROCKS— National 
and Coliseum winners. Eggs, chicks, stock. 
Riley Smith, Albion, Ind. 3-3 



PARTRIDGE ROCKS — Selected trapnested 
hatching eggs from heavy producers. Pen 
headed by son of prize cockerel Madison Square 
Garden. Fifteen for $5. Glen Toalson, Osceola, 
Missouri. 2-3 



WHITE ROCKS 



SNYDER'S WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS— Eggs 
$2.00 a setting from No. 1 Pens. Dellwood 
Poultry Yards, A. S. Snyder, Dellwood, N. Y. 

4-3 



LARGE PURE BRED WHITE ROCKS— Hatch- 
ing eggs from prize winners and splendid laying 
strain. Fishel direct at $2.00 per 15. A satis- 
factory hatch guaranteed. H. L. Adair, Clay- 
ton, HI. 

EGGS — Prize Winning White Rocks. Thomason 
and Poorman's 200 egg strain. First pen $5.00, 
second $3.50, farm range $1.50. None finer. 
Mrs. G. G. Carman, R. 1, Sedalia, Kentucky, 
Oak Dale Poultry Farm. 

BARRED ROCKS 

TESTED BARRED ROCK EGGS — From Park's 
strain $3.00 per 15: $5.50 per 30. Eg-gs from 
utility stock $7.00 per hindred. Mrs. A. Rev- 
ell, Central City, Iowa. 

BARRED ROCK EGGS— SI. 00-15. $6.00-100. 
Nicely barred, size, shape, rigor, good layers. 
Eugene Wood, Mt. Carroll, HI. 

PARK'S STRAIN BARRED ROCK CHICKS 

and Selected eggs. Priced right. Eva Bojar, 
Saint Bernard, Ohio. 3-3 

BARRED ROCKS — Hatching eggs, sixty cents 
per setting. Mrs. E. E. Mark. Stronghurst, 
Hlinois. 3-3 

EXHIBITION BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS — 

Dark mating. Eggs and stock for sale, from 
one of the largest breeders in the middle west. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Ed Haddenhorst, 319 
N. 11th, Qnincy. HI. 

"CACKLERS" ARE PUREBRED BRED-TO-LAY 

Barred Rocks. Trapnested by Geo. W. Pratt, 
Crnpsev. 111. 18 eggs S2.50: 36-$4.50. 72-S8.00. 
ino-sio.00, prepaid. Circular free. Stock all 
sold. 2-12 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 31 



BREEDER'S CARDS 



BARBED BOCKS 



BARRED BOCK EGGS — Range $6.00-100, Pen 
Holteniian $4.00-13. Floyd Friedow, Kanawha, 
Iowa. 4-2 

BRADLEY STRAIN— Eggs $1.50-$10.00. S. H. 
Phelps, Monmouth, 111. 2-4 

MY VICT0BY STRAIN OF BARRED ROCKS — 

Won at Toledo, O., Nov. 29th to Dec. 4th, 1921. 
3, 4, 5, Ex Cock; 2 Ex Cockerel; 1, 2, Ex Hen; 
3 Ex Pullet; 1, 2, Pullet Bred Cock; 2 Cock- 
erel Bred Pen; Silver Medal for Best Display. 
Barred Rock Club Shape and Color Specials. 
Illustrated circular Free. J. T. French, 838 
West Grove Place, Toledo, Ohio. 

PARKS ROCKS— Eggs that will hatch. Cata- 
log. W. W. Kulp, Box 30, Pottstown, Pa. 

BARRED ROCK HATCHING EGGS — $1.50, 15; 
$7.00, 100. Cockerels, $3.00, $5.00. Brookside 
Farm, St. Peter, 111. 1-4 

SUSSEX 

SPECKLED SUSSEX EGGS — 15-$2; 45-$5; 100- 
$10. Maple Dell Poultry Farm, Sugar Creek, O. 

SEVERAL VARIETIES 

LOOK! LOOK! — Eggs $1.00 per 15, $5.50 hun- 
dred. 25 breeds greatest special price list free. 
Fleming Bros., Shelbyvllle, Illinois. 4-2 

HAMBURG AND DARK CORNISH HATCHING 

eggs from purebred stock. Carl Kullberg, Ells- 
worth, Iowa. 

PURE BRED SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURG 

and Single Comb Brown Leghorn cockerels, 
$1,50 each. Single Comb Brown Leghorn eggs 
$1.50 per 15. Magnus Mathison, Princeton, 
Minnesota. 

EGGS FOR HATCHING — Black Javas and Red- 
Caps $J3 per 15. William Halin, Spades, Bid. 

BUFF ORPINGTON AND ANC0NA EGGS 

from exhibition stock. Exceedingly heavy egg 
laying strains. Roup and Son, Ames, Iowa. 4-2 

SINGLE COMB ANCONAS AND BUFF 0R- 

pintons. Eggs $1.50' per 15. Mrs. Jake Tuma, 
Lesneur Center, Minnesota, B. No. 3. 

EGGS — Single Comb Buff and Brown Leghorns, 
White Guineas and other varieties, 15 eggs 
$2.00: Viola Woods, Albion, Illinois. 4-2 

SINGLE COMB REDS $1.50 SETTING— Exhibi- 
tion S. C. White Leghorns $1.50 setting. Wild 
Mallards $3 setting. English Callers $5 set- 
ting. Prepaid. O. Robey, Maryville, Mo. 3-4 

WHITE ROCK COCKERELS $3— Eggs from 
special pen. Pekin ducks. Embden geese, Hol- 
land Turkeys. Circular. Mrs. Frank Spitler, 
Kentland, Ind. 3-2 

HARRY SWINBURNE, DELHI, IOWA OF- 

fers 137 varieties poultry, pheasants, ducks, 
geese, eggs. 3-4 

FOR SALE — Houdan eggs $3.00 per 15. Bearded 
Golden Polish $4.00 per 15 eggs. Mrs. Theo 
Sutphen, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, Box 250. 

3-3 

EGGS — Brahmas, Langshans, Rocks, Reds. Orp- 
ingtons, Wydts., $1.50 per 15 prep'd. Ducks, 
geese. Catalogue free. M. H. Myers, Edom, Va. 

3-4 

PRICE LIST AND DESCRIPTION OF GENER- 

al valuable breeds free in America's leading 
strains. Low prices. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Humphrey Marshall, R. 1, Sadieville, Ky. 

SINGLE COMB BUFF LEGHORNS, BUFF OR- 

pingtons, and Ringlet Barred Rocks. Extra 
quality. Hogan tested. 15 eggs $1.75, prepaid. 
C. R. Ward, Hartford, Ky., Route 4. 

PORTERS POULTRY PLACE, BUTLER, IND. — 

Extra nice Toulouse geese, White Leghorns, 
White Rocks, White crested Black Polish, White 
African Guineas, also pedigreed Chester White 
Swine, up-to-date blood lines. Stock and eggs. 

EGGS — From pure bred stock. Sheppard's 331 
egg strain Anconas 15-$3.00; 100-$15.00. Park's 
bred-to-lay Barred Rocks, 15-$1.50: 100-$7.50. 
White Orpingtons, 15-$1.50; 100-$7.50. 10 other 
breeds, 15-$1.50, 100-$7.50. Free catalog on 
chicks and eggs. Can furnish eggs in 500 and 
1000 lots. Get my prices. Mid-Oak Poultry 
Farm, R. 4, Box 500, Bloomington, Dl. 3-3 

50 BRED TO LAY BARRED ROCK C0CKER- 

els. 10 R. C. Ancona Cockerels. Write Mrs. 
T. i R. Tilton, Lake Crystal, Minn, R. No. 1. 

1-4 



BREEDER'S CARDS 



SEVERAL VARIETIES 

SHEPPARD S. C. ANCONA AND PENNSYL- 

vania S. C. W. Leghorn eggs for hatching, 
$2.50 per 15. H. E. Ritter, Middleburg, Pa. 

90 BREEDS— Poultry, Eggs, Chicks, Dogs, Pig- 
eons, Hares, Ferrets, Parrots. Bargain list 
free. Bergey's Farm, Telford, Pa. 2-3 

BARRED AND BUFF ROCKS, WHITE WY- 

andottes. Stock and eggs for sale. Jacob 
Bower, Barberton, Ohio. 2r3 

60 VARIETIES— Prize winning Geese, Ducks, 
Turkeys, Chickens, Stock, Eggs, cheap. F. 
Damann, Farmington, Minn. 2-4 

SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND RED COCK- 

erels, pullets, eggs for hatching. Heavy lay- 
ers. Prices right. Wild Mallard Duck eggs. 
Hattie Harper, Potomac, 111. 

BARGAINS IN COCKERELS— Parks Rocks, 
Barron Wyandottes, Ferris Leghorns $7.50 up. 
Half price if taken now. Alex Davidson, Glen 
Campbell, Pa. 1-4 

FANCY POULTRY FOR SALE— 30 Varieties 
catalogue free. Herman Blumer, Berger, Mis- 
souri. 12-6 

TURKEYS 

BOURBON RED EGGS— $4.00 per dozen, post- 
paid. Mathews Moore, Sparta, Ky. 

MAMMOTH WHITE HOLLAND TURKEY 

Eggs. Merrill Tucker, Merrynook, , New Bruns- 
wick, New Jersey. 4-2 

LARGE WHITE HOLLAND TURKEY EGGS, 

45c each, $10.50 for 25 postpaid. Mrs. Chas. 
Mills. , Plainyille, Kans. 

BRONZE GOBBLERS $10— Eggs 10 for $6.00, 
prepaid. Order now. Aaron J. Felthouse, 
Goshen, Ind. 2-6 

SIEVED LACED WYANDOTTES 



SILVER LACED WYANDOTTE BABY CHICKS, 

High quality. Reasonable prices. Catalogue 
Free. South Kenton Poultry Farm, Kenton, 
Ohio. 

SIEVED LACED WYANDOTTE EGGS— 15-$1.50 
prepaid. E. A. York, McNabb, til. 3-3 

CERNEY'S FAMOUS SILVER LACED WYAN- 

dottes— Eggs 15-$1.50, 100-$8.00 prepaid. John 
Cerney, Cobden, 111. 

SILVER WYANDOTTES— Eggs from quality 
stock only. $1.50 per 15, $7.00 per 100. Lura 
Rivers, Charles City, Iowa. 3-2 

PUREBRED SILVER LACED WYANDOTTE 

and Partridge Rock eggs $1.50 setting, post- 
paid. Winnie Mc Conachie, Perryville, Mo., 
R. 3. » 2-2 

PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES 



PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES — Blue Ribbon 
Winners. Eggs $3.00 per 15. Baby Chix, 35c 
each, all prepaid. W. H. Riggle, Murray, Iowa 

2-3 



BUFF WYANDOTTES 



BUFF WYANDOTTES— Standard bred, farm 
raised, healthy and vigorous. Stock culled by 
state expert. Stock and eggs at moderate prices. 
No. chicks. Willis Brown, Highland Farm, 
Slippery Rock, Pa. 3-2 

WHITE WYANDOTTES 

WHITE WYANDOTTES — 255 egg strain. Won 
six first 1922. Prices low. Circular free. Nick 
Fleck, Plymouth, Indiana. 4-2 

EGGS — 2 pens White Wyandottes. Bred from 
$35.00 Keeler male bird, $3.00-15, $2.00-15. 
Farm range $1.00-15, $6.00-100. Cockerels $3.00 
each, 2-$5.00. Mrs. C. C. Calhoun, Grafton, Dl. 

KEELER STRAIN WHITE WYANDOTTE EGGS 

$1.50 per 15, $3 per 30, $10 per 100. Mrs. 
Andreas I/Oge, Spades, Did. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES — Eggs 15-$1.25, 50- 
$3.50, 100-$6.00. Orchard Poultry Farm, St. 
Peter, Dl., Box 9S. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES — Trapnested heavy lay- 
ers, 250 eggers. State show winners and club 
specials. Circular. Eggs $3, $5, $7.50. H. 
G. Kavanaugh, R. 7, Peoria, Dl. 



BREEDER'S CARDS 



WHITE WYANDOTTES 

EGGS FOR HATCHING— from Martins strain, 
White Wyandottes, culled and tested, vigorous 
fouls, heavy layers, $1.25 for 15. Neuman 
Ellestad, Spring Grove, Minn. 2-2 

SUPREME QUALITY WHITE WYANDOTTES, 

Regals. Eggs $1.50 up from winners. Mating 
list. W. E. Lunstrum, 2826 Schoal, Terre 
Haute, Ind. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES— Choice, selected hatch- 
ing eggs from healthy, winter layers. $1.50 
per 15, prepaid. H. C. Johnson, Knox, Pa. 
Route 3. 3-2 

WHITE WYANDOTTES— Exhibition and Heavy 
Egg Laying strain combined. Mating list free. 
T. C. Rafferty, Canton, Illinois. 2-3 

WHITE WYANDOTTE EGGS— from healthy, 
winter layers. $2.00-15, $8.00-100, prepaid. 
Aden Sager. Parkersburg, niinois. 2-3 

PUREBRED WHITE WYANDOTTE EGGS — 

$1.25-15, $7.00-100, prepaid. W. O. Ketchum, 
Downing, Mo. 3-2 

"AMERICA'S BEST" WHITE WYANDOTTES— 

The year around layers. Eggs for hatching, 
$2.00 per 15. J. E. Jackson, Avon, Dlinois. 

POULTRY TONIC 

EGOTONE MAKES LAYERS OUT OF LOAF- 

ers. Don't keep unprofitable hens. Make them 
lay or chop their heads off. Egotone increases 
egg production in a natural way. I guarantee 
that it will double or treble ordinary egg yield. 
Helps hens during moult. Send $1 for package 
prepaid. M. W. Kriman, Box 624, South Fork, 
Pa. 

POULTRY SHOW 



MADISON SQUARE GARDEN SHOW— Buyer's 
Guide (list of exhibitors) free. Official Marked 
Catalog 75 cents. Both books very valuable. 
Send for them. Address D. Lincoln Orr, Sec'y, 
Box 23, Orr's Mills — Cornwall, N. Y. 

POULTRY REMEDIES 

DORAN'S GAPE REMEDY CURES GAPES OR 

money back. 25c post paid. W. H. Doran, 
Brandenburg, Ky. 2-4 

REAL ESTATE 

WANT TO HEAR FROM OWNER HAVING 

poultry farm or other property for sale. State 
cash price and particulars. John J. Black, 
278th St., Chippewa Falls, Wis. 

$8250.00 BUYS "RIVERSIDE" TEN ACRES. 

Ideal for Poultry. Box 181, Nora-Springs, la. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

SQUABS $13 PER DOZEN IN N. Y. MARKET. 

Pay better than poultry. The Standard Squab 
book. Most complete up-to-date and practical 
Pigeon and Squab raising book ever published. 
Over 400 pages. 200 illustrations. Cloth $2, 
post paid. Rabbit, Milk Goat and Beekeeping 
books, free circular. V. M. Couch, Ithaca, N. Y. 

PRINTING 

PRINTING — 1000 Letterheads or Envelopes, 

$3.25; 500, $2.00. Get price list. Seliger's, 

959 Frankford Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 3-2 

250 ENVELOPES $1.10; 500, $1.75 POSTPAID. 

Womble Press, Bearcreck, N. C. 3-2 

PRINTING OF THE BETTER KIND FOR PAR- 

ticular poultry breeders. Highest quality, low- 
est prices, prompt service. Free cut service. 
Each job carries a distinctive, individual touch. 
Price list and samples free. Prompt Print 
Shop, Box 2114, Waverly, Iowa. 2-3 

QUALITY PRINTING PAYS— Samples for 
stamp. Cuts furnished. Ideal Press, D-324 
Julian, Denver, Colo. 1-4 

BETTER POULTRY PRINTING— Prepaid every- 
where for half what others charge. Being 
specialists we invariably please our 5000 satis- 
fled customers. 'When disgusted, try us. Every 
order filled under our guaranteed quality ser- 
vice. Latest cuts. Interesting samples, special 
bargain sheet for stamp. Model Printing Com- 
pany. Manchester. Iowa. 9-13 

1,000 20-tt>. HAMMERMILL BOND LETTER- 

heads $3.75; 5,000, $15.00. Distinctive display, 
highest quality workmanship and prompt ser- 
vice guaranteed. AVaverly Publishing Co., Box 
2014. Waverly, Iowa. 2-8 



Feeding 
Your Chicks 
for Quick Results 

ONE pound of nourishing, well-balanced feed now while 
chicks are little builds them up faster than twice as 
much will later. 

Start your chicks on Globe Chick Mash. They like it; 
every particle digests easily, and its body-building prop- 
erties hurry along the time when you'll have young 
cockerels to eat or sell, and early laying pullets. 

Encourage exercise by scattering Globe Chick Scratch 
Feed in the litter — make them work hard to get it. This 
hustling activity strengthens muscles and stirs up a 
hearty appetite for more Globe Chick Mash, and keeps the 
digestive organs in good condition. 

The variety of cereal, animal and vegetable protein in 
this mash is just what chicks need to make growth at a 
time when every little mouthful pays you 100% returns 
in added weight, strength and vigor. 

DICK ( N SON'S 

Globe Chick Mash 

w WITH DRIED BUTTERMILK 

From hungry chicks to money-making flocks 




There is a special Dickinson feed for every age from 
the three-day chick to the heavy-laying hen. From 
Globe Chick Mash they step right up to Globe Growing 
Mash, which keeps them growing when growth can be 
cheaply made. A little setback in development at this 
time is never made up. Don't waste your time and 
money experimenting — insist on Globe Brand Poultry 
Feeds. 

1 our dealer sells Globe Poultry 
Feeds or will get them if you 
insist. There is no substitute. 

THE ALBERT DICKINSON CO. 
CHICAGO 




Minneapolis 



Buffalo 
New York 



Boston Baltimore 
Pittsburgh 



? T HE ALBERT DICKINS 

~ . CHICAGO. ILL 



„ guaranteed analysis 

 are dis- 
cussing them as being unworthy of 
the honor they seek. 

Some have investigated the Rhode 
Island Whites thoroughly, and have 
frankly favored their admittance if 
they meet the necessary require- 
ments; others, not having time or 
caring to make this investigation,, 
have grudgingly favored their ad- 
mittance if they merited it, at the 
same time giving the impression that 
they had no merit; and the rest can- 
not "see" the Whites under any con- 
ditions and are stubbornly opposed to 
their admission to the Standard. 

I have read these articles from 
time to time, but as I am very busy, 
have not answered any writer speci- 
fically. In this article I am going 
to answer some of their arguments 
briefly as I see it, and to touch 
briefly on the Rhode Island Whites 
as being especially profitable to the 
small breeder or fancier, or "back- 
lotter" as he is called. Without them 
there would be no large shows, little 
incentive for the laying contests, very 
few poultry journals, a smaller A. 
P. A. — in fact — the whole industry 



would suffer. And any variety that 
is profitable to this class of breeders 
should be in the Standard of Per- 
fection. 

The most important objection, as 
given by most writers, and which 
does not appear reasonable, is that 
there are too many varieties in the 
Standard at present. No worthy 
variety that is popular, and has dis- 
tinct type, should be opposed. There 
are a great many varieties in the 
Standard that are no longer popular 
as judged by the number of exhibits 
at the shows in all parts of the 
country, and were it a question of 
making room, some of these varieties 
that have lost their popularity could 
be taken out of the Standard. This 
would be foolish, however, as all 
these varieties have their champions 
who favor them, and it would be a 
blow to the breeding of Standard var- 
ieties. This is true likewise of the 
new breeds that are popular and are 
seeding admission. There should al- 
ways be room in the Standard for 
another popular variety, providing it 
has distinct type. Rhode Island 
Whites are popular. This is proven 
by their entry at the leading shows 
which oftentimes is larger than that 
of some of the Standard varieties 
that are pupular today. And the 
number of breeders is increasing 
every day. 

Some say the Rhode Island Whites 
are not a distinct type, but resemble 
the White Wyandottes and White 
Rocks. This is absurd in the case 
of the former. Wyandottes are a 
bird of curves — are nearer a circle 
in shape — while the Rhode Island 
(Continued on Page 16) 




REGAL DORCAS EGGS-HALF PRICE 

More Regal Dorcas Prize-Winning Cockerels are hatched in May than in 
any other month of the year. 

"Why?" Because these Regal Dorcas White Wyandotte cockerels are so 
vigorous, so thrifty, and make such remarkable growth that many of them are 
fully matured in six months. 

At the Heart of America Show, Thanksgiving Week, 1920, I showed 
twelve cockerels in the single class and three in young pen class, all of my 
own breeding. Five of these cockerels were hatched in March and April, ten 
of them in May. 

As the season is so advanced, I have decided to reduce egg prices earlier 
than usual. You can now get eggs from the same identical birds that pro- 
duced these marvelous prize winners last season, for half price. 

AFTER MAY 8TH, EGG PRICES WILL BE AS FOLLOWS: 



Pens 1-10 (Exhibition Matings) — $5.00 per 15, $15.00 per 50, $25.00 
per 100. 

Pens 11-20— $3.00 per 15, $9.00 per 50, $17.00 per 100. 

Pens 21-40 (Dorcas)— $2.50 per 15, $7.50 per 50, $13.50 per 100. 

Pens 25-32 (Special Dorcas)— $5.00 per 15, $15.00 per 50, $25.00 per 100. 

Ail-Star Matings— $10.00 and $12.00 per 15. 

Utility Matings— $10.00 per 100. 



All eggs guaranteed 75 per cent or over strongly fertilized. These remarkably low prices will make a 
very heavy demand for the balance of the season. Rush your order from this ad, and produce some of Amer- 
ica's Finest White Wyandottes. 

Free — Send for Catalogue and Summer Sale List Ready May 1st. 

JOHN S. MARTIN Box 408 PORT DOVER, ONT., CANADA 



Page Number 6 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 




POULTRY KEEPER 

Quincy, Illinois 
401 Hampshire Street 
A Journal for Everyone Interested in Making 
Poultry Pay. 
Issued the First of Each Month 

Subscription Price: 
50c a year; Single Copies, 5c 
Foreign Postage: Twenty-five Cents a Year 
Additional. 

Entered at the Quincy, m., Post Office as 
Second Class Matter. 

Eemittances should be made by Draft, Money 
Order Express Order or Registered Letters. 
Small sums will be accepted in United States 
one or two cent postage stamps. 

Change of address— When this is desired, be 
sure to give old and new Post Office addresses. 

All subscribtions invariably discontinued at 
expiration. Subscribers will confer a favor by 
reporting to us irregularities in receiving the 
Poultry Keeper. 

Advertising rates made known on application. 

Poultry Keeper readers are cordially invited 
to express their opinion on any subject of 
poultry that will be of interest to our readers, 
give helpful talks to the inexperienced and ask 
questions in any department. 

A. OTIS ARNOLD, Editor. 

F. RAYMOND BENSON, Ass't Editor. 

THE PUBLISHER OF THIS 

MAGAZINE IS A 

LIFE MEMBER OF THE 

American Poultry Association 

PRESERVE EGGS NOW 

Each year many of our readers 
"put down eggs" in water glass for 
use the coming winter. Eggs are 
low in price now and it is a fine time 
to put them down. As the price be- 
gins to climb we all feel like send- 
ing them to market so it is usually 
a good plan to get them put away 
before June. 

Another reason for putting them 
down now is that the quality will 
probably be much better than it will 
after the hot weather sets in. So 
get at this now if you have not al- 
ready done so. 

Water Glass may be purchased at 
any drug store and to those of our 
readers who have never used it we 
might say — boil some water, and let 
it cool. Then put one part of water 
glass with nine or ten parts of the 
water. Put eggs in earthen crock 
and pour this over them, putting- 
saucer on eggs and stone on saucer 
to keep all the eggs submerged. Some 
tie a paper over the top to keep air 
and dust out. Place crock in cool 
dry place. Use only clean eggs. 

These eggs may be used all winter 
but of course readers of POULTRY 
KEEPER would never attempt to 
sell them. 



THE EARLY MOLTERS 

In the average flock some hens be- 
gin the moult early in the season and 
some of our experimental stations 
have told us that such hens were un- 
profitable fowls to keep. rerhaps 
that may be so but did you ever stop 
to think that perhaps the feeding and 
care had anything to do with the 
molt? Most hens will continue to 
lay as long as the ration is properly 
balanced — they cannot help it. Scanty 
or inferior rations throw them into 
the molt. We admit there are ex- 
ceptions to this rule but many a 
bird has been classed as a low pro- 
ducer when the owner was to blame. 

Induce the hens to eat all the mash 



possible. The more they eat, the 
more they' will lay and the later they 
will molt. Cut down on the amount 
of grain and let the hens have plenty 
of mash. Six pounds of grain per 
day should be enough for 100 hens 
during hot weather. 

It is profitable to keep the hens 
laying and when she does molt let 
her do so in as short a time as pos- 
sible. You can shorten the molt from 
four to ten weeks by proper feeding. 



STUDY YOUR BREED 

Altogether too often a would-be 
poultryman goes to a show and im- 
mediately selects a breed of poultry 
as just suiting him. In the course of 
a few months he finds that this par- 
ticular breed has many faults and it 
will depend largely on how he stud- 
ies the breed whether he will make a 
success or failure of the breed he 
has selected. 

As a general rule a breed is no 
better than the poultryman who 
keeps it. Two men may raise Black 
Minorcas, one may win at Madison 
Square Garden while the other could 
not be placed at the smallest show 
in the country. 

If the poultryman will spend time 
to study the breed he keeps, if he 
will master the details of improving 
his fowls — then he will find much 
less cause to change breeds or dis- 
continue poultry keeping. The best 
strain in America will regenerate un- 
less it has the guiding hand of a 
thoughtful poultryman to mate and 
rear it. No man can conduct a poul- 
try business in a haphazard way and 
make a success. Study your breed 
and plan to keep improvement con- 
stantly in your mind. 



WHEN THE FOWL IS SICK 



When the fowls are healthy and 
they are shelling out the eggs, we 
do not think about sickness and yet 
it is always well to be on the look- 
out for any signs which will give 
you an indication of disease. Always 
watch for the purplish tinge to the 
comb. Sometimes a white comb tells 
you that trouble is present. When 
the fowl appears sluggish, droopy 
and it has a desire to lie around you 
may rest assured it is not well. Keep 
watch for yellow-green or red drop- 
pings as a sure indicator of sickness. 
Occasional sneezing or a rattling in 
the throat is a danger signal and 
should demand your immediate at- 
tention. If the birds stay on the 
roost something is wrong. When a 
hen goes lame, look for the cause. 

When you notice anything the mat- 
ter with your fowls, separate them 
from the flock and write our Mr. 
Benson, of the Question and Answer 
Department. If you require a per- 
sonal reply he will be glad to write 
you fully, if a stamped envelope is 
enclosed with your inquiry. If you 
want the answer to appear in POUL- 
TRY KEEPER, no stamp need be 
sent. Remember however that we 
make up our forms for the paper a 
month in advance and in urgent cases 
a personal reply is much to be de- 
sired. 

We are proud of our Question and 
Answer Department for we believe it 
to be one of the best in the country. 



We invite our readers to take advant- 
age of the service v hich it renders 
and to write Mr. Benson as occasion 
may require. Remember that there 
is no charge for advice of this kind. 
We furnish this service free to all 
readers and it is but one of our ideas 
of giving the reader good value for 
his money. 



WASHED EGGS ARE IN- 
FERIOR 

The demand for clean eggs has be- 
come such a univerpal requirement 
that we find many poultrymen who 
make a practice of washin? the eggs 
which are dirty. This is detrimental 
to the keeping qualities of the eggs 
unless it is properly done. 

Covering the egg is a gelantinous 
substance which seals the pores. 
When the egg is dipped in a pail of 
water and scrubed as we have seen 
it done, this coating is removed, the 
pores of the shell opened and decom- 
position soon begins. 

Dirty eggs should not be sent to 
market but all dirt should be re- 
moved. When the egg is extremely 
dirty it is usually best to use such 
eggs at home but a small amount of 
dirt may be removed with a woolen 
rag which has been slightly damp- 
ened with water. If the egg is badly 
stained, this can usually be removed 
with a little cider vinegar. 

Clean nests will do much to over- 
come dirty eggs and the nesting ma- 
terial should be replaced often 
enough to keep it clean and fresh. 
Excelsior has been known to stain 
eggs so we recommend straw as be- 
ing the best all around nesting ma- 
terial. 



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164 pages full of valuable information for 
poultry raisers. Tells best breeds for eggs and 
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to handle incubators and brooders successfully. 
Also describes poultry diseases — how to avoid 
them. 

Contains full instruction on how to feed hens 
to keep them in best condition to sustain extra 
heavy egg production at all seasons, and to get 
eggs that will hatch strong, vigorous chicks, 
how to feed and raise chicks most rapidly to 
early maturity. We have had this book writ- 
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your copy. 

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White Wyandottes 

of Exhibition quality. Eggs to 
spare from 4 grand pens. Satis- 
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Fred Berlin, Allen, Mich. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 7 



>f 



W The real satisfaction-giving youngsters, that grow steadily 
and rapidly from the time they kick their way out ( 
shell until they are ready for market, the laying house c 
exhibition cage. That's the kind you should have — can hi 
you will keep up chick-health and chick-vigor. 
First, give them a strong start. From the first meal 




How to Raise 
inest Chicks 



the 



feed 



Pratts Butterm ilk Baby Chick Food 

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Then they are sure to grow, to develop strong, well-fleshed 
frames and abundant plumage, because this remarkable "baby 
food for baby chicks" contains exactly the food-elements th; 
make muscle, bone and feather, with scarcely any indigestibl 
fibre. Puttermilk in liberal quantity and finest quality. I 
saves chicks — raises chicks — prevents loss — brings the profits. 
Then keep the youngsters growing. From weaning age give 

Pratts Poultry Regulator 

in the regular ration. The guaranteed tonic and conditioner 
that growing chickens need to assist digestion and build up 
health — to increase vigor and vitality — to bring them safely to 
early maturity. Try this combination of chick feed and regula- 
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I'oar Money Back If YOU Are Not Satisfied" 
.1 dealer near you will supply both. 
PRATT FOOD CO., Philadelphia, Chicago. Toronto 

The answe To rapid growth and heavy fgz production — 
Pratts new Growin? and Laying Mashes and Scratch Feeds 



SO-' YEAR OF SERVICE 



KEEPING UP-TO-DATE 



A chance acquaintance told us a 
story of a back woods poultry farm- 
er of Northern Wisconsin Avhich is 
well worth repeating. 

It seems that a college president 
had been camping 35 miles from no- 
where back in the woods. Being in- 
terested in poultry to some extent 
he took notice of a nice flock of 
White Leghorns owned by a near-by 
farmer. The more he saw of the 
flock the more he became convinced 
that it would be a great surprise to 
the good wife to take home a case 
of eggs. So one day he approached 
the farmer, regarding the purchase 
of the eggs. Nothing was said as to 
price and on the day of the depar- 
ture the educator asked if the eggs 
were ready. He was assured they 
were packed and in readiness. 

"How much are they?" asked the 
president. 

"Let me see," returned the farmer 
as he hurried off to the house. In 
a few moments he was back with a 
newspaper and glancing down the 
quotations, stopped at the New York 
market report. "72 cents per dozen 
in New York. That makes $21.60 
for the thirty dozen." 

The college man stood aghast. 
Eggs were selling in the nearest town 
for 40 cents per dozen. 

This was told to the writer by the 
president himself and he remarked 
that if we could make all our readers 
keep as up to date on prices as this 
farmer, there would be more money 
in the poultry business. We would 
hardly be willing to urge our read- 
ers to ask prices which were con- 
sidered high and yet we do believe 
that they can get about what they 
ask. When you begin to cut prices, 
then you begin to loose money. Stick 
for a price which will give you a 
good margin of profit and get it. 



KAZMEIER TO EDIT "OK" 
POULTRY JOURNAL 



F, W. Kazmeier, who for several 
years has been Poultry Husbandman 
with the Extension Service of the 
Texas A. & M. College has resigned 
his position and beginning in April 
will take over the editorial work on 
The "OK" Poultry Journal of 
Mounds, Oklahoma in additional to 
his private business interests. Mr. 
Kazmeier will make his home at 
that Mr. Kazmeier has had such a 
wide experience in the poultry work 
in Texas and thruout the South and 
is so well versed on conditions con- 
fronting the southern poultrymen 
The "OK" Poultry Journal is fortun- 
ate in securing his services as its 
editor. 



NEW EXPRESS RULES AND 
REGULATIONS 



Some time ago the American Rail- 
way Express Company gave notice 
that it would file with the Interstate 
Commerce Commission a new traffic 
rate on poultry shipped to and from 
exhibition roofs and upon Standard- 
Bred Poultry shipped for breeding 
purposes. The information was giv- 
en out that the new rate would be 
increased double the first class rate. 
I immediately took the matter up 



with Mr. R. S. Wheeler, Traffic Man- 
ager of the Express Company, notify- 
ing the breeders and shippers of this 
country trrough the poultry press, 
and by letter and wire of the pro- 
posed increase in rate. Mr. Wheeler 
promised to withhold issuing the or- 
der for the new rate until he con- 
ferred with the executive head of 
the American Poultry Association. I 
have gone into the matter in detail 
with Mr. Wheeler. The new tariff 
will be effective June 1st, 1922. 

Changes in the classification and 
rates are entirely by way of more 
accurate statement of the present 
regulations under which shippers 
have been accustomed to get the rate 
on market poultry for shipment of 
poultry for exhibition purposes. The 
only increase in rates made is by 
making rules in regard to declaration 
of value so strict as to prevent put- 
ting a market value on poultry act- 
ually having greater value and not 
intended for market. 

The one actual change in rate is a 
reduction giving the rate of 1 1-2 
times the regular first-class rate to 
"fancy" poultry shipped in straw- 
board or fireboard coops. Under the 
old and present rate they paid double 



the first-class rate the same as in 
cloth covered coops. This is a con- 
cession and a reduction in rates. 

Mr. Wheeler, representing the 
American Express Co. met the repre- 
sentative of the American Poultry 
Association upon a business basis. 
The matter was discussed in detail 
and every phase and detail of same 
duly considered, the intent and de- 
sire of all being to make the rates 
fair alike to the shippers of Standard- 
Bred Poultry and the Express Com- 
pany. — American Poultry Associa- 
tion, Thos. F. Rigg, President. 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSTIP, MANAGE- 
MENT, CIRCULATION, ETC. 

Of the Poultry Keeper published monthly at 
Quincy. Illinois, required by the Aact of August 
24, 1912. 

Publisher, A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, 111. 

Editor, A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, III. 

Managing Editor, A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, 111. 

Business Manager, A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, 111. 

Owner, A. Otis Arnold, Quincy. 111. 

Known bondholders, mortgagees, and other se- 
curity holders, holding one per cent or more of 
the total amount of bonds, mortgages or other 
security. 

NONE. 

(Signed) A. OTIS ARNOLD. 

Sworn and subscribed to before me this 4th 
day of April, 1922. 

C. R. WARREN. 

Notary Public. 
My commission expires May 18, 1924. 



Page Number 8 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Wipe Out Every 
Rat and Mouse 



Amazing New Discovery Quickly Kills 
Them All. Not a Poison. 

Hats, Mice, Gophers — in fact all Rodents 
can now be wiped out easily and quickly. 
Imperial Virus will do it. This new dis- 
covery, is a fluid, true Virus. Entirely harm- 
less to humans, poultry, stock, pets, etc. 




Infects Rodents only. Greedily eaten on 
bait. Sets up burning fever. The pests com- 
municate it to others, and all die outside, 
hunting air and water. Imperial Virus is 
put up in sealed bottles, thus insuring full 
strength and potency. Only safe, sanitary 
method to overcome these pests. Protect 
your Poultry, especially Baby Chicks and Egg 
Hatches. 

YOU CAN GET YOURS FREE 

Here's how! Send £1.00 today (currency, 
M. O., Checks, etc.) and we will give you 
by return mail, postpaid, two regular, full 
sized (double strength) §1.00 bottles of Im- 
perial Virus. Use. one to rid your place of 
these pests, and sell the other to a neighbor, 
thus getting yours free. Special inducements 
to represent us. 

If more convenient, send no money, just 
vour name and address to Imperial Labora- 
tories, Dept. 417, 2110 Grand Ave., Kansas 
Citv, Mo. Pay postman $1.00 and few cents 
postage when two bottles arrive. Guaranteed 
to do the work to your entire satisfaction 
within 30 days or your ?1.00 will be cheerfully 
refunded. 



RAISE RHODE ISLAND REDS 

-HE B ESf ALL PURPOSE BREED 



Your name and address will bring free 
educational literature on Rhode Island 
Reds and information why they are 
the greatest money-making poultry 
breed; also catalogs and circulars from 
leading Red breeders. For full informa- 
tion address 

RHODE ISLAND RFTJCLTTB of AMERICA 
W. H. Card, Sec., Box 914, Manchester. Conn. 
This ad paid for by 0. P. Scott, Peoria, III. | 





©WIS 



No lighter 

As a subscriber to POULTRY KEEPER I 
wish you would answer a question for me and 
help me out. I bought some cockerels of a 
well known breeder and brought them home. 
Not wishing to mate my pens yet I put them 
in with a cockerel of mine but I was afraid 
they would kill him. Instead he scared them 
so that they would not come down off the 
roosts. "Would this mean that they were poor 
breeders ? 

Mrs. M. E. R., Michigan. 

Personally we would rather have 
cockerels that had plenty of fight in 
them but just the same I would not 
discard them for lack of it and no 
other reason. Vigor is usually shown 
by pep or the fighting spirit in cock- 
erels but sometimes they develop this 
as they grow older. 



Loosing Feathers 

I have some chickens that are losing the 
feathers on top of their heads and they soon 
look bald. Could you tell me what causes this 
condition. 

H. V. B., Md. 

If the males are affected as well 
as the hens I would say that it was 
caused by the depluming mite but 
if the hens alone are affected we 
believe that you will find that it is 
caused by the males. Often an over 
attentive male will pull the feathers 
from the head of the hens. The best 
remedy is to rub carbolated vaseline 
into the bald place and keep the 
males separate for a little while. 



Two Breeds of Barred Rocks 

Can yau advise me whether there are two 
breeds of Barred Rocks, the medium size and 
the big boned? 

C. J. C, Nebraska. 
There has been quite a discussion 
regarding the light and dark Barred 
Rocks but so far as we know there 
is no small and large breeds. The 
Standard of Perfection is the only 




Who Originated the First Oil 
Burning Canopy Brooder? 



[Super Sol-Hot 
! Heater for Canopy 
j Brooders and 
I Incubators 



l There has been some confusing statements made with re- 
/ gard to who originated the oil burning canopy brooder. In 
order that the poultry raising public may know the FACTS 
* we show here the FIRST one ever made. It was made by H. M. 
Sheer years ago, and tested for several 
years before being offered to the public. 

From this first and original brooder the 
now famous Sol-Hot Brooder was per- 
fected — all of the improvements are 
covered by patents issued to H. M. Sheer. 

The Only Heater 
With Positive Oil Control 

The Super Sol-Hot is the only heater on the market with a positive oil con- 
trol—it is accomplished with a patent thermostat and float (like on a carburetor) which 
maintains a constant oil level that insures an even burning flame all the time. Sol-Hot 
requires no regulating— it has no valves or springs to adjust — it is automatic. It is equipped 
with patent non-carbonizing Metal Vaporizer which does away with the old-fashioned 
troublesome wicks and asbestos ring vaporizers. 

Why Buy Imitations — Get the Best 

When you are in the market for an Oil Burning Canopy 
tep^ Brooder, come to the originators for it, be on the safe side 
: *tf: and get the best. Send us your name and address and 
get our free descriptive folder telling all about this 
better heater and canopy brooder. Get the facts 
and you'll never buy anything but Sol-Hot. 

H. M. SHEER COMPANY 

Dept. 28 , Qalncy, Illinois (251 






F. Raymond Benson 

thing we have to guide us and it 
gives but one weight. Is someone 
trying to sell you undersized birds 
and telling you the above stuff? 



To 3Iake a Capon Set 

I have some capons and wish you would tell 
me how to make them set and care for baby 
chicks. 

E. F. J., Iowa. 

We have never had any personal 
experience trying to make a capon 
set and if any of our readers have 
they will oblige us by passing the 
good news along. As to giving them 
chicks this can easily be done. We 
have seen a few chicks placed under 
them at night and the next morning 
you would think they had a million 
chicks to see them fuss around. Pos- 
sibly they may be alright for brood- 
ing chicks but still we feel that a 
good brooder has them beat and will 
be more economical. 



Preserve Eggs 

Please tell me if you know of anything bet- 
ter to preserve eggs in than water glass. 

3Irs. K. H., Illinois. 

We believe that water ^glass is by 
far the best thing that has been 
found. We have kept eggs for two 
years and they were in good condi- 
tion when used. However a year or 
eight months is about the longest 
you should keep them. Some folks 
use salt and others oats and there 
are dozens of ways to put down eggs 
for winter but if you will use water 
glass one year we feel sure you will 
prefer it to the other methods. 



Poultry Droppings 

Can you give me the composition of poultry 
droppings or tell me how to mix it so as to 
have a good fertilizer. I like POULTRY 
KEEPER better every issue. 

J. J. P., Illinois. 

The composition of poultry drop- 
pings is as follows: Water 57.00, 
Nitrogen 1.15, Phosphoric acid .9 6, 
Potash .39. When bone meal or 
phosphate rock is used in connection 
with poultry droppings you have a 
very effective fertilizer. 



Not Yet 

Have the Rhode Island Whites been admitted 
to the Standard yet? When wiU they be ad- 
mitted? 

E. J. C, New York. 

They have not been admitted yet 
but we presume that the question 
will come up at the annual meeting 
this summer. We understand that 
the Revision Committee have voted 
against admitting the breed, at their 
recent meeting. We cannot see why 
this breed should be kept out when 
there is so much dead timber in the 
Standard. If the American Poultry 
Association ever hopes to regain the 
ground it has lost it has got to have 
a different program. 



Clucks Die in Shell 

I wonder if you can tell me what causes 
the chicks to die in the shell. I keep the 
temperature at 103 degrees but out of 1GO 
eggs I have from 100 to 120 with dead chicks 
in them. If you can help me out on this 
proposition I will be much obliged. 

W. K.j Missouri. 

There may be many reasons for 
this condition. A lack of moisture 
may cause it. We suggest that a 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 9 



hygrometer be used. Weak breeding 
stock may cause it. Uneven tem- 
perature may be to blame. There are 
so many possible causes that we 
could hardly guess at your particu- 
lar problem. However we would 
venture to ring out a rag in warm 
water and spread over the eggs just 
before they hatch and see if that 
would help. If we had more par- 
ticulars, perhaps we might help you 
out. 

Leg Weakness 

I want to ask you a question. I have seventy 
Buff Orpington baby chicks and they seem to 
• row like weeds but are going down on their 
shanks. Is this leg weakness and if so what 
is the remedy? They are growing so well it 
seems a shame to loose them. 

H. S., Illinois. 

This is leg weakness without a 
doubt. Usually a lack of bone form- 
ing material in the food will cause 
the trouble. Hard floors is another 
cause. Put sand on the floor and 
hay chaff on the sand. Feed grain 
in this litter to induce exercise. 
Remedy ration and do not run the 
temperature too high. Get the chicks 
out on the ground as soon as you 
can or if this is impossible try put- 
ting a piece of grass sod, dirt side 
up, in the brooder and let the little 
fellows dig at it. We believe there 
is a mineral element in the dirt which 
the chicks need for growth and 
health. 



yard with a cover in solving such a 
problem. We dislike to cut the 
wing feathers. 



Blood Spots in Eggs 

Will you tell me what causes blood spots in 
eggs and the remedy? 

O. M. , Wyoming. 

This inquiry received a personal 
reply because a stamp was inclosed 
but the complaint seems so general 
that we will answer in this column. 
Blood spots which appear in eggs is 
due to a rupture of a small blood 
vessel during the formation of the 
egg. This rupture may be caused by 
laying a very large egg or being over- 
fat. Some hens seem to be so con- 
stituted that they lay this kind of 
eggs continually. As a general rule 
the best plan is to dispose of such 
hens. Sometimes if the feed is re- 
duced and the hen gets back to norm- 
al weight the trouble will cease but 
we know of no treatment which will 
prove satisfactory. Such eggs must 
not be sent to market as they are 
sure to cause complaint. 



Roup Weakens Breeding Stock 

My chickens had the roup last winter and 
I doctored them and they got better but now 
it is breaking out again. Would this hurt them 
as breeders? 

N. K. X. Oklahoma. 

Regular readers of this column 
know that the editor is a regular 
crank on vigor of breeding stock. 
We put health at the head of the 
list of our requirements. Roup weak- 
ens any fowl and we very much doubt 
if it ever pays to doctor a fowl which 
has it. And under no circumstances 
would we put a fowl in the breeding 
pen which we had to doctor all 
winter. 



Her Leghorns Fly 

Will you please tell me how to crop my 
Leghorn's wings so they can't fly over the 
fence. 

Mrs. C. H. J., Kansas. 

Cut the primary and secondary 
feathers of ONE wing. Do not cut 
the feathers of both wings. We pre- 
fer to put a wire along the top of 
the fence so that the fowls will hit 
it in flying over. After much exper- 
imenting we have adopted a low 



Speckled Sussex 

1. Does the Standard of Perfection describe 
the Speckled Sussex? 

2. What do you think of this breed? 

Mrs. H. E. P., Kentucky 

1. Yes. 

2. This breed has never been 
pushed for its egg production and 
as a result has never been very pop- 
ular. It is a good sized fowl, hence 
is a good market bird but in this 
country we must have eggs and lots 
of them. The plumage of this breed 
is against it ever being as popular 
as many of our other breeds. We 
have stood by them at the shows and 
heard would be poultrymen pass 
them by with the remarks that they 
were mongrels. The variety of their 
plumage does not give the appear- 
ance of thorough breds and they will 
not be largely bred by beginners for 
this reason. There is no question 
but they are good fowls but we em- 
phasize egg production and looks in 
this country. 



Rhode Island Reds 

1. Are the Rhode Island Reds a large or 
small breed? 

2. Are they good layers? 

3. Do they breed true to Standard require- 
ments ? 

4. Would you breed them if you were in my 
place ? 

5. What would a setting of good eggs be 
worth ? 

13. J. L., Illinois. 

1. They belong to the American 
class and are considered as being me- 
dium in size, compared with the Leg- 
horn and Brahma. They are larger 
than in years gone by and we see 
cockerels now which are as large 
as Rocks. 

2. They are good layers of brown 
eggs. 

3. This has been the one big 
draw back of the Reds. They breed 
much truer now than they did ten 
years ago and one can easily produce 
good birds now. 

4. We bred them for ten years 
and if we had the room would put 
in a pen today. We like them first 
class. 

5. Depends on what you mean by 
the wbrd good. Not less than $5 
should buy you a start. We would 
pay $10 or $15 and get some better 
stock. Remember you can buy qual- 
ity cheaper than you can take years 
to breed it up. 



Produces Infertile Eggs 

I have a White Leghorn which produces 
infertile eggs. I know because I trap nest her. 
Could I ever hope to get fertile eggs from her? 

A. J. A., Wisconsin. 

You might try mating her to 
another male and feeding more oats 
and less corn. Also increase the 
beef scraps to some extent. Perhaps 
if she had more range it would help. 
There are hens which never produce 
fertile eggs and we recall experiment- 
ing with such a hen a number of 
years ago and she never produced a 
single fertile egg. When you locate 
such a hen we would just put her 
into the egg pen or ship her to 
market. 



Who Said Egg Factory-. 

I would like to know if the expression "Egg 
Factory" is properly used. My friends say it 
is highly improper. On the other hand I think 
it is proper. 

H. M.. New York. 

(Continued on Page 18) 




Dr. David Roberts 
Poultry Tablets 

A combination of sulphocarbolates of 
calcium, sodium and zinc for the treat- 
ment and prevention of White Diar- 
rhea and all intestinal infections of 
baby chicks, as well as poultry in all 
stages of life and productivity. Drink- 
ing water for poultry should be medi- 
cated to overcome and prevent disease. 
The annual poultry loss by disease is 
stupendous---over 50 per cent. 

Save Your Chicks 

Serve in fresh water. Aids digestion. 
Permits food to nourish them through 
their babyhood, the non-productive 
period when hardy bone and strong 
muscle is needed to give them a good 
start in their race for the laying period. 
They will reward you manyfold later 
on. Give them proper protection and 
you will find there is big money in 
poultry. Sold in tablet form. 

50 Tablets 50 Cents 

Poultry will drink when too sick to eat. 
Baby chick organs are peculiarly sensi- 
tive. They need something to ward off 
disease, particularly that most dreaded 
and destructive disease white diarrhea. 

A Tablet A Day 
Keeps Disease Away 

One package, 50 tablets, enough to 
medicate 50 gallons of water, a most 
efFectiveandeconomical preventive, for 
only one cent a gallon. Use Dr. 
David Roberts Poultry Tonic, Louse 
Powder, Poultry Cholera Medicine, 
Poultry Roup Paste and Disinfectall, 
all known and tried prescriptions. 
Sold by our druggist, dealer, or direct. 

Dr. David Roberts Practical Home Veteri- 
narian, a veterinary doctor book, regular price 
?i.oo. tells you how to treat your own poul- 
try, also describes our 44 prescriptions — a 
prescription for every animal ailment. We 
will tell you how to get it FREE. 

Our Special Introductory 

Offer Send 25 cents, just one half the 
regular price, for one package Dr. 
David Roberts Poultry Tablets, sent 
you postpaid, providing you give us 
the name of your druggist or dealer. 

DR. DAVID ROBERTS 
VETERINARY CO. 

135 Grand St., Waukesha, Wis. ; 




Drinking 
To Their 

health 




Page Number 10 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



THE HOME OF GLOBE FEEDS 

The Albert Dickinson Company, Chicago, Illinois 




The picture of the immense feed plant shown 
herewith will give the reader a fairly good idea of 
the immensity of the feed business, and will show 
what proportions the poultry business and its ad- 
juncts can be developed by putting out a strictly 
quality product, backed by fair treatment. 

The Albert Dickinson Company, Chicago, 111., is 
a pioneer in the manufacturing of a mixed poultry 
ration. Twenty-one years ago they made their 
first poultry feed. Right from the start the 
Albert Dickinson Co., has been an advocate of 
quality feeds. They made feeds to produce cer- 
tain results and never put a feed on the market 
until they knew just what it would do. With a 
definite object in view, namely, produce results, 
there is no wonder that their business has devel- 
oped to the immense proportions it enjoys today. 
There is a difference between making feeds to 
produce results and making feeds to utilize some 
by-product. 

The same man, Mr. Harold A. Abbott, that 
started to make the Albert Dickinson Company's 
Globe Feed twenty-one years ago is still on the 
job and has charge of that important part of their 
business. His life work has been to study feeds 
and make Globe Feeds the best that could be 
made. He has not let sliding markets, cheap in- 
gredients, etc., swerve him from his purpose. 
Globe Feeds must be the best and must produce 
results. That has been the star to which his 
cart was hitched. The very best of scientific and 
practical men have always been sought to help 
in perfecting and keeping perfect the line of 
GLOBE FEEDS. There is not a poultry man rais- 
ing chickens today but what has known of GLOBE 
FEEDS ever since there has been such a thing as 
a manufactured feed, and these same poultry rais- 



ers know that GLOBE FEEDS have always been 
a quality product. 

Today the Albert Dickinson Company's milling 
plant and warehouses cover acres of ground. They 
can load and unload 200 cars of grains and feed 
in one day. To take care of this immense business 
requires an office that is a city block long, 420 
feet. This office is a model of efficiency and it is 
but to make one wonder, to go through it and see 
how modern business is conducted these days. 

It is the business of the up-to-date feed manufacturer 
to know just what his feed will do, besides having a 
correct chemical knowledge of it. To know just how 
GLOBE FEEDS act and work under normal conditions 
the Albert Dickinson Co., has its own poultry farm right 
in their own back yard. Here they raise about 800 
chicks per annum and keep 300 to 400 pullets and hens 
on trap nest records the year around. Effects of the 
feed and conditions are carefully noted and the knowl- 
edge obtained for the benefit of their customers. 

Realizing that there are so many practical things that 
the poultry raiser must do or the best feed in the world 
would not give satisfactory results, they orgainzed what 
is known as The Globe Poultry Service Club. This is 
probably the laregst poultry club in the world today. 
The members not only receive very practical bulletins 
from time to time, but they have the privilege of writing 
in their poultry problems and they are given the best 
attention of the poultry experts in charge of this de- 
partment. Many a poultry business has been saved by 
the advice sent out by this Globe Service Club. It is 
practical and it is free. 

The experiement plant can carry on its experiments 
and disseminate its knowledge without prejudice, which 
is not always the case with the experiment stations run 
under Government or State supervision. 

The editor of this paper is always glad to tell its 
readers of anything that will help them, and we do not 
hesitate to say that GLOBE FEEDS and the Globe Ser- 
vise Club are two things every reader ought to have. If 
you wish to join the Globe Club just drop them a line, 
tell them you would like to join the Globe Poultry Club 
and you might mention the fact that you read about it 
in The Poultry Keeper. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 11 



TIMELY TOPICS 

Readers are asked to co-operate in making this Department 
interesting by sending in suitable items to, F. Raymond 
Benson, 915 Augusta Ave., Elgin, Illinois. 



Poultry auction sales are being 
held weekly by the Chamber of Com- 
merce at Dublin, Georgia. 

We hear that $800 was paid at 
Madison Square Garden Show for one 
Jersey Black Giant. That looks as 
if business was picking up. 

Live pigeon shooting in New Zea- 
land has been made unlawful by a 
bill that has passed the legislative 
council. This sport, if it may be 
called such, has never been very pop- 
ular in the United States. 

The Ladies Aid Society of the First 
Methodist Church, Elgin, Illinois, 
took up a collection of eggs and sent 
them to the Wesley Memorial Hospi- 
tal, of Chicago at Easter time. This 
is an excellent idea. 

# =fc 

Dean Davenport of the College of 
Agriculture and director of the agri- 
culture experiment station at the 
University of Illinois has resigned 
his position. He has been connected 
with the University for a number of 
years and many will regret to see 
him leave his post. We have not 
learned his future plans. 

"John, John," whispered the 
alarmed wife, "Wake up John! There 
are buglars in the house and I be- 
lieve they are frying those eggs I 
had in the pantry." "Well, what do 
we care," mumbled John, rolling 
over, "They are Chinese eggs and if 
the burglars don't die in the house, 
we will be lucky." 

# # * 

The United States Department of 
Agriculture has released a film on 
"Bees, How They Live and Work." 
This should be a real source of in- 
formation and no doubt will do much 
to stimulate interest in bee keeping. 

# * * 

The editor of this department 
would be glad to get hold of some 
Cochin Bantams for experimental 
purposes and if you have any, write 
him as per above address. 

Mr. Harvey C. Wood, of Bound 
Brook, N. J., has been elected a 
member of the Board of Directors of 
the National Poultry Institute. Mr. 
Wood is a well known poultryman 
and breeds Light Brahmas of nation- 
al repute. 

# * # 

The Illinois Ancona Club is get- 
ting well under way under the presi- 
dent Irwin J. Berlin, Princeton, Illi- 
nois. Apparently this club is meet- 
ing with enthusiasm from the breed- 
ers of Anconas. 

The "Lamona," the new white egg- 
laying, general-purpose, fowl which 
is being developed by the United 
States Department of Agriculture 
made its bow at Madison Square Gar- 



den Show last winter. We have had 
several letters relative to this breed 
but understand that there is no breed- 
ing stock available for the public, as 

yet. 

* * # 

We understand that the Govern- 
ment wishes to change the Parcel 
Post Laws and Regulations in regard 
to shipping eggs, in such a way as 
tc be detrimental to poultrymen. This 
should not be done. Poultrymen 
should be encouraged to ship by Par- 
cel Post. 

# * * 

The joys of hunting eggs laid by 
one's own hens is real, unadulterated 
pleasure which will not soon be for- 
gotten. 

Mr. C. J. Yoder, Grantsville, Mary- 
land, breeder of White Indian Run- 
ner Ducks is building a fine new 
duck house, 20x40 feet and two 
stories high. He will make a special- 
ty of baby ducks and hatching eggs. 
This is certainly a good testimonial 
for friend duck. 

Smart City Visitor — (Showing a 
chestnut burr) — "Say, Rube, what 
d'ye call this?" 

Rube — "You dern fool, that's a 
porcupine's egg." 

* * * 

We understand that Mr. George B. 
Ferris, Grand Rapids, Michigan, the 
well known breeder of Single Comb 
White Leghorns, is prepaying the ex- 
press on fowls. So far as we know 
this is the first large breeder to do 
this and no doubt it will increase his 
business to even larger proportions. 

Mr. H. H. Verdery is now con- 
nected with the poultry department 
of the Henry F. Mitchell Seed Com- 
pany, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Mr. Verdery has been well known 



WORTH MILLIONS TO POULTRY 

Thirteen years ago, I lost 3,800 
fowls in three weeks from Roup, 
Cholera and White Diarrhea when a 
Scientist in a few days — by a newly 
discovered formula turned my PEST 
RIDDEN Fowls into the prettiest 
flock I ever saw. I bought his form- 
ula and named it "OCULUM". Now, 
Disease has no horrors for me, I have 
cured fowls by the thousand. 

As a test, I put sick fowls with a 
well flock and "OCULUM" healed the 
sick and kept the well ones well. 

"OCULUM" makes hens lay and 
retards setting. I do not have 2 set- 
ting hens in 5 all summer. My fowls 
moult quickly and often lay during 
moult. Some hens lay while raising 
their brood. Roosters keep PRIME 
and broilers grow big and fat. 

My "OCULUM" takes the place of 
ALL TONICS AND REMEDIES, and 
has spread to 5 continents. Journals, 
Experiment Stations and Fanciers 
praise it. This Journal O. K's it. 

Bradley Bros., Lee, Mass. of world 
wide fame say, "OCULUM" has NO 
EQUAL." xhey have used it for 10 
years. 

The Baltimore Sun says "OCU- 
LUM" is a wonderful remedy and 
highly recommended." 

H. C. Miller, Judge A. r. Assn, 
Akron, O. says, "OCULUM" made 48 
hens jump from 8 to 42 eggs a day." 

It is cheap and harmless. Feed only 
one drop a day per hen in the feed. 
When fowl is sick, you inject it. 

Sample xOc, Bottles 50c and $1, 
postpaid. Booklet free. 
The "OCULUM Co., Salem, Va. Box S 

Dealers handle — Guaranteed — 
Agents Wanted. 




Poultry Leg Bands 

THE "BEST YET" ALUMINUM. 
Not colored. Will stay on. 12.20c; 
25. 30c: 50. 60c; 100, 90c. State 
breed. 

CELLULOID SPIRAL BANDS. 
Red, Green, Amber, Pink, Black, 
White, Yellow. Purple. Light Blue. 
Dark Blue, Ruby, Cerise. 



Size/or 


12 


25 


50 


100 


250 


500 


Baby Chicks, Pigeons 


..$.10 


S.20 


$.35 


? .60 


S1.25 


S2.25 






30. 


.40 


.75 


1.75 


3.00 


Leghorns, Anconas . 


. .20 


.35 


.50 


.90 


2.00 


3.50 


Rocks. Reds. etc. . . 


.20 


.40 


.60 


1.00 


2.25 


4.00 


Asiatics . . . 


.25 


.45 


.75 


1.20 


2.75 


5.00 


Turkeys, Geese. - . 


.30 


.50 


.85 


1.40 


3.25 


6.00 


Aluminum Marker 


Work. 


Dept. 13 Beaver Fails, Pa. 



LADY PUEITAS 




HALF PRICES 
on Eggs and Chicks 

FROM 

Puritas Springs 
World's Greatest 

S. G. White Leghorns 



LADY LAYER 



Laid 326 Eggs in One 
Year 



Trapnested for over 10 years without missing one day. Every nest on our 

farm is a trapnest. On and after May 15th Eggs from Puritas Springs wonderful layers will be 
half price. On and after June 1st, Chicks from Puritas Springs wonderful layers will be half price. 

Now Is Your Chance to Get Eggs and Chicks at Half Price 
FROM THE WORLD'S GREATEST LAYERS 

We could not supply the demand for Eggs and Chicks for March and April 

delivery. The demand for Puritas Spring Chicks, Eggs and Stock has been greater this year than 
ever before. If you could come and see our Breeding Stock you sure would want some of their off- 
spring. June and July Chicks will be laying before Christmas if you give them special care. Send 
for our reduced price list on Eggs and Baby Chicks. Please mention if you have our 1922 Instructive 
Catalog. If you do not care to raise Baby Chicks, get 8 to 12 weeks old Pullets. We have a 
grand lot of them. Get our 8 to 12 weeks old Cockerels. It is the best way to introduce new blood. 

SCHENK. Owner-Mgr. 
of Berea, Ohio 



Puritas Springs Poultry Farm, Box P-111, Avon Lake, Ohio|;4 e s r ?y 



Page Number 12 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



How to Grow Big 
Husky Chicks 

EVERYBODY interested in sav- 
ing every chick, growing husky 
stock, and enjoying biggest 
poultry profits, may have a copy of 
this new free 9 6-page book, "Dol- 
lars and Sense in the Poultry Busi- 
n e s s,' written 
by Prof. T. E. 
Q u i s e nberry, 
one of Ameri- 
2 a ' s foremost 
authorities o n 
hatching, feed- 
ing and brood- 
i n g problems. 
It points the 
way to your 
success with 
chicks, and 
among other 
things, out- 
lines: 

How to Prevent Bowel Trouble 
and White Diarrhea. 

How to Grow Chicks and Save 
Feed. 

How to Prevent Chick Lice and 
Mites. 

How to Develop Chicks to Early 
Layers. 

How, When and What to Feed. 
How to Grow Chicks for Market. 
How to Brood Chicks Correctly. 
How to Prevent Summer Com- 
plaint. 

Write xoday. A post card will 
do, but send at once for this valu- 
able FREE BOOK before all are 
gone. They are going fast and are 
arousing tremendous interest every- 
where. Send to American Poultry 
School, Dept. 4016, Kansas City, Mo. 




CHICKS WITH "PEP" 

Our bred-to lay and exhibition 
chicks will pay you. Try them 
and be convinced. Kocks, Beds, 
Leghorns, Orpingtons, Wyan- 
dottes, Anconas, Minorcas. 
Sale delivery guaranteed. Pre- 
paid. Prices right. Free catalog. 
HOLGATE CHICK HATCHERY 
Box K, Holgate, Ohio 





FOOD 



Catch tray A, collects 
waste and returns it 
when inverted to close 
hopper against rats and 
mice at night. (See dot- 
ted lines). If your deal- 
er can not supply you send for circular and 
order direct. 

M. E. JACOBUS. Box 5-K. Eidgefield, N. J. 



throughout the south and especially 
the state of Georgia and his many 
friends will wish him much success 
in his new position. 

Word just reaches us that Frank 
H. Clement died at Palm Beach, 
Florida, February 18th. Captain 
Clement was an ardent supported of 
poultry in general but especially the 
Cornish Club and will be greatly 
missed. * * * 

Mr. D. A. Milmot has purchased 
the Star-Light Farm, located about 
two miles north of Elyria, Ohio and 
in the future this farm will be known 
as Wilmot's White Leghorn Farm. 

The "Chanticleer" did not appear 
at the Boston Show or Madison 
SQuare Garden. Can someone tell 
us WHY this breed is allowed in our 
standard of Perfection? Is not the 
Rhode Island White a more deserving 
breed? 

In Westfield, Massachusetts they 
have a poultry club of boys who are 
learning poultry keeping and hope to 
become full fledged poultrymen when 
they grow older. 

Wisconsin is right up and coming 
in the poultry game. This state has 
between 11,000,000 and 12,000,000 
chickens on the farms and this 
speaks well for the interest through- 
out the state. Let other states watch 
Wisconsin. 

Plan to visit the Illinois State Fair 
this coming fall and enter a few 
birds if you can do so. Don't let 
Wisconsin get all the enthusiasm. 
Fair will be held September 16 to 23. 

Walter C. Young, Dayton, Ohio, 
has gone into the poultry supply bus- 
iness. We have no doubt that he will 
build up a worthwhile business. 

Clarence C. DuPuy, founder and 
for many years publisher of the 
American Poultry Advocate has 
passed away. We regret the passing 
of this kindly man for we always 
felt indebted for many good ideas 
which we obtained from his paper 
years ago. Behold, how swiftly the 
sands run, and how rapidly our lives 
are drawing to a close. 

Governor J. A. O. Preus of Min- 
nesota set aside the week of March 
13 to 16 as Standardbred Poultry 
Week. This will lend much encour- 
agement to poultrymen and it would 
be an excellent idea if other execu- 
tives would follow this plan. 



Funk's 



INTERNATIONAL 
STRAIN 



S. C. W. Leghorns 



Bred 15 years for extreme high egg production. 2 5 per cent re- 
duction on hatching eggs, baby chicks for May and June deliveries. 
$26.00 per 100 for chicks, $22.50 per 100 in lots of 500, $20.00 per 
100 in lots of 1000. $11.00 per 100 for hatching eggs, $10.00 per 100 
in lots of 500 or over. Orders booked now. Safe arrival of chicks 
and eggs guaranteed. 

FUNK EGG FARM 



LYLE W. FUNK, Sole Owner, 



Box 500, 



BLOOMINGTON, ILL. 



KILL THEM ALL 

Every Rat and Mouse easily des- 
troyed by New Discovery 
Not a Poison 

Absolute freedom from rats and mice is now 
assured everyone. No more trapping and pois- 
oning just a few. Clean out the whole hunch, 
• ►Id. young", big and little. 




Hick's Rat Killer kills every rat or mouse 
on your place. Most wonderful of all it does 
not ' harm anything but rats, mice, gophers, 
and other rodents. It is harmless to children, 
pets, poultry and all kinds of stock. It can 
be spread anywhere and wiU kill only rats 
and mice. This death bringing disease rapidly 
spreads and quickly destroys all the rats and 
mice. There is no smell or odor for they run 
outside for water and die away from the 
building. 

A Trial Costs You Nothing 

Mr. Hick is offering everyone troubled with 
these pests .the chance to get rid of them 
at no cost to themselves. He will send tliree 
large double strength, one dollar bottles for 
the price of one. You. keep one for yourself: 
the other two you sell to your neighbors at 
one dollar each, thus getting your own free 
and in addition making a dollar profit. Send 
S1.00 todav (currency, money order, check, 
etc.) to Chas. M. Hick & Co., Dept 1304. 
1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, HI. If you 
prefer, send no money, just your name and 
address and pay postman $1.00 and postage 
on delivery. If after two weeks trial you 
are not absolutely satisfied, write Mr. Hick 
and your money will be refunded. 



LEE'S LICE KILLER 

Kills lice, mites, bed bugs. etc.. affecting poultry. Spray or 
paint on roosts, etc. Gets body fice on chickens, too. WirUs 
while they sleep. No dusting, dipping, greasing or handling. 
Saves lot of unpleasant work. At most towns,, at stores ivuidhng 
Lee Poultry Supplies. Write for information and h RE.- Hiics. 
«?EO. H. LEE CO., Dept. P2C OMAHA, HEBR. 



Chick Bands 

latest, best, can't 
cut legs, green, yel- 
low, black, white, 
red, blue, 100-95e, 
Adult spirals 100-95C 
LIBEETT BAND CO., 




Box E, Belleville, 111. 



When taxation becomes a burden, 
it becomes a menace. 

We have learned of the marriage 
of Thos. F. Rigg, president of the 
American Poultry Association and 
Mrs. E. B. Campbell, secretary of the 
same Association. We wish them 
many years of married bliss. 

# * # 

Mr. John I. Wyant, of Altoona, 
Pennsylvania has been appointed 
state secretary of the Rhode Island 
Red Club and is going to re-organize 
the membership of the state. If you 
breed Rhode Island Reds and live in 
Pennsylvania, get in touch with Mr. 
Wyant. 

The Rhode Island Red Club of 
America starts a membership contest 
May 15th. This Club is certainly 
very much awake and should be an 
inspiration to other such Clubs. 

We believe in capital punishment 
for mongrel and useless roosters. 
Do you? 



Every dead ear of corn means 900 
stalks missing from the field. Test 
seed. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 13 



Royal Strain 



BUFF ORPINGTONS 

15 hens and 3 cockerels for sale. Hens 3 
and 5 dollars, cockerels 5 and 10 dollars. 
Eggs half price, 75c, $1.50, $2.50 per 15. 
Order from this ad. 

K. W. HUEHNE 
211 South 10th St. Quincy, Illinois 



free-Co/iAeifs Poultry Book 



SO pages chock full of information about the feeding and 
rearing of chicks, culling of hens, etc. Tells how to keep 
chickens healthy and how to make them pay. Whether 
a beginner or a professional. Conkey's Book i* worth 
dollars to you. Sent for 6 cents in ctampF to pay postage. 
THE C E. CONKEY CO. 6542 Broadway, Cleveland. Obio 



Get Prices on Old Trusty 
Incubators and Brooders. 

Nearly a million in use. Quick 
shipment Low prices. Free 
catalog to any address on re- 
quest. M.M.JOHNSON CO. 
Clay Center, Nebraska 




Shipment | Freight 



HEMSTITCHING 



attach- 
on any 

sewing machine, easily adjusted. Price $2.50 
with full instructions. 

ORIENTAL NOVELTY CO., 
Box 11, Corpus Christi, Texas 



Oat Sprouter $2.49 

For $2.49, including heater, you can make the 
best oat sprouter on earth. Plans for building, 10c 
I. PUTNAM Route 524-0 ELMIRA, N. Y. 

SKIMMILK, GREENFEEDS WILL 
SAVE BABY CHICKS 



By the use of skimmilk or butter- 
milk and an abundance of green feed 
many of the troubles affecting young 
chicks may be prevented, according 
to D. C. Kennard, poultrynian at the 
Ohio Experiment Station. 

Giving the chicks a good ration 
with all the skimmilk or buttermilk 
they will drink during the first six 
or eight weeks is regarded to be the 
most effective treatment for white 
diarrhea. 

The feeding of skimmilk or butter- 
milk is also a good treatment for 
cocidiosis, a highly contagious dis- 
ease, which may break out when the 
chicks are from four to eight weeks 
of age. With this disease the chicks 
usually become droopy and listless. 

For leg weakness an abundance of 
finely-cut succulent green feed with 
plenty of exercise is helpful. 

Intestinal worms, which are re- 
sponsible for many immature and in- 
ferior pullets in the flock, may be 
eradictated by feeding two pounds of 
tobacco dust in each 100 pounds of 
dry mash. The medicated mash is 
fed for four weeks. 



KEEP YOUR POULTRY HEALTHY 

During the lifetime of the average 
person experiences become varied, in- 
creasing wisdom and confidence in 
proportion to the interest we take 
in the things we come in contact 
with. That is particularly true with 
the poultry business. The one great 
problem confronting the poultryman 
today is How can I keep my poultry 
healthy? The common poultry di- 
seases are Cholera, Roup, Diphther- 
ia, White Diarrhea in chicks, etc., 
etc. 

This same life experience enables 
one to become familiar with the ac- 
tion of certain medicines for poul- 
try — iron for the blood, digitalis for 
the heart, strychnine for the nerves 
and capsicum to stimulate digestion. 

These medicines to do their work 



most effectively must be properly 
proportioned, carefully and scientific- 
ally compounded, in order to obtain 
the best results when administered 
to poultry afflicted with any of these 
common diseases. It is safest to rely 
upon the highest authority in mat- 
ters involving such great conse- 
quences. 

Dr. David Roberts, President of 
the Dr. David Roberts Veterinary 
Co., a graduate veterinarian of Wau- 
kesha, Wisconsin, spent a number of 
years studying the action of veteri- 
nary medicines and the nature of 
animal diseases, including poultry. 
He has had more than a quarter of 
a century's experience in the actual 
breeding and the handling of do- 
mestic animals and poultry and in 
treating their ailments. 

The Dr. David Roberts Veterinary 
Co. put out a full line of poultry 
preperations, including one of great 
merit for white diarrhea in chicks. 
This remedy has been tried, tested 
and recommended by the highest 
poultry authorities as a preventative 
and a successful treatment for white 
diarrhea. 

A Live Stock and Poultry Bureau 
is maintained by this Company for 
free information and advice. It lies 
within the power of every poultry 
raiser in America to prevent and 
overcome to a very great extent the 
poultry diseases that are now costing 
the breeders of the United States 
millions of dollars annually. 

A special introductory offer is 
announced in their advertisement on 
another page, relating to their Poul- 
try Tablets. This is done in order 
that a thorough test of those who 
are not familiar with the merits of 
these tablets be given. It is a pre- 
vention of white diarrhea in chicks. 
When writing them mention this pa- 
per. Our readers should avail them- 
selves of this opportunity of secur- 
ing a trial package at the announced 
reduced price. 



Science Discovers 
Greatest Lice Killer 

Changes Old Methods. No Dusting or Spraying. 
Birds Delouse Themselves. Gives Lasting Relief. 

A recent discovery promises to revolutionize 
all the methods accepted up to now for keep- 
ing poultry free from lice and mites. This 
wonderful lice killer keeps the birds always 
lice fiee without the poultry raiser doing any 
work. It is the simplest, easiest, surest and 
best method ever discovered. 




Hick's Lice Kill, which is the name of this 
sensational lice killer, is added to the drink- 
ing water. The medicine taken into the sys- 
tem of the bird comes out through the pores 
and every louse or mite dies or leaves the 
body. It does not injure the hatehability or 
flavor of the eggs or meat ; is harmless to 
chicks and does not affect the plumage. A 
few days treatment at the start and then a 
little in the drinking water each month. 

A Trial Costs You Nothing 

So confident is Sir. Hicks that Hick's Lice 
Kill will kill every louse or mite, that he is 
making a special guaranteed offer of two 
regular full sized, double strength, $1.00 bot- 
tles and a regular $1.00 package of Hick's 
Egg-Lay Tablets all for $1.00. Use one bot- 
tle yourself and sell the other at one dollar, 
thus getting your own free. Send $1.00 today 
(currency, monev order, check, etc) to Ghas. 
M. Hick & Co., Dept. 374, 1018 S. Wabash 
Ave., Chicago, III. If you prefer, send no 
money just your name and address, and pay 
postman $1.00 and postage on delivery. If 
after two weeks trial you are not absolutely 
satisfied, write Mr. Hick and your money will 
be refunded. 



STORMONT'S BARRED ROCKS 
— DEFEAT ALL BREEDS 

in First Illinois Laying Contest, by winning 
first pen, first, third and fifth highest layers. 
These facts speak volumes for my strain. Write 
for mating list. 

Rev. A. C. Stormont, Auxvasse, Mo. 




W. G. MERADITH, 



MEAT PLUS EGGS 



That is what you get when you breed from 

Meradith Bred 

Heavy Laying Barred Rocks. 

Individuals of this strain have reached 11 H 
lbs. for hens, and have record of 325 eggs in 
one year. Selected eggs from heavy laying, 
well marked, large, vigorous breeders, 15, 
$2.50; 30, $4.50; 50, $0.00; 100. $10.00. Eggs 
from specially selected pens, 15, $4.00; 30, 
$7.00. Also choice breeding stock for sale. 

Box K, 




Danvers, Illinois 



BEST 



FOR BABY CHICK: 
b "American Pans" 




PANS 

Postpaid 



$2-50 



small holes in the top pan prevent the chicks t^^^J^i^^pr^t them * ™» y «™g{;« 



too close around the feeder and prevent dirt and droppings from polluting the contents ~A:~,~ »,„,„ r«5 

i n the construction of these pans to become bose or broken-they overcome every objection to the ordinary Ma^on Jar 
^S^S^SMdSE&S of all feeding and watering SW 0 ^ th ^,^i,^ an , ffico %LL 
AMERICAN POULTRY JOURNAL, 137 PETERSON BUIjLOI?. Gr, CHICAGO. ILL. 
World s Oldest. Largest and Best Poultry Paper, 1 year /5c: 2 yrs. % l.O' 0, 5 yrs 
or $1.00 Buys 3 Pans and American Poultry Journal Four Months. 



$2.00 



Page Number 14 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



The Cause of White Diarrhea 

White Diarrhea is caused by the ba- 
cillus Bacterium Pullorum transmit- 
ted through the yolk. There is scarce- 
ly a hatch without some infected 
chicks. The germs multiply very rap- 
idly and one infected chick may in- 
fect the entire brood. The germs can 
be killed by the use of preventives. 
Intestinal Antiseptics to kill the 
germs should be given as soon as the 
chicks are out of the shell. It is 
much easier to prevent than it is to 
cure. 



How to Prevent White Diarrhea 

Dear Sir: I have raised poultry for 
years and have lost my share of little 
chicks from White Diarrhea. Finally 
I learned of Walker's Walko Remedy 
for this disease, so sent for two 50c 
packages to the Walker Remedy Co., 
Dept. 27 6, Waterloo, Iowa. I raised 
over 500 chicks and never lost a sing- 
le one from White Diarrhea. Walko 
not only prevents White Diarrhea, 
but it gives the chicks strength and 
vigor — they develop quicker and 
feather earlier. I have found this 
company thoroughly reliable and al- 
ways get the remedy by return mail. 
Mrs. L. L. Tam, Burnetts Creek, Ind. 



Don't Wait 

Don't wait until White Diarrhea gets half or 
two-thirds your chicks. Don't let it get started. 
Be prepared. Write today. Let us prove to you 
that Walko will prevent White Diarrhea. Send 
50c for box on our guarantee — money back if 

not satisfied. Walker Remedy Co., Dept. 
376, Waterloo, la. 

SUPERIOR LEG BANDS 




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Also, colored number bands. Baby 
chick bands. State breed and sex. Postpaid. Cat. free: 
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Light Brahma 

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strain. S3. 00 per 15. I am sure they will 
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MRS. E. SEACOY 



33 Bluff Ave., 



Brainerd, Minn. 



I 



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DesMcmesrncubatorCe.5GS3d5t.DesMaines 




ILLINOIS POULTRY AND EGG 
SHIPPERS' ASSOCIATION 



Address before the Illinois Poultry 
and Egg Shipper's Association, 
March 3rd. 1922., By C. jr. Scott, 
Chief Poultryman. 
It is with pleasure I come before 

you this afternoon to give you a 

talk on the subject: 

Poultry Husbandry in the State of 

Illinois under the management of 

the State Board of Agriculture, B. 

M. Davison, Director. 

This department was established 

through the efforts of the State 

Poultry Association, after many 

years. 

Until last July, Illinois ranked the 
3 6th state in the Union in giving 
assistance to the $85,000,. uO indus- 
try. Our state has a population of 
2u, 000, 000 hens and grows 30,000,- 
000 chickens a year. 

It ranks second in the United 
States in poultry production, and 
Poultry Husbandry work in Illinois 
affords a big field of opportunity. 

In Governor Small, the pouitrymen 
found a real friend. He is the first 
governor we have had who has recog- 
nized the possibility of developing a 
poultry husbandry department, and 
B. M. Davison, Director of Agricul- 
ture, who is striving to improve all 
farm conditions, to add greater 
wealth to Illinois, was willing to 
father the cause, and it is functioned 
today under his department. 

Many friends of poultry in the 
legislature, appreciating the magni- 
tude of the work in this field, made 
an appropriation to carry on the ex- 
perimental work of two egg-laying 
contests, one of which is located at 
Murphysboro, 111., and the other at 
Quincy. 

At each station, we have an expert 
poultryman as station manager, and 
one helper. At Murphysboro, we 
have 70 pens, at Quincy, we have 
114 pens. Each pen consists of five 
pullets, making a total of 92 0 pullets 
at both contests. They are entered 
at the contest for one year, starting 
November 1, 1921, the year closing 
October 31, 1922. 

Only Standard bred poultry is ad- 
mitted, for it has been proved that 
if constitutional vigor, stamina, and 
size, were to be maintained in the 
useful breeds, which liberally con- 
tribute to the egg basket, and the 
market as well, the methods of 



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Standard breeding could not be ig- 
nored. 

We are encouraging the economic 
qualities by selective breeding, and 
the utility breeder must closely study 
the points of excellence which, dis- 
tinguish and characterize the breeds 
of our standard. 

Nothing is more beautiful to look 
upon, or adds to the attractiveness of 
a farm flock, then many of our stand- 
ard bred varieties. Assorted sizes 
and colors of mixed breed mongrels 
are a "waste of time. A heavy layer 
is a good hen to own, and if pure 
bred of some standard variety, her 
prepotency may be established with 
improvements from year to year. 

There are exceptional layers, de- 
pendable profit payers, in practically 
every standard breed. A little ob- 
servation with intelligent culling, 
will increase the production and 
quality in our farm flocks 100 per 
cent. 

Poultry today, is known to be one 
of the big factors of farm products. 

Determining what are the best 
methods to pursue along constructive 
work is the purpose of the Depart- 
ment of Poultry Husbandry, recently 
established in this state. 

The need for planning and count- 
ing the cost of poultry products re- 
quires the analysis of an expert, and 
there are many angles diverging 
from a common center, which will 
take a lot of hard work, as well as 
united co-operation, to solve. It is 
our intention to treat the problem 
as a whole, rather than run off on a 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 15 



single track and dear with one phase 
only. 

Every farm and even the small 
back yard poultrymen presents con- 
ditions and opportunities, which our 
department expects to assist as far 
as possible with the means we have. 

If in time, we can be the means 
of securing better poultry, and pro- 
ducing a fowl that measures up to 
all the demands of the consumer, 
that carries a uniform grade quality, 
that has a mark of distinction wher- 
ever sold, we will cut out a great 
waste, and show an increased profit 
for the producer. We are not ex- 
pecting to attain all the ideals we 
have in mind in a few short years, 
but each year, hope to make ad- 
vancement. 

Now, the analysis of the field, as 
I see it, is about as follows: 

Make poultry more profitable to 
the producer by better productive 
methods. 

Establish Standard bred poultry in 
every flock. The laws of supply and 
demand require the studying of mar- 
ket conditions, the knowledge of 
grading, and the proper feeding for 
the market, that, when they arrive, 
they may top the market in price. 

The brooding and rearing of 
chicks, sanitary housing. 

The knowledge of being able to 
cull out the drones at all seasons of 
the year. 

There is a great waste in the hand- 
ling of eggs by the producer. Eggs 
should be graded before sent to the 
market. 

Infertile eggs should be produced 
during the hot summer months, 
should be gathered daily, and placed 
in clean containers in a temperature 
of about 40 degrees until marketed. 
Grading the eggs for storage could 
be practised by all producers. Only 
the dealers who handle the eggs 
when received can tell the per cent 
of the enormous loss. This, of 
course, is charged by the dealer to 
overhead expense, and is paid by the 
producer or consumer. If these care- 
less methods were carefully guarded 
and watched, the loss would be di- 
minished, and he would receive an 
increased price for his product. 

Haphazard methods in caring for 
stock, chicks, eggs, etc. are result- 
ing in a large annual loss to the 
farmer. 

" After the breeding season, all male 
birds should be taken from the flock 

Sick Baby Chicks? 

Germozone operates just as these people say. 
It is preventive as well as curative, and satis- 
faction is absolutely guaranteed. Twenty years 
on the market. Sold by drug and seed stores 
at most towns. 

Wm. B. Shepherd, Scranton, Pa., wrote: "Two 
weeks after we started last spring we were a 
mighty discouraged pair. Every day from three 
to six chicks dead. A neighbor put us next to 
Germozone and we are now sure if we had had 
it at the start we would not have lost a single 
chick." Ralph Wurst, Erie, Pa., — "Not a case 
of white diarrhoea in three years." C. O. Pe- 
train, Moline, HI. — "I never had a sick chick 
all last season." Mrs. Wm. Christiana, Olive 
Ridge, N. Y. — "Have 800 chicks now 5 weeks 
old and not a single case of bowel trouble." 
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Geo. H. Lee Co., Dept. p-20 Omaha, Neb. 



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Louse Pest 

IT means better fowls, more eggs, better 
growth in chicks . Chicks are com ing along 
now. Don't let them be pestered to death. 
Sprinkle Dr. Hess Instant Louse Killer in 
the feathers, in the nests, on roosts, about 
pens, coops and yards. Be sure to keep it 
in the dust bath all the year 'round. That 
means louse prevention. When setting the 
hen sprinkle it in the bottom of the nest 
before adding the litter and the eggs. Then 
your brood will come off free from lice. 

An excellent bug killer to use on cucum- 
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LOUSE KILLER 



of laying hens. Only infertile eggs 
should be produced; yet, it is more 
common than otherwise, that males 
are permitted to run with flocks the 
year round. 

Capons are very profitable, and 
can be marketed any time between 
December 1st and March 1st, at a 
good price. A capon is a desexed 
male, the operation being performed 
when they weigh two and one-half 
pounds. No particular attention 
other than good care, such as is 
given the flock in general, is necess- 
ary. They grow faster than the 
average male. As they mature, they 
take on a feminine appearance, and 
have a very docile disposition, are 
quiet and a little sluggish; easy to 
keep within bounds, do not crow. 
The comb and wattles cease to grow, 
which causes the head to appear 
small. The hackle and back feath- 
ers develop beautifully. 

The demand for capons is most 
appreciated in large cities where they 
command a good price. There is al- 
ways a ready market for them. The 
quality of the meat, when roasted, 
is superior to that of the ordinary 
fowl. 

The larger breeds are best for this 
purpose. 

In conclusion, I might state that 
our egg-laying contests are open to 
the world, but if proper interest were 
taken by the breeders of poultry, all 
our pens would be filled by Illinois 
breeders. Each female is trap-nested 
daily, and her entire record is avail- 
able at all times. Feed is weighed 
carefully. Temperature is taken 
daily. Moult periods are noted. At 
the end of the year, a summary re- 
port will be issued in bulletin form, 
which will be available to anyone 
interested. Records are being made, 
and a great educational work is be- 
ing carried out. 



Baby Chicks 

20 Leading Varieties 

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Customers report pullets laying at 
FOUR MONTHS. 5 0,000 CHICKS 
weekly, 19 th Season. Catalog Free. 

MILLER POULTRY FARM, 
Box 668, Lancaster, Mo. 



Spraying Guide 



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Barred Rock 

Baby Chicks 

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I make a specialty of Barred Rock chicks and 
I can guarantee my customers that they will 
be more than satisfied If they order chlx from 
me, as I keep nothing but the choicest of 
birds in my flocks, and they are culled each 
year for high egg production. Every customer 
ordering from me must be satisfied or money 
Tv-ill be cheerfully refunded. Barred Rock 
chicks $16.50 per hundred. 

FRED YUNKER, Dakota, niinois 



Page Number 16 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



LICE? 



With their scissor-like jaws they bite constantly 
—thousands of them at one time— irritating the 
fowl almost beyond endurance, robbing it of blood 
and rest, cutting down its vitality and rendering 
it an easy prey to disease. No wonder lousy chick- 
ens never do well for themselves or their owner. 
When a fowl seems restless and picks at itself, 
look for lice. 

Go After Lice Quickly 

with Conkey's Lice Powder. It comes in a handy 
package with a sifter top, making it easy to dust 
the powder thoroughly into the feathers. Body 
lice don't like it — help to keep your flock free by 
occasional dusting. 

Conkey'9 Lice Liquid helps to rid your fowls 
and houses of mites. For painting roosts, fit- 
tings, nest boxes and wherever mites congregate. 
We guarantee it to satisfy you. 
Conkey's Lice Fix is an ointment— a new and 
very effective way of fighting body 
lice. 

Conkey's Head Lice Ointment 

helps to overcome the head lice 
that "eat up" baby chicks. 
Insist on Conkey's. If your dealer cannot 
supply you, write as. Send 6c in stamps 
for Conkey's Big Poultry Book. 

The G. E. Conkey Co. 
6542 Broadway Cleveland, Ohio 

(75) 





Reliable Standard 

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Hatched fiom pure bred se- 
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WECKEL BROS., Box 391K, Moline, Illinois 




ARE RHODE ISLAND WHITES 
WORTHY OF A PLACE IN 
THE STANDARD? 

(Continued from Page 5) 

Whites are oblong, shaped like a 
brick. That they have type was 
clearly demonstrated at the recent 
Boston and Madison Square Garden 
shows at which many doubters were 
convinced that the Rhode Island 
Whites really have the Rhode Island 
type. The Whites are a pound light- 
er in weight than the Rocks, and are 
a different shape. Compare the Reds, 
and the Rocks in the Standard. And 
the Whites have the same type as 
the Reds. Of course, unscrupulous 
persons might substitute a White 
Rock for a single comb Rhode Island 
White; in fact, there are other breeds 
that might be substituted for each 
other, also, and they are Standard. 
So why keep the single comb Rhode 
Island Whites out of the Stadard for 
tnat reason. 

Another writer asks the question 
"Why have Rhode Island Whites 
when we have R. I. Reds for type and 
the Wyandottes and Rocks for 
color?" That same question could 
have been asked when the White 
Rocks were admitted, for we already 
had the Barred Rocks. But someone 
wanted the Rock type, but not the 
barred effect — the result was White 
Rocks. So it is with the Rhode 
Island Whites. We like the Rhode 
Island type — it is the business type 
— but do not like the color, red, so 
have selected the R. I. Whites. And 
can we not make the choice without 
being told to take some other variety 
or breed. If there is ever a variety 
called the R. I. Blacks or Blues, as 
some fear there will be if the Whites 
are made Standard, and they become 
popular, and have type, they should 
be admitted. Any new variety that 
has distinct type or color and is popu- 
lar should be admitted to Standard 
if it meets the A. P. A. requirements. 

I cannot understand why such op- 
position should exist against the R. 
I. Whites. Unless some breeders of 
the White Rocks and Wyandottes, 
remembering how popular the Reds 
became, are afraid the R. I. Whites 
might do the same to their disad- 
vantage. What they look for is fair 
competition, they say. So do we. 
Rhode Island Whites have been bred 
several years and have not injured 
the White Rocks. And I do not 
think that if they are admitted to the 



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3 



BUCKEYE MAMMOTHS 



THE BUSINESS 
INCUBATORS 

Remarkable success 
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again showing their 
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hatched chicks. 




The Buckeye Incubator 

715 Euclid Avenue 



WRITE FOR YOUR 
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As the demand has 
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Company 

Springfield, Ohio 



Standard they will put the White 
Rocks out of business — neither will 
the Rhode Island Whites be put out 
of business if they are turned down. 
Every show of any consequence has 
a class for them, and that their popu- 
larity is spreading is manifested in 
several ways, one of which is the in- 
creased entries at the shows, and 
another is by the growth of the R. I. 
White Club — the specialty club that 
is boosting the Whites. And, I un- 
derstand that a similar club is be- 
ing formed in England. Anyone 
doubting that the breeders are active 
or wishing more information on this 
popular variety, should write Mrs. E. 
Alphonso, Union, Mo. A copy of the 
1922 year book just published can 
be had for the small sum of 25c. 

As previously stated, it is the 
small fancier or "backlotter" that is 
the real factor, and determines 
whether a breed is to be popular. 
R. I. Whites are specially adapted to 
meet the needs of the small breeders, 
and give wonderful results under all 
conditions. I am constantly receiv- 
ing reports from this class, and give 
one below that just came in. Note 
that these chickens were raised in a 
small wire enclosure, moved around 
the lawn, and at present are kept in 
a four by six coop, probably without 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 17 



ventilation, etc., and are not given 
any special care. The writer admits 
he knows little about chickens. The 
person making this report lives in 
Warrensburg, N. Y., in the Adiron- 
dack Mts., a section of extreme cold 
and continuous snow. Chickens have 
to have Quality to make a record like 
this in that section. 

"It is an old saying that "one good 
turn deserves another" and it is in 
keeping with this that I now en- 
deavor to give you some kind of a 
report on the R. I. Whites which I 
purchased from you last April. 

"The forty-two day old chicks ar- 
rived in good condition. Three were 
killed by the chicks crowding in the 
first two or three days. One pullet 
at the age of six months, ruptured 
the egg duct and one cockerel died 
shortly afterward from an unknown 
cause. That was all the birds I lost. 

"I got my first egg Sept. 14, when 
the birds were five months and four 
days old. They skipped the next day 
and have missed but one since (Nov. 
11). In September I got 25 eggs, in 
October 102, in November lz4, and 
in December 177. During the five 
days of this month I have received 
29 eggs. At that rate they will lay 
180 eggs this month (January). 

"Cornell states that good pullets 
should lay 6 eggs each during De- 
cember. My fourteen pullets have 
averaged 12 9-14 for that time. In 
the figures which I give later I have 
valued the eggs at the lowest price 
the stores here have charged (and 
they were not strictly fresh either.) 

"I sold no broilers but at the age 
of four and a half month my cock- 
erels brought me $1.65 each. They 
weighed five and a half pounds each 
and brought thirty cents a pound. 
The buyer came and got them so I 
was put to no trouble. The birds 
we have used I have valued around 
twenty cents a pound so you see I 
have given them no benefit of the 
doubt. 

"Of the original forty-two five 
have died. I have sold or used 21, 
and have fourteen pullets and two 
cockerels left. They never have been 
sick nor have they ever been lousy. 
They grew so fast that they were 
crowded before I got my hen house 
built and ready for them. I am not 
using lights and they have in no way 
been forced. Experienced poultry 
raisers who have seen them have 
pronounced them second to none. 

"At the end of the year they stood 
me as follows: 

Value of eggs $25.33 

Value of birds sold 

and used 30.50 



Total income 

Original cost of birds $20.00 
Cost of grain, etc 28.75 



Total expense 



$55.88 



48.75 



Net profits $ 7.13 

"You will note that they paid me 
back what I paid for them, paid their 
keep and left me a net profit of $7.13 
to say nothing of the value of the 
sixteen birds I still have. 

"I have 30 lbs. of G-. L. F. grain 
on hand which I did not charge 
against them as I did not open it un- 
till Jaunary 2. That cost me $7.34 
but as there was about forty pounds 




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POULTRY TRIBUNE 

Dept. A, Mount Morris, 111. 

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(1) full year and send me absolutely free a copy of "How and What To Feed 
Poultry." It is understood that if I am not satisfied at the end of three (3) 
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Name 

Address 

Town. State. •• 



Page Number 18 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



of the old grain in the bin at the 
time I opened the new you will see 
that I have my birds and the grain 
on hand and am still even up on the 
cash end of it. 

"I think the record my birds have 
made is one to be proud of and I 
freely admit that I know very little 
about chickens. They had to have 
quality in them to make their record. 

"The investment I made with you 
will never be regretted and if you 
find any "Doubting Thomases" 
among your customers you have my 
permission to refer them to me and 
I will set them right. 

I will add that this report was un- 
solicited and is from a customer of 
a friend of mine. This is the usual 
stunt of the Whites and once kept 
they are a fixture, whether it be on 
a commercial farm or a "backlot". 
And fair minded persons can see they 
are profitable: for the market from 
their description — for eggs from 
their record at the laying contests 
and for the fancier because of their 
beauty. And as they have type is 
there really any good reason why this 
profitable variety should not be ad- 
mitted to the Standard of Perfection. 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

(Continued from Page 9) 



We can see no reason why a plant 
where eggs are produced on a busi- 
ness basis, like any other product, 
should not be called an "egg fac- 
tory." We have seen this term used 
by others and we are willing to ad- 
mit that we have used it in many 
of our articles. We talk about "egg 
machines" and this is certainly in the 
same class with "egg factory." If 
you are wrong, then you will have 
plenty of company. But we feel you 
are perfectly right in this matter. 



Several readers of this Department 
asked for a personal reply and for- 
got to enclose the little red postage 
stamp. We wish we could write you 
without this but the number of let- 
ters we answer make it imperative 
that a stamp be inclosed. Really, it 
makes very cheap advice for you at 
that. Remember a stamp gets a per- 
sonal reply, otherwise the answer 
will appear in this Department. 



RICH BROTHERS 

HIGH GRADE S. C. WHITE LEGHORN 

Baby Chicks, $12 a 100 



u. 



June Delivery. Postage Paid. 

RICH BROTHERS, 
F. D. No. 2 Elkhart, Ind. 



You Can Cure 
Your Rupture 

Capt. Collings Will Send You 
Free His Plan by Which 
He Cured Himself. 

Thousands of ruptured men and women will 
rejoice to know that Capt. Collings who was 
helpless and bed-ridden for years with double 
rupture will send free to all the full plan by 
which he cured himself at home. 

Merely send your name and address to Capt. 
W. A. Collings, Inc., Box 5G1F, Watertown, X. 
Y. It won't cost you a cent and may be worth 
a fortune. Hundreds have already cured them- 
selves by just this free information. 




Test Your Eggs 



BEFORE 



you put them in the incubator or set them under hens. Let 
the Magic Egg Tester decide the strength of the egg to 
incubate. Test is both rapid and positive. A pair of eyes, 
no judgment, no light, no expense, and lasts a life-time. 
Advertised in Poulty Journals many years. Testimonials 
from poultrymen and chemists. $2.50 each. Insured Parcel Post sent same day order is 
received. Orders by telegraph dispatched C. O. D. Most valuable incubation methods 
with eoery Tester. This Tester is fully guaranteed as represented. Circular free. Read on: 

LAST CALL— LAST CHANCE 

for this season to secure ALL vitality chicks. HUSTLE your order to US if your dealer 
has none left. Enclose check or money order for $2.50. None sold on "trial" for a 
SHORTER TIME THAN ONE YEAR. Cost, (less 25 cents) refunded after trial. Very 
latest instructions for incubation. Complete bulletins with every Tester. 

Magic Egg Tester Works, Dept. E Buffalo, N. Y„ also Bridgeburg, Canada. 

Melrose Farm Reds 

Won 2nd place in Illinois Egg Laying Contest in February and with their winning records In the 
show rooms of Illinois and elsewhere should convince you, that we have what you want In 
Single Comb Rhode Island Reds. Eggs from the same blood lines as the winners at the 
Egg Laying Contest at §8.00 per 100. Order from this ad. 



JOE WELLMAN, 



R. R. 4, 



Quincy, Illinois 



Why Not Get REAL TOM BARRON Leghorn Chicks and Eggs 

from a firm that has imported direct each year since 1915, at prices but 
little higher than the Commercial Hatcheries charge for common stock. 
Chicks $15.00 per 100, $13.50 per 100 after June 1st. Eggs $8.00 per 100 
with free replacement for all non fertiles. . Orders filled promptly from this 
ad or send for descriptive list to 

COLEMAN MILES EGG FARM, Importers. Box N, Mt. Carroll, m. 

EGGS — S. C. White Leghorns and S. C. Rhode Island Reds — EGGS 

We arp offering hatching eggs from birds that have proven show winners last year and every one 
of which has a high egg laying record. "We are making attractive prices and will go the limit to 
see that vou get satisfactory service. Our mating list is free. 'Write for a copv at once. 
HIGHVIEW POULTRY FARM, A. J. Bauman, Prop. 628 Jackson St., Quincy. Illinois 



BALLARD'S SUPREME WHITE ROCKS 



Have mated some fine pens for the eg 
P. W. BALLARD, 



trade from my Champion winners. Hating list on request. 

GALESBURG, ILL. 



RAISE BIG BROILERS 



Add a extra pound to your broilers 
by using "OCULUM". It makes them 
grow fast and large. "OCULUM'.' 
users praise it. For 15 years it has 
given such genuine satisfaction that 
its reputation has spread to 5 con- 
tinents. It is cheap, only feed one 
drop a day to each fowl. 

Send 10c to the "OCULUM" Co., 
Salem, Va. and get a sample. We 
have carried the "OCULUM" ad for 
years and can assure you fair treat- 
ment. 



BABY 



LIGHT BRAHMAS 



Elsewhere in this issue will be 
found advertisement of eggs for 
hatching by Mrs. E. Seacoy, Brain- 
erd, Minn. Mrs. Seacoy's birds have 
been uniformity prize winners. At 
the Poultry Show at Brainerd, her 
Light Brahma Hen was placed as 
champion hen of the show, all breeds 
competing with 259 birds on exhibi- 
tion. This sweepstake hen was also 
prize hen at Duluth and Superior. In 
addition Mrs. Seacoy won first on 
pen and 1st and 2nd on cockerels. 
Her birds have also won at Minne- 
apolis and Milwaukee. She is offer- 
ing eggs for hatching at $3.00 per 
15. If you are interested in Light 
Brahmas we suggest that you look 
up her ad. 




From Great layers. Full-blooded slock. 

as ^ One o( Ihe Largest 
'^Sgl'^^ and Best Equipped 
Hatcheries in the 
WORLD. 

Over 50,000 Chii Weekly. 

Postpaid to your door, and 
guaranteed 95^ alive delivery. 
Customers report hens as laying 280 
eggs a year from our stock. 

Get our famous blood lines of 
Leghorns, Anconas, Rocks. Reds, 
Orpingtons, Wyandoltcs, 
Mlnorcas. 

Get our low prices first, before ordering. 
We save you money. 
Large instructive catalog free. 

FARR0W-BIRSB CO., PEORIA, ILL 




Poultry Leg Bands 

Colored Leader Adjustable, fit 

anything from bantam to goose, 
numbered consecutively, Red, Elue, 
Green, Yellow, Pin!:. 

100, $1.50; 50, $1.00; 25, 60c. 

Heavy Aluminum, numbered 
consecutively, large raised figures, 
millions have been sold, adjustable 
for any size bird, will stay on. 
100, 60c; 50. 35c; 25, 20c. 
Celluloid Spiral, 10 colors, 
Red, Green, Garnet, Black, 
White, Pink, Yellow, Purple, 
Light Blue and Dark Blue. 

25 60 100 250 600 
No. 1 Brahmas Giants etc.. .$.45 $.7S $1.20 J2.7S J5.00 

No. 2 Rocks, Reds, etc .40 .60 1.00 2.2S 4.00 

No. 3 Leghorns, Anconas, etc. . .35 .50 .90 2.00 3.50 
Prices are postpaid. State color and breed. 

Eureka Supply House Box K, Mount Morris, III. 




A piece of twine or fine wire will 
make a clean cut through a cake of 
laundry soap. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 19 



FEEDING DUCKLINGS 



We give our ducklings their first 
feed on the second day after hatch- 
ing, and this usually consists of stale 
bread soaked in sweet milk. Some- 
times we add hard-boiled, infertile 
eggs and chop them up fine. After 
a few days we add ground corn and 
oats with the coarse hulls sifted out, 
with a little middlings and wheat 
bran. After about ten days we be- 
gin to add a little good beef scrap. 
We feed five times a day for the 
first week or ten days, gradually 
dropping to four, then three, after 
they are well grown. By this time 
the beef scraps may be increased to 
ten per cent. We also add a little 
fine charcoal occasionally. 

We give plenty of water from the 
start in a fountain deep enough for 
the ducklings to get their heads in, 
but not so that they can wet their 
feathers. For green stuff we feed 
lettuce or cabbage leaves or any sim- 
ilar succulence that the ducklings 
will eat. Sprouted oats are always 
good. After the ducks are a month 
or so old we add steamed or soaked 
cut alfalfa or clover hay to the mash. 
— R. B. S. 



PREVENTING CHICKEN GAPES 



The ravages of the deadly gape 
worm go on from year to year with 
but little arrest. Its origin is com- 
paratively unknown and the various 
remedies to control it appear of little 
avail, so the only hope is in preven- 
tion of its gaining a foothold. 

I raised fowls upon the same run 
for 20 years without a single care of 
gapes. The next place to mine was 
taken by a farmer who brought a 
large flock of hens with him. He said 
their former premises had been badly 
infested with gapes. Our chickens 
roamed about the same range as his 
and the next year fully half my 
chicks were infected with the 
scourge, with considerable loss. The 
following year the loss was much 
greater, although I tried almost 
every remedy suggested by experts 
along that line. The next year I 
decided to raise but few chickens. 

They were placed in pens with 
board floors, never being allowed to 
come in contact with the ground un- 
til they were six weeks old. At that 
age I opened the pens after all dew 
was dried up, and let them run in- 
side a small, clean enclosure. 

When two months old they had 
full liberty of the whole range. I fed 
them the usual food, supplied them 
with plenty of gritty sand and greens 
and gave them good care and atten- 
tion. Not a single chick was affected 
by the slightest ailment. Strong and 
sturdy they plainly showed a gain in 
size and appearance over the output 
of previous years. — Mary L. Ray- 
mond. 




QUALITY BABY CHICKS 

20,000 BREEDERS, bred exclusively for high egg 
production, and standard qualities. Every fowl selected 
by the Hogan Test. Our Leghorns, Rocks, Reds, 
Orpington, Wyandottes, and Anconas bred to capacity 
of 200 egg hens. 

LARGE PRODUCTION enables us to sell quality 
chicks at price of common hatchery product 

INCUBATOR CAPACITY 10,000 eggs each day, 
all eggs used are from these flocks. 

Our 32-page illustrated catalogue is free, and gives 
valuable information on care of chicks and poultry. 

Hatching eggs in season at very reasonable prices. 
Chicks shipped by parcel post prepaid, live arrival 
guaranteed. 

MISSOURI POULTRY FARMS, 

Columbia, Mo. 



THE ASIATICS 
Only Book On This Subject 
The largest and best Illustrated book Issued 
to date on mating, breeding, selecting and ex- 
hibiting Light and Dark Brahmas, Buff:, Par- 
tridge, Black and White Cochins, and White 
and Black Langshans. Special articles by fore- 
most breeders, whose accumulated experience 
and knowledge is thus made available at nominal 
cost. 

Two color plates and numerous black-and-white 
illustrations. 96 pages, 9 by 12 Inches. Price 
50c, postpaid. Address Poultry Keeper, Qulncy, 
Illinois. 



ScottsS.CReds 

WIN BEST DISPLAY 

Illinois State Poultry Show, Freeport, 111., Jan 5, to 8. They 
have made many good wins in the hands of customers. 

'TIS A MARK OF DISTINCTION to breed Scott's Beds. Four 
females in egg laying contest, Storrs, Conneticut, layed 840 
eggs in one year, an average of 210 eggs each. If Interested 
write for mating list. 



C. P. SCOTT. 



Box M, 



PEORIA, ILL. 




BABY CHICKS WITH THE STAMP OF QUALITY 

Yes, and They Are Hoganized, Too! 

We hatch the following: Rocks, Reds, Leghorns, Anconas, Andalusians, 
Orpingtons, Wyandottes, Langshans, Cornish, Hamburgs. 
Our 4 0 page catalogue free. 

Brooders, Poultry supplies. We can save you money. 

The Sauth Kenton Poultry Farm, Box 115, Kenton, Ohio 

CHAS. W. WYLIE, Supt. GEO. W. COX, Prop. 



BRED TO WIN AND LAY 



HORNER'S PEDIGREED S. C. REDS 

Cockerels for Sale. We can furnish you with Show birds, or strong fine breeders, $5.00 and 



up. At niinois State Fair, 1st Pen, 
of 47. Adams County Fair, Cockerels, 
Pen; Champion Pullet. Pen mated. 

ERNEST G. HORNER, 



in a hot class of 17 pens, also 2nd Pullet In a class 
1, 3, 4, 5; Pullets, 1, 2, 3, 4,; and Pens 1, 2; Champion 
Write for matting list. 



R. R. 7, 



Quincy, Illinois 



WH A AT ' S CAPON WHY? 

A book that explains whv Capons are the most profitable part of the poultry business and everything 
you will ever want to know about CAPONS. 50 pictures from life that show each step in the 
operation List of Capon Dealers' addresses. Tells how to prevent "Slips," where to get the 
best and cheapest capon tools. Capons are immense eating. Big profits realized. Get wise. This 
book tells how. Copyrighted new and revised edition. Regular 50c copy, prepaid to your address 
(a short time only) for a Dime in coin or stamps. 

1 " GEORGE BEUOY, K. B. 17, CEDAB VALE, KANSAS. 




le "OLD RELIABLE" 

Ohio Hatchery, pioneers 

In the business of Hatching and Selling Chicks. For 28 Tears we 
have been furnishing the public with High Class Chicks which have 
proven So Satisfactory that 60 per cent of our business Is now from 
old customers. T/hl Hatchery Chicks are produced from select, heavy 
laying hens on free range and are strong and vigorous. 
Reasonable Prices, 100% Live Delivery Guaranteed. 
By Prepaid Parcel Post. Leading Varieties. Get our 1922 Catalog 
before buying Chicks. 

The Uhl Hatchery, Box K, New Washington, Ohio 



Page Number 20 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Kills Hatching 

Many fanciers now use Egg-O-Latum, the great 
egg preserver, on all egga for the market. It 
not only keeps them fresh but prevents hatching, 
thus protecting against the pirates who watch 
to obtain high grade hatching stock at market- 
prices. Rub on — wipe off — does not show — Eggs 
will never hatch but keep fresh longer. 

55 ^. ax ^ odorless, tasteless, 

harmless. Applied by simply coating palms of 
the hands, then rubbing on eggs; a dozen a min- 
ute. Keeps eggs fresh one year. A 50c jar 
enough for 50 dozen eggs, .$1 jar for 200 dozen. 
If no dealer, order by card. Postman will col- 
lect. No extra charge. Handy as 'phoning. 
Geo. H. Lee Co., Dept. P-20 Omaha, Neb. 

265fo313Eqqs per Year! 
^ Record — 
$hiteLeqhorn$ 

at AMAZING 
BARGAINS 

Never before has the 
famous Ferris stock been 
offered at such bargain 
prices! Pedigreed ; trapnest- 
ed; Guaranteed! Egg bred 
for 22 years. World's larg- 
est leghorn farms. Write 
for special bargain prices on 
Birds-Eggs and chicks. 

1922 Catalog Free 

Send today for your 

copy of our 1922 Cat- 
alog and Mating List, with 
Special May cut prices. 
Get this catalog and in- 
crease your profits. It's 
Free for the asking. Sim- 
ply send your name and 
address. Write today. 

GEORGE B. FERRIS 
Ave., Grand Rapids, Mich. 




Best Laying 

Hen at the big 
Chicago Poultry 
Show December 
1921 this Ferris 
hen won over 
all breeds in 
the egg laying 
class. O n e of 
many Ferris 
National Win- 



T^owest 
Prices on 
chicks, eggs, 
pullets.hens and 
f males. English or 
lAmerican type. 
(Quick shipment. 
\No delay. Send 
for catalog 
now. 

9095 Union 



A UNIQUE COMBINATION 



nnw'T SELL YOUR 

UUil I EGGS NOW 



Put Them Down In K. & G. Egg Pre- 
servative. Get High Winter Prices 
for Cheap Summer Eggs 

Why sell eggs for only 20c a dozen or less? 
Preserve them now in K. &. G. Next winter, 
when eg* are 60c a dozen or more, you will 
have plenty of egss to eat ami to sell. Fresh, 
new-laid eggs put down in K. & G. remain 
fresh a whole year, and come out of the so- 
lution just like new-laid eggs. 

Kg f The PERFECT EGG 
• &\J» PRESERVATIVE 

K. &. G. Egg Preservative 
keeps eggs 100% perfect. 
Guaranteed to preserve all 
fresh eggs perfectly for one 
year. No change whatever 
takes place. No foul odor, 
strong, or stale taste is 
Imparted to egss. Eggs can 
he used for all purposes; 
yolks do not break down; 
whites whip perfectly. Fresh, 
new-laid eggs remain fresh 
a whole year — come out of 
solution just like new-laid 
eggs. 

K. & G. Egg Preservative 
is not liquid glass or any 
other slimy solution. It 

comes in powder form. 
Makes clear, clean, cool, pleasant solution to 
put eggs in or take out. Cleanest, most per- 
fect egg preservative in the world. 

50c Package Preserves 25 Dozen 

Adds $10 to Value of Eggs 

Stud your order today for all the K. & G. you 
need. Put down 20c eggs and take them out 
when worth 60c. They will be just like new- 
laid eggs. K. & G. is easy to use. Just add 
50c pkg. to 3 gallons water in jar or crock. 
That's all. Package preserves 25 dozen eggs. 
50c postpaid. Order one or more packages now. 

EUREKA SUPPLY HOUSE, Distributors 
3 Wesley Avenue MOUNT MORRIS, ILL. 




The farm flock of poultry and the 
farm asparagus patch may be com- 
bined during the greater part of the 
year to the advantage of both, but 
to the special benefit of the latter. 
Asparagus requires soil that is rich 
in nitrogen, the principal fertilizing 
element in poultry droppings. For 
the successful culture of asparagus 
the ground must be kept free from 
grass and weeds, and the fowls will 
do this work without injury to the 
plants. 

Early in the spring before the 
shoots appear the hens may be 
turned in and as the soil is — or at 
least should be — very rich in humus 
they will give it a thorough surface 
cultivation while scratching for 
grubs and worms. Although they 
will do very little damage to the 
plant unless absolutely starved to it, 
it is best to keep them out during 
the cutting season, or at least to al- 
low them in only now and then for a 
day if grass or weeds become trou- 
blesome. 

After the cutting season is over 
the patch may be used as range for 
growing chicks or old fowls, and un- 
less the area is too large neither 
grass nor weeds will be in evidence. 
The added cultivation and fertilizer 
thus secured will materially increase 
the size of the asparagus crop. — C. N. 
Whittaker, Van Buren Co., Mich. 



RAISING TURKEYS 

I keep the turkey eggs till the 
first turkey hen wants to sit. Keep 
the eggs near the same temperature 
and turn every day, then put about 
15 under the turkey hen and the rest 
under chicken hens. Break up the 
other hens and let them lay second 
laying. 

As soon as turks hatch take from 
hen until all are hatched, then put 
20 or 25 with turkey hen and the 
rest with chicken hens, in large airy 
coops, near together so that they may 
come out and feed together after a 
few days. 

I find the greatest trouble is keep- 
ing the little turks free from lice. 
I have tried different kinds of louse 
killers but find nothing so effectual 
as clean lard. Just a little rubbed 
on top of head the first week. Then 
on top of wings and vent every week 
till they are 5 or 6 weeks old. 

I never feed anything but curd 
from the creamery milk (as we pa- 
tronize the creamery) and I give 
them all the milk they want and 
clean water to drink until they are 5 
or 6 weeks old. Then let mothers 
out of coops for first time (of course 
I feed the mothers whole grain and 
plenty of grit). At this time they 
are large enough to begin to rustle 
for themselves, but will never fail to 
come up for their feed and will all 
follow the turkey hen. Feed them 
wheat or chopped feed with curd for 
a while and soon they can eat grain 
altogether. 

By following this plan I have never 
failed in my 20 years turkey raising 
to raise a good sized flock of tur- 
keys. And with prices as they have 
been the past few years, I think the 
pin money question is solved for 
farmers' wives. — Mrs. John Williams, 
111. 



Feed Baby Chicks 
Soon As Hatched 

Prevent White Diarrhea 



Baby chicks, when hatched, must be given 
a preventive against white diarrhea, which is 
responsible for 90 per cent of the loss to 
poultry raisers. 

Dr. E. J. Netherton. a veterinarian of 30 
years' experience, has prepared a feeding 
which is to be given as soon as hatched. 
Chicks and turkeys fed this the first thing do 
not get white diarrhea, and thus you save 90 
per cent of every hatch. 

Dr. Netherton is so confident that he will 
send a dollar package to any honest person. 
Send no money; do not pay the postman; but 
if satisfied with results, after fair trial, re- 
mit one dollar. If not pleased you owe 
nothing. 

Take advantage of this liberal offer today. 
Simplv send name to Dr. Netherton, N-&-H 
Co., 382 N. Seventh St., Kansas City, Kan. 



MILLER'S 

THE OLD RELIABLE ILLINOIS HATCHERY. 

Select Chicks from Heavy Laying Hens. 

White and Brown Leg- 
horns, 50-$7, 100-513, 
500-SG2.50. Barred Rocks 
and S. C. Reds, 50-$8, 
100-$15, 500-$72.50. W. 
Wyandottes, W. Rocks, 
R. C. Reds, 50-S8.50, 
100 -$16., 500 -$77.50. 
Black Langshan, Buff 
Orpington, Parks Barred 
Rocks, 50-S9, 100-S17, 
500-S82.50. S. C. An- 
conas, 331 Egg Strain, 
50-$9.50, 100-$18, 500-$87.50. Buff Rocks, 50- 
l?9.50, 100-818.00, 50O-$87.50. White Orpingtons, 
50-S10.50, 100-S20.00. 100 per cent Live Delivery 
Guaranteed. Prepaid Parcel Post. Order Now 
From This Ad and Save Time. Reference, 
State Bank. Catalogue Free. 
MILLER HATCHERY, Box K, Heyworth, HI. 




Cured Her 

Rheumatism 

Knowing from terrible experience the suf- 
fering caused by rheumatism, Sirs. J. E. Hurst, 
who lives at 508 E. Olive St., B 6, Blooming- 
ton, 111., is so thankful at having cured her- 
self that out of pure gratitude she is an- 
xious to tell all other sufferers just how to 
get rid of their torture by a simple way at 
home. 

Mrs. Hurst has nothing to sell. Merely cut 
out this notice, mail it to her with your 
own name and address, and she will gladly 
send you this valuable information entirely 
free. Write her at once before you forget. 



BABY CHICKS 

Bred Right. Hatched 
Right, from Free Range 
Stock of select quality. 
97% Live Delivery Guar- 
anteed by parcel post di- 
rect from hatchery. We 
hatch Barred, White 

C Rocks Reds, White, Gold- 
•X^yJfl* en Wyandottes, White, 

Brown Leghorns, Anconas, 
. V-ir-^ Broiler Chicks. Writ* for 

our *Tee Illustrated Catalog. NEW WASHING- 
TON HATCHERY, Dept. K. New Washington, 0 




LEG BANDS 

All guaranteed-Any 8ize-fc]j 
ALUMINUM BANDS fj 
with raised figures, z 
price postpaid, 10-1 5c, ,5 
25-25c, 50-35C, 100-60C. l "* 
ECONOMY colored 

celluloid with 





aluminum back. 

Any color, two large black num- 
bers in each band, prices 12-30c, 
25-50C, 50-SOe. 1OO-S1.50 
Makers of 25 different styles of 

of LEG & WING hands. 
The National Poultry Band Co. 
Send for catalog. Newport, Ky. 



LOOK c B „?c B K Y s $9.50 a 100 

10 varieties. World's greatest laying strains, 
rullets. egas. stock, seeds, feed. etc. Write to 
HOTJCK'S LEGHORN FARM. Box 81. Tiffin, O. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 21 



SURE QUICK 
DEATH FOR 
RATS AND MICE 

Remarkable Triple Strength 
Virus Kills Every One 
Not A Poison 



MARVELOUS FRENCH DISCOVERY 



Eats are your enemies. They destroy your 
buildings, eat your grain, kill your poultry, 
start fires and spread disease In every com- 
munity. You need no longer suffer these 
losses — You can now in a week's time easily 
kill every rat, mouse or gopher with Bat 
Virus, the great French discovery. Our triple 
strength virus is the most powerful concen- 
trated deadly virus known, the only sure, safe 
rodent destroyer. 

Triple Strength Virus is absolutely safe to 
use anywhere — positively not a poison. No 
danger to chickens, horses, cattle, hogs or 
dogs. Harmless to children or grown persons. 
Affects only rodents. 




BACK YARD POULTRY PAIS 



Triple Strength Virus Is prepared in a scien- 
tific laboratory and contains only Virus germs 
deadly to rodents. The bottle and corks are 
sterilized and sealed air tight, so that all other 
germs are excluded. This is why Triple Strength 
Virus is so deadly. It is tested on rats, mice 
and gophers before shipment — It cannot fail. 

Rats Die Outside 

Triple Strength Rat Virus is easy to use. 
Simple directions show how. A single rat eat- 
ing the virus gets sick with a contagious 
plague disease that affects and kills all rats 
and mice in the immediate vicinity. Eats flee 
because they become infected with a plague 
that affects the heart, blood vessels, and lungs, 
destroying the blood corpuscles and causing 
suffocation. The rats rush outside where they 
get fresh air and water. 'When the diseased 
rats get outside, they never get back for the 
disease is then so far gone it kills them. No 
odor, no dead rats to handle, no live rats to kill. 

Special Introductory Offer 

We want to prove to you our claim that 
Triple Strength Eat Virus is the most potent, 
most powerful — yet non-poisonous and abso- 
lutely safe — rat virus on the market. It is a 
TRIPLE STEENGTH Virus. Contains more 
living rat virus germs than any other rat killer 
made and will go one-third to one-half farther. 
To introduce this powerful Triple Strength 
Eat Virus, we will make every reader of this 
paper — for short time only — a special offer of 
a regular $2.50 bottle for only $1.00 postpaid. 
This $2.50 bottle Triple Strength Eat Virus 
is enough to clear a big poultry house, barn or 
yard of rats and mice. 

Money Back Guarantee 

Your money back if it fails. Take no chances 
this year with traps or rat poisons. Only 
Triple Strength Eat Virus will positively kill 
rats, mice and gophers and be absolutely safe 
and sure. Give it according to directions — if 
after 30 days' trial you find any rats or mice — 
we will refund your money without question. 
Send $1 bill today sure. 

If not convenient to send $1 today — just send 
your name and address, a postal will do — pay 
postman $1 and a few cents postage on arrival 
for regular $2.50 bottle. Eemember it costs 
you nothing if it does not do all we claim. 

Agents Wanted in every community, 
GOLD SEAL LABORATORIES 
3842 W. Lake, Dept 325, Chicago, 111. 



Editor Poultry Keeper: 

In your April number 1 see that 
J. E. R., Illinois, wants to know if 
back yard poultry pays. 

I will give my experience in the 
raising ot poultry on a city lot 
5 4x1 a 6 with a house 30x34 setting 
back 25 ft. from the curb. 

I bulit a poultry house 12x40 at 
a cost of material, sand and cement 
for foundation, lumber and rubber- 
oid roofing, nails, sash glass and 
paint for $65.57, I done all the work 
myself, $8.00 for eggs, $17.00 for an 
incubator. A total of $92.57. 

I hatched out and raised 37 pullets 
and 28 cockerels. 

I sold 6 cockerels for $12.00, saved 
4 and eat the rest. 

The pullets began laying in Novem- 
ber and I began to sell eggs in De- 
cember, and sold as follows: 

December $16.26 

January 19.46 

February 18.25 

March 12.25 

April, (to date, 20) .... 8.75 

$74.97 

Cockerels 12.00 

Total $86.97 

This is above the eggs that I used 
in my home, with a family of 9. The 
cost of my feed was $49.50 and I 
have enough to last me until May 
15 th. 

I never had any experience with 
poutly before, and took advice from 
others, and some I trusted to luck, 
but I went into it with a lot of "pep" 
and stuck with it. I fed my little 
chicks on Wayne growing mash and 
scratch feed and gave them all they 
could eat at all times with plenty 
of fresh water, charcoal and grit be- 
fore them all the time. 

I have the Ancona breed, and have 
200 or more chicks in the brooder 
and will build more house making 
over all 30x40. 

I think a back yard flock pays, if 
you put a lot of work and pep be- 
hind it. 

You see that from an investment 
of $142.07 I got a return of $86.97 
and have my incubator and house 
for this season, and my little flock 
of yearling hens.- — G. W. J., Indiana. 



'OLD RELIABLE" HATCHERY 



On page 19 of this issue will be 
found the advertisement of Uhl 
Hatchery, Box K, New Washington, 
Ohio, familiarly known throughout 
the middle west as the "Old Relia- 
ble" Hatchery. For 22 years this 
hatchery has been furnishing high 
grade chicks on which they guaran- 
tee 100 per cent live delivery. They 
have all the leading varieties and will 
take pleasure in sending a copy of 
their 1922 catalogue free to prospec- 
tive buyers of baby chicks. We can 
recommend this company very highly 
indeed and urge our readers to writ 
them for catalogue and prices. 



MAKE OP A CLUB 



Make up a club of your own, choosing the 
papers or magazines you want to take. Write 
and let me quote a special cut price. I can 
save you considerable money on your subscrip- 
tions. A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, 111. 



$1 Q££ Buys 1 40-Egg Champion I 

10 Belle City Incubator! 

Hot- Water.Copper Tank, Double Walls 
Fibre Board, Self Regulated, causae 
S7.9S buyB 140-Chick Hot-V|^ 5 ' ^ 
Water Brooder. Or both for only ' ** ™ ™" 

Express Prepaid 

East of Rockies and - 
allowed to points West, ilsors 
Guaranteed. Order now. Share 
'in in? $1 OOO In Prizes, or write 
fprFree Book "HatchingFacts." 
It tells everything. Jim Rohan, Pre* 

Bene City Incubator Co.,bo» 145 Racine, Wis. 





Watchlm 



Success in raising the chicks you hate! 
depends most largely on feed and care 
in the first 10 days. 



F.P.G. Ohaefc Manna 

For Chicks, Turkeys, Pheasants 

proved its wonderful merit in 1884. Since 
then we have watched Quality, Quality, 
QUALITY, — regardless of cost. Only best 
cereals, animal food, etc. : no seconds. 
Wholesome as your own food. 

F. P. C. Chick Manna is not the cheap- 
est feed; it can't he. But it will save 
the chicks. At dealers or write us. Satis- 
faction or money back. 




F. P. 



Box 30 



CASSEL'S SON 

Lansdale, Pa. 





Our big Free Flower 
Circular tells you 
howbeginners make 
S100 to S500. spare 
timein onesummer 
raising flowers on a 
very small patch of 
ground, back-yard. 
Learn this easy and 
delightful business. 



FOR BIG PROFITS 

Send your name and get Big 
Flower Circular Free by return 

mail. American Horticulture Co. 
.Department 55 Des Moines. Iowa 



QUALITY BABY CHICKS 



Missouri Poultry Farms, Columbia, 
Mo., is giving special attention to 
the quality of baby chicks produced 
in their hatchery. They have 20,000 
breeders, bred exclusively for high 
egg production and standard quality. 
All of their breeders are selected by 
the Hogan Test with the result that 
baby chicks sold by them should 
prove exceptional values in the hands 
of their customers. They have a 
32-page catalogue which will be sent 
free to readers of Poultry Keeper. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

The classified advertisers In POTJLT H Y 
KEEPER are coining money fast this year. 
It pays to keep your announcement before 
the people. That Is the way to establish 
a reputation for your business. Why nnt 
go after the people, get good prices, and 
make more money this year! 

BATES 

Bates for Ads. Classified under proper 
Headings are as follows: 

1 month _ 6c per word 

2 months 11c per word 

3 months _ 16c per word 

4 months 20c per word 

1 year 50c per word 



ANCONAS 



S. C. ANCONA— Iowa State Fair Blue Bibbon 
Winners. Heavy laying strain Baby Chix. 
$15.00 per 100. Eggs $1.50 per 15, $6.00 per 
100. John J. Schwartz, Ottumwa, Iowa. 3-3 



SINGLE COMB ANCONAS— Few large, dark, 
vigorous, heavy laying hens for sale at $3.00 
apiece. Shipped on approval. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. No hatching eggs this year. F. 
Baymond Benson, Elgin, Dl. 



SINGLE COMB ANCONAS— Eggs from four star 
matings. Mating list. Keiran & Baab, Fond 
du Lac, Wis. 4-2 



ANCONA HATCHING EGGS— Both combs at 
reduced price. Geo. Hecker, Earlvllle, Iowa. 

3-3 



Page Number 22 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



1 BREEDER'S CARDS | 

o o 



ANCONAS 



S. C. ANCONA EGGS FOB HATCHING— from 

selected stock $3.00 per 15. From range flock 
$2.00. Fine stock for sale reasonable. Joseph 
A. Triplett, Egg Harbor City, N. J. 3-4 

SHATTO'S SINGLE COMB ANCONAS — Baby 
chicks from winners. Hoganized layers. Vac- 
cinated against disease. Ten years breeding 
Anconas. Satisfied customers everywhere. Gny 
H. Shatto, Dunkirk, Ind. 3-4 

EOSE COMB ANCONA STOCK FOB SALE — 

Cheap for quality. Eggs 52.25, $5.00, $10.00 for 
15. 100-$9.00. Chicks 20c, 100-$18.00. Mrs. E. 
J. Crawford, Owatonna, Minn. 

EGGS FEOM FABM-EANGE S. C. ANCONAS, 

Excellent utlity stock, 30-$2.75, 60-$5.00, 100- 
$8.00. Mrs. Henry Newcomer, Mt. Morris, 111. 

SINGLE COMB ANCONAS— 100 selected hatch- 
ing eggs $6.00. 2 settings $2.50. Joseph 
Partsch, Humphrey, Nebr. 2-4 

BLUE ANDALUSIANS 

BLUE ANDALUSIANS BABY CHICKS— High 
quality. Reasonable prices. Catalogue Free. 
South Kenton Poultry Farm, Kenton, Ohio. 

BLUE ANDALUSIAN EGGS— Pen one 15-$3.00; 
Pen two 15-$2.00, prepaid. John Cerny, Cob- 
den, 111. 

BUTTEECUPS 

BUTTERCUPS — Blue Ribbon Winners; great 
layers, delicious meat. Sheppard's Anconas. 
Chicks, eggs. A. Wermeiskirehen, Hokah, Minn. 



BABY CHICKS 

BABY CHICKS FOR SALE — S. C. Anconas, 
AVhite Minorcas, $7.50 per 50; $15.00 per 100. 
Mrs. Joe Price, Dow City, la. 

10,000 CHICKS EACH WEEK — May prices, 
Grade A $18, Grade B $15. June and later all 
grades Clucks at $10 per 100, Eggs $6. Pedi- 
greed, Trap-nested, Imported Barron stock with 
no hen under 248-egg record in six years 
breeding. Also D. W. Young S. C. White Leg- 
horns, direct, separate. Our customers say we 
have Best stock in America. Catalog. 8,000 
early pullets, $1.50 each. Brownstown Poultry 
Farm, Brownstown, Indiana. 5-3 

BABY CHICKS— from Hoganized, standard bred 
flocks, Barred Rocks, White Rocks, R. I. Reds, 
White Wyandottes, Buff Orpingtons, Anconas 
and White Leghorns, $10.50 up. Send for Cata- 
log. Sieb's Hatchery, Lincoln, 111. 

500,000 — Day-old to four weeks chicks. Single 
combed White and Brown Leghorns, Barred 
Rocks. Hatching eggs. Failing Poultry Farm, 
Lafargeville, N. Y. 4-3 

DAY OLD CHICKS OF QUALITY — from Free 
Range Flocks at low prices. White and Brown 
Leghorns, R. I. Reds, Barred and White Rocks, 
Buff Orpingtons, Silver AVyandottes, Black 
Spanish and Anconas. Prices free. Blanchester 
Hatchery, Blanchester, Ohio. 3-4 

21 STAND ABD-BBED VAEIETIES— heavy egg- 
laying strains. Prices adsolutely right. Hatch- 
eries in five states. Prompt prepaid shipment 
any time. Safe arrival guaranteed. Catalog 
free. Schaefer Hatchery, 2915 Grand Ave., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 3-3 

CHICKS— C. O. D. Parcel Post. 2000 miles. 
Pay on arrival at your Post Office. Bargain 
prices. My 17th year. Literature free. C. M. 
Lauver, Box 68, McAlisterville, Pa. 3-6 

BABY CHICKS — White and Brown Leghorns, 
Anconas, Barred, Buff and White Rocks, Reds 
and White Wyandottes. Price llBt free. Oak- 
Wood Poultry Farm, Box 37B, Yellow Springs, 
Ohio. 2-4 

BABY CHICKS— Nine varieties; lowest prices; 
Illustrated catalog free, telling how to raise 
them. Judson Hatchery, Galesburg, Illinois. 2-4 

CUSTOM HATCHING— Write for our method 
of hatching to order. Free circular. Custom 
Hatchery, Dept. O, Box 303, Riverside, N. J. 

2-4 

LOOK (100,000 12c AND UP) CHICKS— Best 
bred-to-lay, profit paying kind only. 20 varieties. 
Hatching eggs. Ducklings. Catalog. Beckman 
Hatchery, 26 E. Lyon, Grand Rapids, Mich. 2-5 

BABY CHICKS— Ten leading varieties from pure 
bred, large range, properly culled utility Btock. 
Prices right. Circular free. Modern Hatchery, 
Mt. Blanchard, Ohio. 1-6 



BREEDER'S CARDS 



BABY CHICKS 



BABY CHICKS — Half Million for 1922. Twelve 
leading pure breeds from heavy egg producing 
strains. Alive delivery guaranteed. Catalog. 
Smith Brothers Hatcheries, Mexico, Mo. 1-9 

BABY CHICKS— Capacity 100,000. Headquar- 
ters for Rocks, Leghorns, Minorcas, Reds, W. 
Wyandottes and Broilers, 11c up. Order early. 
Catalogue free, postage prepaid. Sunnyslde 
Hatchery, Liverpool, Pa., C. J. Strawser, Prop. 

1- 6 

BANTAMS 

BANTAMS — Black Tailed Japanese Cockerels for 
sale. A. D. Davis, Britton, Mich. 3-2 

BANTAMS AND EGGS — 22 Varieties . 2c stamp 
for circular. Fenn Bantam Yards, (Desk 77), 
Delavan, Wis. 

BBAHMAS 

LIGHT BEAHMAS — Hatching eggs, Pen 1, 
$2.50; Pen 2, $2.00 per 15. Solum Bros., Wood- 
ville, Wis. 5-2 

LIGHT BEAHMA'S HATCHING EGGS — $3.00 
per 15, prepaid and insured. Mrs. Burchell, 
Eossmoyne, Ohio. 

DABK BEAHMA HATCHING EGGS — $3.00-15, 
$5.00-30, Bose Comb White Wyandotte eggs, 
$2.00-15, $3.50-30 postpaid. Carl Roske, Bar- 
rett, Minnesota. 4-2 

LIGHT BBAHMAS — Consistent Coliseum win- 
ners, with size, type and color. Eggs $7.50 
per 13. Oscar Grow, Waterloo, la. 3-2 

LIGHT BEAHMA BABY CHICKS— High qual- 
ity. Reasonable prices. Catalogue Free. South 
Kenton Poultry Farm, Kenton, Ohio. 

LIGHT BEAHMA EGGS— Pen 1— $3.00. Pen 
2— $2.00 per setting 15. N. E. Murdy, Green- 
field, Iowa. 2-4 

LIGHT BBAHMAS — Cavey Farm, Elkhorn, Wis 

12-12 

COENISH 

DABK COENISH BABY CHICKS— High qual- 
ity. Reasonable prices. Catalogue Free. South 
Kenton Poultry Farm, Kenton, Ohio. 

COCHINS 

NINTZEL'S NOTED PAETBIDGE COCHINS— 

Stock and eags. Nintzel Bros., Oshkosh, Wis. 

2- 3 



DUCKS AND GEESE 



MAMMOTH PEKIN EGGS — Forty §5.00; 100- 
$8.00. Mrs. Frank Spurling, Forest Park, 111. 

5-4 

WHITE PEKIN DUCKS — Large stock. 13 eggs 
two dollars, 100 ten dollars. Baby Ducklings. 
Postpaid and insured. W. E. Metcalf, Hunting- 
ton, Didiana. 4-2 

PUKE-BEED MAMMOTH EOUEN DUCK EGGS 

from prize-winning stock. 12-$2.00, 30-$4.50, 
60-$8.50, 100-$12.00. Mrs. Henry Newcomer, Mt. 
Morris, Dl. 

LAEGE TOULOUSE GEESE— Eggs 40 cents each 
prepaid. John Cerny, Cobden, 111. 

BUFF OEPINGTON DUCKS — Ezgs $1.75 per 
dozen. Postpaid 5th zone. John Eyer, Fort 
Jennings, Ohio. 3-3 

EGGS— Mammoth Pekin 50-$5.00, 100-$8.00. 
White Holland also Bourbon Red Turkeys 10- 
$8.00. Mrs. Frank Spurling, Forest Park, 111. 

8-4 

BUFF OEPINGTON DUCK EGGS — $2-15. post- 
paid. Insured, In three zones. Rauch's Poultry 
Yard, Jenera, Ohio. 2-4 

HOETON'S HIGH QUALITY FAWN AND 

White Indian Bunner duck eggs for hatching. 
Sylvan View Poultry Farm, Curryvllle, Mo. 2-5 

SILKIES 

WHITE SILKIE EGGS— $2-00 per 13. Cockerels. 
Arthur Worthington, B. 3, Two Elvers, Wis. 

8-3 

FAVOEOLLES 

WHITE FAVEBOLLES— Foremost utility fowls. 
Greatest winter layers. Develop quickly. Eggs 
and chicks from prize winners. Pixley, R. 2, 
Wayne, Mich. 3-4 

GUINEAS 

ONE FIFTY FIFTEEN WHITE GUINEA EGGS, 
postpaid. L. Leavitt, Smithfield, Dl. 



BREEDER'S CARDS 



HOUDANS 



DABK HOUDAN STOCK FOE SALE— Range 
eggs $5.00 per hundred. M. Stephenson, Welton, 
Iowa. 4-2 



HAMBUEGS 



SELVES SPANGLED HAMBUEGS BABY 

Chicks. High quality. Reasonable prices. 
Catalogue Free. South Kenton Poultry Farm, 
Kenton, Ohio. 

SILVEB SPANGLED HAMBUBG COCKEBELS 

and eggs. Frank Heilman, Knox, Did. 3-3 



WHITE LANGSHANS 



WHITE LANGSHAN BABY CHICKS— High 
quality. Reasonable prices. Catalogue Free. 
South Kenton Poultry Farm, Kenton, Ohio. 

WHITE LANGSHAN EGGS FOB HATCHING — 

Prize stock, 46 pullets layed 927 eggs in Dec. 
Pen 1, $2.00 per 15; Pen 2, $1.00. Baby chicks. 
Mrs. H. S. Brown, Salem, Iowa. 3-3 

BLACK LANGSHANS 

BLACK LANGSHAN BABY CHICKS — High 
quality. Reasonable prices. Catalogue free. 
South Kenton Poultry Farm, Kenton, Ohio. 

BIG BLACK LANGSHANS — Setting $2.50, 100- 
$10.00. 100 Chlx $25.00. Ella Whltwood, Hud- 
son, HI. 

LEGHORNS 

300 SINGLE COMB WHITE AND BEOWN LEG- 

horns, 1 year hens, cockerels, pullets. Hatching 
eggs. A. Schroeder, St. Peter, 111. 12-12 

WHITE LEGHOENS 

BAEEON'S BIG WHITE LEGHOENS— All high 
record stock. Reduced prices on eggs, chicks 
and breeding stock. Booking 8 weeks pullets 
and cockerels. Chas. W. Johnson, Linton, Ind. 

WE ARE PEEPABED TO MAKE IMMEDIATE 

shipment of Single Comb White Leghorn English 
strain hatching eggs from stock whose records 
run from 210 to 300 eggs per year, $2.50 per 
15, $10.00 per hundred, all eggs carefully se- 
lected and candled. Prompt shipment "guar- 
ranteed. Lewis A. Daily, McLeansboro, Dl. 5-2 

GUAEANTEED PUEE-BRED S. C. W. LEG- 

horn eggs. Ferris 265-300 strain direct, $6.00 
per 100 prepaid. Mrs. Roy Appleton, Edge- 
wood, la. 

PULLETS, BABY CHICKS— If you want Leg- 
horns of Superior Quality, Kuhu has them at 
let live prices. Be wise and write Kuhn be- 
fore you buy. H. M. Kuhn, Sycamore, Ohio. 4-3 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORN EGGS FOB HATCH- 

ing, $2.00 per 15. Pen 1, $5.00 per 50. Mrs. 
Ellen E. Omans, Frazee, Minn. 

S. C. W. LEGHOENS — Ferris strain, heavy 
layers. Eggs 15-$1, 100-$5. Mrs. John Pearcy, 
Martinsville, Indiana. 4-2 

S. C. W. LEGHOEN EGGS— Winter layers. 
$2.00 per 15 prepaid. Mrs. L. Malmborg, R. 1, 
Ishpeming, Mich. 4-2 

FEEEIS SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHOEN 

hatching eggs 15 eggs $1.00, 30-$1.75, 50-$2.50, 
100-$4.50, prepaid. Also Registered Holstein 
cattle, either sex. Leo Kuhl & Son, Hazel 
Green, Wisconsin. 4-2 

BAEEON SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHOENS, 

15 eggs 75 cents, 100-$4.75. 20 years breeder. 
Geo. E. Adams, Green Bay, Wis.," R. 7. 4-2 

CLOVEBDALE LEGHOEN FAEM AND HATCH- 

ery. Breeders of S. C. White Leghorns. Youngs 
foundation stock. Eggs and baby chicks. Cir- 
culars free. Aurora, Mo. 3-3 

KOEPSELL'S 230-300 EGG-BEED SINGLE 

Comb White Leghorns. Chicks and eggs at 
prepaid prices. Catalog Free. Koepsell Leghorn 
Farm, Sta. E., Mayville, Wise. 3-3 

WHITE LEGHOEN EGGS — Thornburg's, FerrlB 
world's greatest layers. Eggs, 15-$1.50, 100- 
$6.00, delivered. Valley Egg and Dairy Farm. 
Campbell, Mo., R. 4. 3-3 

THE T. F. LANGABEEE S. C. WHITE LEG- 

horn plant offers eggs from 12 pens of trap 
nested stock. (Eleven years use of trap nests.) 
3 best pens, 15 e?es $5.00; 9 pens, 15 eggs 
$2.00, 100 eggs, $8.00. Cockerels $3.00 each. 
508 W. Oak St., Falrbury, Dl. 

S. C. W. LEGHORN EGGS— from good laying 
stock. Farm range. Maude Davis, Sabula, la. 

3-3 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 2 3 



| BREEDER'S CARDS. I 
o o 

WHITE LEGHORNS 

SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORN EGGS FOR 

hatching. Flock 1 — 52.00 per 15; $10.00 per 
100. Flock 2— $1.25 per 15; $5.00 per 100. J. 
R. Frew, Eustis, Nebr. 

WHITE LEGHORN BABY CHICKS — American 
or English from selected heavy producers. Cir- 
cular. Frank Heinz, Bos 12, Comstock Park, 
Jlich. 

BROWN LEGHORNS 

S. C. DARK BROWN LEGHORNS — Eggs only. 
Cc each delivered. Willis Fairbanks, Mora, 
Minn. 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS— Light and dark- 
great layers. Surplus stock and eggs very 
reasonable. Henry Tushaus, 1000 Vine St., 
Quincy, 111. 2-4 

W. W. KTTLP, BOX 30, POTTSTOWN, PA.— 

The leaders In size and contest winners. Cata- 
log. Both combs. 

BLACK LEGHORNS 

100 BLACK LEGHORN CHIX $20.00; 600, 
$95.00. Ella Whitwood, Hudson, 111. 

BLACK LEGHORN BABY CHICKS— High qual- 
ity. Reasonable prices. Catalogue Free. South 
Kenton Poultry Farm, Kenton, Ohio. 

BUFF LEGHORNS 

SINGLE COMB BUFF LEGHORNS— Solid buff. 
Heavy layers. Eggs from special pens $1.25 
per 15, $6.00 per 100. Arthur Worthlngton, 
Two Rivers, Wis. 

SPECIALLY BRED MANY GENERATIONS— 

for stamina, large yield of big eggs, and beauty. 
I have the goods. Both combs. Eggs, hens and 
pens reasonable. Catalog. Joseph Benedict, 
Chevy Chase, Maryland. 

MINORCAS 

BLACK MINORCAS. BUFF ORPINGTONS, 

Eggs. Ten varieties baby chicks. Frank A. 
Agnew, Southside, Omaha, Nebr. 3-4 

WHITE AND BLACK MINORCAS — Both Combs. 
Blue ribbon winners Chicago National and Illi- 
nois State Show. Eggs $2.00, $3.00 and $5.00. 
A. Kuchemann, Galena, 111. 

MAMMOTH S. C. BLACK MINORCAS— $1 per 
15 eggs. Zula Edwards, Van Wert, Ohio. 4-2 

GIANT SINGLE COMB BLACK MINORCAS— 

Setting $3.00; 100-$12.00. Ella Whitwood, Hud- 
son, HI. 

ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCA EGGS — Winter 
layers, prize winners. Jay Folfer Beswlck, 
Berea, Ohio. 3-3 

ROSE COMB WHITE MINORCAS— 30 eggs, pre- 
paid, $4. H. L. Carson, Middleport, Ohio. 3-5 

BLUE ORPINGTONS 

LOOK — Royal Blue Orpingtons. Winners. John 
Unangst, 1214 Prairie Ave., Freeport, m. 3-12 

WHITE ORPINGTONS 

S. C. WHITE ORPINGTON EGGS— Heavy lay- 
ers, $1.50 per 15; $7.00 per 100. Elva Cantwell. 
Bucklln, Mo. 3-4 

BUFF ORPINGTONS 

S. C. BUFF ORPINGTON HATCHING EGGS 

from good laying strain 15-$1.50, 100-$6.' Ed. 
Scheffers, Monroe, la. 

BUFF ORPINGTON HATCHING EGGS — Re- 
duced prices. Write for free mating list. 
Walter Goessling, 930 Jefferson St., Quincy, 111. 



RHODE ISLAND REDS 

ROSE COMB REDS — Show quality, noted for 
color. Eggs $2.50 per 15. John Allen, Nobles- 
ville, Ind. 

ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND RED EGGS — 

$1.00 per 15, $6.00 per 100. Bred to lay. Mrs. 
Joe Walz, Glen Haven, Wis. 4-3 

REDS THAT LAY! The strain that pays. 
Rose Comb. Eggs. Circular. Albert Bern- 
hardt, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. 

SINGLE ALSO ROSE COMB REDS — Setting 
$1.50, 100-$7.00. 100 chix $20.00. Ella Whit- 
wood, Hudson, HI. 

ROSE COMB RED EGGS — From prize winners 
and record layers. (Bean strain.) Mating list. 
Daugherty's Poultry Farm, Metcalf, HI. 8-2 



BREEDER'S CARDS | 

o 

RHODE ISLAND REDS 



ROSE COMB BEDS— Bean strain. Exhibition 
quality. Trapnested ten years, yearly records 
to 306 eggs. Three pens, eggs 25, 20, 15 cents 
each. Jos. Forge, Burlington, Wise. 

PHEASANTS 

RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS— $5 for 15, post 
paid. Charles Knecht, 1715 N. 13th St., Kansas 
City, Kans. 3-4 

PIGEONS 

I OFFER — mated Homers. $2.00 pair. Beauti- 
White Homers, $3.00 pair. Get my prices 
on Runts, Carneaux, Maltese Hens. Free book- 
let. Squab Mannual 50c. Charles B. Gilbert, 
2210 Almond St., Philadelphia, Pa. 10-6 

RABBITS 

THREE DOLLARS PAIR — Four months Belgian 
Hares. Luther Leavitt, Smithfreld, 111. 

PARTRIDGE ROCKS 

EGG RECORD PARTRIDGE ROCKS— National 
and Coliseum winners. Eggs, chicks, stock. 
Riley Smith, Albion, Ind. 3-3 

WHITE ROCKS 

SNYDER'S WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS — Eggs 
$2.00 a setting from No. 1 Pens. Dellwood 
Poultry Yards, A. S. Snyder, Dellwood, N. Y. 

4-3 

LARGE PURE BRED WHITE ROCKS — Hatch- 
ing eggs from prize winners and splendid laying 
strain. Fishel direct at $2.00 per 15. A satis- 
factory hatch guaranteed. H. L. Adair, Clay- 
ton, HI. 

BARRED ROCKS 

BARRED ROCK EGGS — Park's strain $1.50-15, 
$5.00-100. Mrs. A. Revell, Central City, Iowa. 

PARKS BARRED ROCKS — Fifteen fertile eggs 
$2, hundred $8. Eight week old pullets $15 
dozen. Eva Bojar, St. Bernard, Ohio. 

BARRED ROCKS — Hatching eggs, sixty cents 
per setting. Mrs. E. E. Mark, Stronghurst, 
Hlinois. 3-3 

"CACKLERS" ARE PUREBRED BRED-TO-LAY 

Barred Rocks. Trapnested bv Geo. W. Pratt. 
Cropsey. HI. 18 eggs $2.50: 36-$4.50, 72-$8.00. 
100-$10.00, prepaid. Circular free. Stock all 
sold. 2-12 

PARKS ROCKS— Eggs that will hatch. Cata- 
log. W. W. Kulp, Box 30, Pottstown. Pa. 

BARRED ROCK EGGS — Range $6.00-100, Pen 
Holterman $4.00-15. Floyd Friedow, Kanawha. 
Iowa. 4-2 

BRADLEY STRAIN— Eggs $1.50-$10.00. S. M. 
Phelps. Monmouth, HI. 2-4 

MY VICTORY STRAIN OF BARRED ROCKS— 

AVon at Toledo, O., Nov. 29th to Dec. 4th, 1921. 
3, 4, 5. Ex Cock: 2 Ex Cockerel: 1. 2, Ex Hen;» 
3 Ex Pullet: 1, 2, Pullet Bred Cock: 2 Cock- 
erel Bred Pen; Silver Medal for Best Display. 
Barred Rock Club shape and color specials. 
Send for photo of my winning birds. J. T. 
French, 838 West Grove Place, Toledo. Ohio. 

PARK'S STRAIN BARRED ROCK CHICKS 

and Selected eggs. Priced right. Eva Bojar, 
Saint Bernard, Ohio. 3-3 

SEVERAL VARIETIES 

LOOK! LOOK!— Eggs $1.00 per 15. $5.50 hun- 
dred. 25 breeds greatest special price list free. 
Fleming Bros., Shelbyville, Illinois. 4-2 

BUFF ORPINGTON AND ANCONA EGGS 

from exhibition stock. Exceedingly heavy egg 
laying strains. Roup and Son, Ames, Iowa. 4-2 

EGGS — Single Comb Buff and Brown Leehorns, 
White (Guineas and other varieties, 15 eggs 
$2.00. Viola Woods, Albion, Hlinois. 4-2 

SINGLE COMB REDS $1.50 SETTING— Exhibi- 
tion S. C. White Leghorns SI .50 setting. Wild 
Mallards $3 setting. English Callers $5 set- 
ting. Prepaid. O. Robey, MaryvlIIe, Mo. 3-4 

SHEPPARD S. C. ANCONA AND PENNSYL- 

vnnia S. C. W. Leghorn eirers for hatching, 
$2.50 per 15. H. E. Ritter, Mlddlebnrg, Pa. 

EGGS— From pure bred stock. Sheppnrd's 831 
eeg strain Anconas 15-$3.00: J00-$15.00. Park's 
bred-to-lav Barred Rocks. 15-S1.50: 100-$7.50. 
White Orpingtons, 1B-S1.R0: 100-S7.50. 10 other 
breeds, 15-$1.50, 100-$7.50. Free catalog on 
chicks and eggs. Can furnish eggs In 500 and 
1000 lota. Get my prices. Mid-Oak Poultry 
Farm, B. '4. Box 800. Bloomlnstcm, HI. 3-3 



j BREEDER'S CARDS | 

o o 

SEVERAL VARIETIES 

HARRY SWINBURNE, DELHI, IOWA 0F- 

fers 137 varieties poultry, pheasants, ducks, 
geese, eggs. 3-4 

FOR SALE — Houdan eggs $3.00 per 15. Bearded 
Golden Polish $4.00 per 15 eggs. Mrs. Theo 
Sutphen, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, Box 250. 

3-3 

EGGS — Brahmas, Langshans, Rocks, Reds, Orp- 
ingtons, Wydts., $1.50 per 15 prep'd. Ducks, 
geese. Catalogue free. M. H. Myers, Edom, Va. 

3-4 

60 VARIETIES— Prize winning Geese, Ducks, 
Turkeys, Chickens, Stock, Eggs, cheap. F. 
Damann, Fannington, Minn. 2-4 

FANCY POULTRY FOR SALE— 30 Varieties 
catalogue free. Herman Blumer, Berger, Mis- 
souri. 12-6 

TURKEYS 



EGGS FROM HIGH CLASS OLD STOCK— Mam- 
otli White Holland, Mamoth Bronze and Bour- 
bon Red. Ten $8.00; Twenty $15.00; Thirty 
S19.00. Mrs. Frank Spurling, Forest Park, III. 

5-4 

BRONZE GOBBLERS $10— Eggs 10 for $6.00, 
prepaid. Order now. Aaron J. Felthouse, 
Goshen, Ind. 2-6 

GOLDEN LACED WYANDOTTES 

GOLDENS — Winners, layers. Eggs 7c up. An- 
drew DeSmidt, Racine, Wis., Route 4K. 

SIEVED LACED WYANDOTTES 



SILVER LACED WYANDOTTE BABY CHICKS, 

High quality. Reasonable prices. Catalogue 
Free. South Kenton Poultry Farm, Kenton, 
Ohio. 

SILVED LACED WYANDOTTE EGGS— 15-$1.50 
prepaid. E. A. York, McNabb, 111. 3-3 

CERNEY'S FAMOUS SILVER LACED WYAN- 

dottes— Eggs 15-$1.50, 100-$8.00 prepaid. John 
Cerney, Cobden, HI. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES 



EGGS — From White Wyandottes that stay white. 
$2.00 per 15: $4.00 per 50. Clay Hill Poultry 
Farm, Fulton. Iowa. 5-2 

WHITE WYANDOTTES— 255 egg strain. Won 
six first 1922. Prices low. Circular free. Nick 
Fleck, Plymouth, Indiana. 4-2 

POULTRY SHOW 

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN SHOW— Buyer's 
Guide (list of exhibitors) free. Official Marked 
Catalog 75 cents. Both books very valuable. 
Send for them. Address D. Lincoln Orr, Sec'y, 
Box 23, Orr's Mills— Cornwall, N. Y. 

POULTRY REMEDIES 

DORAN'S GAPE REMEDY CURES GAPES OR 

money back. 25c post paid. W. H. Doran, 
Brandenburg, Ky. 2-4 

REAL ESTATE 

WANT TO HEAR FROM OWNER HAVING 

poultry farm or other property for sale. State 
cash price and particulars. John J. Black, 
278th St.. Chippewa Falls. Wis. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

SQUABS $13 PER DOZEN IN N. Y. MARKET. 

Pay better than poultry. The Standard Squab 
book. Most complete up-to-date and practical 
Pigeon and Squab raising book ever published. 
Over 400 pages. 200 illustrations. Cloth $2, 
post paid. Rabbit, Milk Goat and Beekeeping 
books, free circular. V. M. Couch, Ithaca, N. Y. 

PRINTING 

250 ENVELOPES. $1.10; 500-$1.75, POSTPAID. 

Womble Press, Bearcreok, N. C. 5-2 

BETTER POULTRY PRINTING— Prepaid every- 
where for half what others charge. Being 
specialists we Invariably please our 5000 satis- 
fied customers. When disgusted, try us. Every 
order filled under our guaranteed quality ser- 
vice. Latest cuts. Interesting samples, special - 
bargain sheet for stamp. Model Printing Com- 
rony, Manchester. Iowa. 8-13 






Do they seem to be 
all appetite? 

HELP them grow! Feedfthem right! Give 
them a variety of goolty palatable, easily 
digested proteins. A hard gtfain mixture is not 
sufficient and makes you pav too much for the 
slow resulting gains in weight. To develop 
young chicks quickly, safelyl-and cheaply, feed 
GLOBE CHICK MASH witlfbried Buttermilk. 

Every element in this balanced mash is in- 
cluded for a special purpose determined by 
extensive experiments on our poultry farm — on 
our chicks, not on yours. GLOBE CHICK 
MASH is easily digested and readily assimilated. 
The quality is always dependable. 

GLOBE CHICK SCRATCH scattered in the litter 
gives chicks the exercise they must have to keep healthy 
and to stimulate their appetites. 

DICKINSON'S 

obe Chick Mash 

WITH DRIED BUTTERMILK 

Now they are started — keep them growing 

Feed vour growing young birds |n GLOBE 
GROWING MASH. It builds them- up at low 
cost. Improper feeding now may set your flock 
back several weeks and keep you fsom getting 
top prices for your broilers and fryefs. 

GLOBE GROWING MASH will clWelop your 
cockerels for market and your pullets for early 
egg production without the slightest injury to 
vitality. It promotes thrifty growth. 

Insist upon getting GLOBE POULTRY FEEDS for 
every stage from baby chicks to heavy-laying hens. 
Your dealer has them or can get them quickly, 

THE ALBERT DICKINSON CO. 
CHICAGO 

Minneapolis Buffalo Pittsburgh New York 






Boston 



Baltimore 



?HE ALBERT DICKINSON CO. 

CHifAr.n. ill- _ 
- B , GUARANTEED ANALYSIS 
■CRUDE PROTEIN 
, - ' F AT 

^HYDRATES 



8% 
50* 



*■ Z% CALCIUM CABeO"" 



Let The Hens Laij 

More 

Remove The Lice and Tneij Will 



IT IS the healthy hen that lays a good egg and lays it regularly. Hens full 
of vitality and vigor can keep up a heavy egg production. Hens free from 
lice and mites — they put money in your pocket. A hen worried to death with lice cannot 
lay if she wants to. Feeding high priced feed to lousy chickens is a dead loss. Don't do it. 
Use the new way to kill lice and use LICECIL. No dusting, no dipping, no painting. Hang 
up the original open bottle. It acts like magic. It will help to put a few drops in nests 
and on roosts. Then uncork the bottle, hang it up in coop or hen house and the powerful 
evaporating vapors which leave the bottle will do the rest. 





m 



X/7/s L/ce 



Protect your fowls from the powerful and insidious 
lice and mites that suck the life blood of your birds. 
These parasites allowed to run rampant in a hen 
house will suck more blood, more vitality every night 
than fowls can replace by the assimilation of large 
quantities of food during the day. This is a money- 
making and a money-saving proposition. Think it over. Extra care must 
betaken that not only the birds are kept clean, but every crack and crevice 
should be purified as well. Use LICECIL as indicated and in a few days 
your entire flock and hen house will be rid of every louse and mite. 

How to use LICECIL 

Simply put a few drops in the nest and on the roosts, hang the uncovered 
bottle in coop or hen house. The powerful evaporating vapors which leave 
the bottle descending in mist form penetrate feathers, cracks, crevices 
j everywhere. Lice, mites, chiggers, roaches, bed bugs, ants, etc., have no 
lungs. They breathe through the pores of the body and are destroyed 
by LICECIL vapors. Will not injure chicks. Testimonials from 
every State int he Union tell of wonderful results from its use. 

Give it a Fair Trial 

If you prefer to fight poultry pests in the old way— it Is cer- 
tainly your privilege to do so. But your own best interest, 
^and the success others are having, will lead you to give 
LICECILafair, honest trial at the earliestopportunity. 

1 Bottle, $1.00 — 3 Bottles $2.50 
12 Bottles $9.00 — All Postpaid 

AMERICAN SUPPLY CO. 
DEPT. P. K. 

Quincy, Illinois 



Evidence ! 

American Supply Co., 
Quincy, IU., 
Dear Sirs: 

Enclosed please find $2.50 for 3 
bottles of the Licecil. With great 
success I have used it and am more 
than pleased with it. 

I have no more trouble with lice. 
It is the first thing I have got that 
I could and would gladly recommend 
it to any person. 

MBS. P. L. KARNS, 

Riverside Dr. 



Madrid, Nebr., Mar. 15, 1922. 
American Supply Co., 
Quincy, 111. 
Dear Sirs: 

Find enclosed check for four dol- 
lars ($4.00) for which send me one 
gallon of Licecil. 

I used 3 bottles of Licecil last 
summer, and think it is the best louse 
and mite killer I ever us-'d. 
Yours truly, 

EMIL BENSON, 
R. F. D. No. 2. Madrid, Nebr. 




Chicken Mites Filled 
With the Life Blood THE END 
of Fahhful Hens. " 






THE 




A J OURNAL FOR 
EVERYONE. 
I KITERESTE.D 



KEEPER 



N MAKING 
POULTRY 
PAY 



Vol. XXXIX 



JUNE, 1922 



No. 3 



Marketing Eggs by Parcel Post 



There are many who are so lo- 
cated that they simply cannot afford 
to sell their eggs to the corner 
grocery and let him deal them out 
and make a profit of from two to 
five cents on each dozen. Where 
one has to take out in trade, the 
price of the eggs, he often buys 
things which he does not need or 
want and he would be money ahead 
in every way if he were to sell the 
eggs direct to the consumer. This 
is a regular bug-bear with some but 
with most wide awake breeders they 
find that after they once get a trade 
worked up that it is money in their 
pocket. If you are so placed that 
you have a large supply of eggs and 
cannot get a decent price otherwise 
— then try out marketing them by 
parcel post, direct to the consumer. 
We really believe that you will find 
this method so satisfactory that you 
will never consider going back to the 
old plan. 

We all know that good breeding 
and proper feeding are essential if 
we are to get the maximum of eggs 
from our flock. That conclusion was 
reached a long time ago and we have 
been studying how to reach this goal 
of perfection in breeding and feeding. 
Suppose we do get a large supply of 
eggs. Unless our marketing of these 
eggs is right we will find the profits 
on the wrong side of the ledger. Good 
marketing is fully as important as 
good breeding. We must not only 
know how to market but we must be 
able to really sell our product to the 
very best advantage. To some poul- 
trymen the margin of difference may 
be slight but even this may be the 
difference between success and fail- 
ure. Usually the margin of gain is 
by far greater when eggs are shipped 
by parcel post and that is the main 
reason for doing it. In large con- 
cerns they watch every fraction of 
profit and nothing is lost which it 
is able to save. Being so well man- 
aged they are able to sell on a small 
margin, make money and yet give 
their customers a first class article. 
So it should be with the commercial 
egg farm. The poultryman should 



By F. RAYMOND BENSON 

watch every nook and corner for 
profits and let not one jot escape his 
Watchful eye. Make everything 
count. 

The commercial egg farmer should 
really live within fifty or one hun- 
dred miles of his market. This is 
not absolutely imperative but if he 
has this advantage he will find as 
the years pass that it has a real foun- 
dation in fact. Being close to his 
customers he can get the eggs to 
them while they are still fresh. This 
is an important item. Eggs may be 
shipped the same day they are laid 
if it seems best. This would give 
one an excellent argument. Then 
the cost of transportation would be 
extremely low if one lived but fifty 
miles from the market. 

There is absolutely no excuse for 
selling just a common fresh egg by 
parcel post. There is neither money 
in it or any satisfaction from carry- 
ing on such a business. If you are 
going to sell eggs by parcel post you 
should make up your mind to sell 
the very highest grade eggs which 
your skill will enable you to pro- 
duce. The quality should be far 
above the average egg. Have your 
eggs so good that the difference will 
be noticable. It follows that with 
such high quality you will expect, a 
high price for your eggs. In fact 
you must insist that they are worth 
it and demand a good price for your 
product. You should cater to the 
customer who wants a high grade 
article and can afford to pay for it. 
If he can afford to pay for it you 
can afford to take the necessary ex- 
tra care to see that he gets what he 
is willing to pay for. It will cost 
more to produce extra grade eggs. 
The fowls must be kept in clean 
houses. This requires better houses 
and more labor to keep them clean 
and sanitary. The fowls must also 
be fed clean, hard, sweet grain. 
Greater care must be taken to see 
that nothing shall enter into the ra- 
tion which will affect the flavor of 
the eggs to their detriment, such as 
onions or garlic. Sometimes one is 
tempted to buy some second grade 



feed because of the saving but in 
the end it will be found by far the 
best rule to buy good grain no mat- 
ter what the price. You simply can- 
not produce high grade eggs from 
second grade feeds. The eggs should 
be laid in clean nests and never ship 
an egg which is stained or discolored 
in any way. Often such eggs may 
be washed but sometimes the dis- 
coloration will not come out and the 
only thing to do is to use the eggs 
at home. You should not have many 
such eggs but in case you do it might 
be possible to dispose of them to 
bakers at reduced prices. Excelsior 
sometimes stains eggs and we have 
found that clean straw is about the 
best nest material after all. Change 
it often enough so that it may al- 
ways be clean and fresh. Eggs should 
be gathered at least twice a day and 
usually four times a day is better. 
During cold weather they must not 
be allowed to freeze and in the heat 
of summer they will start to incu- 
bate very soon if left for any length 
of time. After gathering them take 
them to the basement and grade 
them. Always ship as soon as pos- 
sible. Many customers demand a 
large egg and see to it that all eggs 
are of the same size and color. Eggs 
of different colored shells make a 
very unattractive appearance and al- 
most all poultrymen have learned 
the advantage of sorting eggs for 
color. Usually it would be well to 
candle them to make sure that they 
are alright and pack carefully so 
that they may reach the customer 
not later than the second day after 
they are laid. Customers who are 
willing to pay a good price for eggs 
usually know what good quality is 
and require that the eggs. must be 
delivered before they have an oppor- 
tunity to become stale. The sooner 
they can be shipped after being laid 
the better. 

The true egg farmer will have 
pride in the quality of his product. 
He will use diligence to see that 
nothing leaves his farm which is not 
strictly in accord with his rules and 
(Continued on Page 10) 



Page Number 4 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



POULTRY KEEPER 

Qulncy, Illinois 
401 Hampshire Street 
A Journal for Everyone Interested in Making 
Poultry Pay. 
Issued the First of Each Month 

Subscription Price : 
50c a year; Single Copies, 5c 
Foreign Postage: Twenty-five Cents a Year 
Additional. 

Entered at the Qulncy, 111., Post Office as 
Second Class Matter. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Money 
Order, Express Order or Registered Letters. 
Small sums will be accepted in United States 
one or two cent postage stamps. 

Change of address — When this Is desired, be 
sure to give old and new Post Office addresses. 

All subscribtions invariably discontinued at 
expiration. Subscribers will confer a favor by 
reporting to us irregularities in receiving the 
Poultry Keeper. 

Advertising rates made known on application. 

Poultry Keeper readers are cordially Invited 
to express their opinion on any subject of 
poultry that will be of Interest to our readers, 
give helpful talks to the inexperienced and ask 
questions in any department. 

A. OTIS ARNOLD, Editor. 

F. RAYMOND BENSON, Ass't Editor. 



PtJ5^ American Poultry Association 



PRODUCE INFERTILE EGGS 
IN SUMMER 



The farmer looses a tidy sum each 
summer by way of spoiled eggs. Per- 
haps if he actually knew just how 
this came about he might be more 
willing to remedy the matter. 

What causes an egg to rot? 

In each fertile egg there is the 
germ - of life in a dormant state. 
When the temperature of the egg is 
raised to 95 degrees, incubation 
starts and the germ begins to devel- 
ope. When the temperature later 
falls below 95 degrees for any 
length of time, the germ dies. It 
becomes a dead embroye. The pro- 
cessess of putrefaction set in or in 
other words, it rots. One hot sum- 
mer day will start incubation or a 
hen setting twelve hours will give 
the same results. Unless such eggs 
are used immediately they will be- 
come unfit for human consumption. 

The remedy appears to be simply 
in not allowing the eggs to become 
overheated. This is easily said but 
the farmer knows that it is almost 
an impossibility. 

The next solution is to produce 
eggs in which the germ is absent or 
in other words, infertile eggs. After 
the breeding season no male is need- 
ed and his presence is a detriment 
to the eggs produced. Dispose of the 
rooster and produce eggs which will 
keep, during the hot weather. 

DOES IT PAY TO BUY 
PULLETS 



Each year many breeders advertise 
pullets of two to three months, for 
sale. A question which confronts 
many is whether it really pays to buy 
such pullets or to raise them at 
home. 

There are two view points in this 
matter. Let us suppose you wish 
pullets for early fall and winter lay- 
ing. Perhaps you do not care much 



as to the exhibition qualities of the 
fowls but you wish healthy, quick 
maturing layers. If such be your 
demands and you are handicapped for 
facilities or time to raise them, then 
the pullets can be purchased from 
some large grower who has large 
range and makes a specialty of this 
business of starting pullets. Perhaps 
such a pullet producer may have 
such excellent facilities that he may 
be able to produce and sell these 
pullets for less than you could raise 
them. If you can buy them for less 
than you can raise them it is to your 
advantage to buy them. 

Should you aspire to a show record 
you will hardly want to buy pullets 
from the commercial grower. He can- 
not give sufficient time to the mating 
of his fowls to assure you of quality 
which would warrant showing. We 
believe the person who wishes to win 
the blue will continue to raise his 
own pullets. 

The commercial pullet grower is 
coming to the front. He is a special- 
ist and as such can do his work bet- 
ter and cheaper than the average 
poultryman. This line will make a 
fine opportunity for one to try his 
ability. 



IT PAYS TO READ 



Those who are priviledged to know 
successful poultrymen — the men who 
do business on a large scale, will tell 
you that one of the fundamental re- 
quirements is a knowledge of the 
poultry industry as viewed by our 
Experiment Stations and leading au- 
thorities. In other words it is nec- 
essary to study and keep abreast 
with conditions as they present them- 
selves. 

Every poultryman should own and 
read the best books he can secure. 
It is a lamentable fact that very few 
of our public libraries have suitable 
books on the subject of poultry. This 
is largely due to the fact that those 
who purchase the books are ignorant 
of the needs of the poultryman. Each 
poultryman must buy his own books 
and it is well to obtain the assistance 
of some experienced poultryman to 
aid in their selection. Some feel that 
they cannot afford to put a lot of 
money in books but we strongly 
recommend that they purchase one 
or two books each year and not try 
to buy a whole library at once. A 
few dollars spent in this manner will 
bring the biggest dividends you ever 
had and you will find your interests 
growing constantly. 

In choosing your reading matter 
do not loose sight of the poultry 
journals. They give you the best in- 
formation obtainable. It is given in 
consise form and boiled down. One 
of the greatest advantages of the 
poultry journals is that they give you 
advance information. More than one 
poultryman has been successful be- 
cause he was the constant reader of 
a good poultry journal. 

The advantage of the Question and 
Answer Department such as is found 
in POULTRY KEEPER is of untold 
value to breeders. It gives the best 
and most reliable information to any 
reader on any subject pertaining to 
poultry. 

Remember that you can buy in- 



formation cheaper than you can gain 
it by the hard road of experience. 



YES SIR, THEY NEED SHADE 



Last summer we dropped in to see 
a friend who had some chicks which 
were not doing well. "Lack of 
shade," we told him. We saw a 
sneer come over his face. "But it 
isn't that hot," he replied. 

Just then a tire on his car which 
had been standing close by, blowed 
up with a report which startled both 
of us. 

He looked at the tire, then at us. 
Not a word was said but the explo- 
sion of that tire convinced him that 
it "was that hot." 

When the sun is beating down hot 
and you realize that summer is here 
in dead earnest, don't forget that 
your chicks need protection or some 
day you will realize that your little 
fellows are not doing well. Put 
yourself in the place of your chicks 
and see how you would like to stay 
out in the boiling sun all day. 
. Feed sacks can be stretched in 
such a manner so that shade can be 
provided. Sunflowers help or even 
corn will make shade. Almost any 
kind of bush will help or if you want 
to plant trees, the most popular is 
the plum tree. 

Protection from the sun is neces- 
sary during the summer and the ol- 
der fowls will enjoy it fully as much 
as the chicks. 



A VACATION HELPS 



We have seen men who did not be- 
lieve in vacations. They kept plug- 
ging away and then one day the 
break came and — well maybe the un- 
dertaker got a job. 

We believe in work. It is better 
than a tonic and it keeps the world 
moving but we all need to relax 
once in awhile. Some people take 
too many vacations. Some try to 
make life a continuous vacation. It 
is best not to go to extremes but 
one feels tired, take a day off and 
gc-t things out of your system. Often 
farmers, who have boys of their own, 
make a mistake in keeping them on 
the job continually. Give them a day 
off now and then and let them know 
that you expect them to enjoy the 
rest, but of course do not encourage 
them to have the wrong attitude 
towards it. 

Work on a poultry farm is espec- 
ially trying and every poultryman 
should plan a vacation occasionally. 
A pouitryman must do the same work 
day after day. He gets little variety 
and the sameness causes fatigue. 

Try giving the men a vacation now 
end then and see if they do not do 
better work, more of it and with a 
better spirit. Remember that you 
are entitled to a vacation as much as 
anyone. The boss needs a rest along 
with the rest of the workers. A 
tired body or mind will not work as 
well as one that is fresh and full of 
pep. 



A GOOD DOG NECESSARY 



We picked up the daily paper to- 
day and learn that a poultryman west 
of town lost 35 pullets and 5 cock- 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 5 



rerels in one night. Someone broke 
into the poultry house and helped 
Themselves to the fowls. This is be- 
ing duplicated all over the land and 
could be prevented to a large extent 
by using due precaution. 

There are many methods of lock- 
ing the poultry coop and some use 
electric bells to inform them of the 
presence of chicken thieves. All 
these schemes are useful and find 
their uses but one of the best and 
most reliable alarms is a good watch 
dog. 

There are good dogs, indifferent 
dogs and curs. If you are so unfor- 
tunate as to own a cur — well you 
will not be a very enthusiastic sup- 
porter of the dog. Buy a good dog 
and train him properly and you may 
rest assured that no one will attempt 
to rob your chicken coop. We pre- 
fer giving the dog his freedom. Let 
him have his run so in case anyone 
does come around he can get at them. 

Personally we very much admire 
a fine dog but we warn our readers 
not to be influenced by stories which 
run in popular magazines. These 
stories may be good reading but may 
not be founded on fact. No one 
breed is superior. All have their 
good points. 



A WATERING SYSTEM 
SAVES LABOR 



A few weeks ago the writer broke 
away from his labors, (you see we 
take a vacation once in awhile) and 
run out to visit a nearby commercial 
egg farm. Among the many features 
which attracted our attention was the 
watering system. We spoke to the 
owner of it and he repiled, "If I had 
to run this plant without my present 
watering system, I would quite. I 
simply could not carry water for all 
these birds and give them proper 
care." 

His system was original but has 
proven so useful that we will describe 
it. To start with he has a pressure 
tank in the basement of the resi- 
dence. This tank supplies the house 
with water as well as the poultry 
house. Being piped into each pen a 
faucet is provided which can be 
turned on so that a constant supply 
of water is kept in the drinking dish. 
In case too much water is turned on 
and the dish becomes full, an over- 
flow pipe is provided and the sur- 
plus is carried to a sewer and thus 
away from the house. The cost of 
installation is much reduced when 
one can do the work himself and the 
labor it saves will soon pay for it. 

If you keep quite a number of 
fowls we feel sure that such a sys- 
tem may be used to advantage. If 
the pressure system does not seem 
best a tank may be placed in the 
wind mill tower. The main idea is 
to give the fowls a constant and am- 
ple supply of fresh water with as lit- 
tle labor as possible. 



RHODE ISLAND REDS 
By D. E. Hale 

Experience breeders and becinuers aliVe will 
find the information contained in this instruc- 
tive and beautiful illustrated hoolt worth many 
times the price. Learn from it how to select 
and mate birds for the breedine pen, how to 
feed, judsre and exhibit successfully. 

Fully illustrated, inclndine a fine color plate 
by Sewell, RR pajres. 9 by 12 inches. Price 75c, 
postpaid. Address Poultry Keeper, Quincy, 111. 



Buckeye 



mammoth 
incubator 




A Money-Making 

"Buckeye" Hatch 



In 1919. Mrs. Edward Steinhoff of 
Leon, Kansas, bought four of our 
No. 6 Buckeye Mammoth In- 
cubators, with a capacity of 2,440 
eggs each. A year later she pur- 
chased our 10,368-Egg Buckeye 
Mammoth No. 7. Since that time 
she has installed seven more No. 
7 Buckeyes, giving her a total 
capacity of over 80,000 eggs — 
entirely paid for out of the profits. 

The illustration shows only four 
of her eight Buckeye Mammoths 
and the highly profitable hatch 
she is preparing to ship — a 
typical Buckeye success. 

800 successful hatcheries with capaci- 
ties up to 200, 000 and more, in widely 
different temperatures and atmos- 
pheric conditions from coast to coast 
in the United States and Canada, are 
. proving every week that the Buckeye 
Mammoth is the real business incu- 
bator — bringing forth the highest per- 
centage of strong, vigorous chicks and 
the greatest profits. 

The Buckeye user knows in ad- 
vance, to within one to five per 
cent, just what his hatch will be. 
He knows precisely how he is 
going to take care of his custom- 
ers. And he knows that with 
Buckeye vitality he will not lose 
more than one-half of one per 



cent of chicks in shipping. In 
addition to all this, the Buckeye 
Mammoth requires only about 
one-fourth the room; saves half 
your time and labor; reduces 
both installation and operation 
cost. As a matter of fact, it liter- 
ally takes the uncertainty out 
of the commercial hatchery busi- 
ness. 

We will be glad to send our Buck- 
eye Mammoth Catalog which 
tells all about this remarkable in- 
vention. Let us show you how to 
start small and grow big in the 
commercial hatchery business. 

The Buckeye Incubator Co. 
815 Euclid Ave., Springfield, Ohio 

World's Largest Manufacturers of 
Incubators and Brooders 




Buckeye Mammoths built in three sizes: 
No. 7, Capacity 10, 368 eggs 
No. 8, Capacity 4, 600 eggs 
No. 6, Capacity 2,440 eggs 



Page Number 6 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



265 6>313 Eqqs per Year! 

Record — 
WuHLeqhoms 




Best Laying 

Hen at the big 
Chicago Poultry 
Show December 
1921 this Ferris 
hen won over 
all breeds in 
the egg laying 
class. O n e of 
many Ferris 
National Win- 
ners. 



Lowest 
Prices on 
chicks, eggs, 
pullets.hensand 
males. English or 
Ameriqan type. 
Quick shipment 
No delay. Send 
for catalog 
now 

909-A Union 



at AMAZING 
BARGAINS 

Never before has the 
famous Ferris stock been 
offered at such bargain 
prices! Pedigreed ; trapnest- 
ed; guaranteed! Egg bred 
for 22 years. World's larg- 
est leghorn farms. Write 
for special bargain prices on 
Birds-Eggs and clucks. 

1922 Catalog Free 

Send today for your 
copy of our 1922 Cat- 
alog and Mating List, with 
Special May cut prices. 
Get this catalog and in- 
crease your profits. It's 
Free for the asking. Sim- 
ply send your name and 
address. Write today. 

GEORGE B. FERRIS 

Ave., Grand Rapids, Mich. 



LEG BANDS 

All guaranteed-Any size rs 

ALUMINUM BANDS £ 
with raised figures. z 
price postpaid, 10-15c,,D 
25-25c, 60-35C, 100-60c. 
ECONOMY colored 

celluloid with 





aluminum back. 

Any color, two large black num- 
bers In each band, prices 12-S0c, 
25-oOc, 50-80c, 100-$1.50, 
Makers of 25 different styles of 

of LEG & WING bands. 
The National Poultry Band Co. 
Send for catalog. Newport, Ky. 



prices beat them all. This latest 
le means 
1GGERI 
. "^AVINGSTHANI 
EVER. BUYNOW.J 

r ""direct from factory f 

Freight Prepaid. 160 styles of [ 
Fencing. Gates and Steel Posts, 
jinn Roofing and Paints too. All prices 
slashed. Write me quick for 96-page free book. 
BROWN FENCE & WIRE CO.. Dept. 576 , Cleveland, Ohio 

{ —Pou/tru Fences 






W.G.Olsen, Drumright, Okla. writes: "Fence received 
ana put up. Is better than I expected. Saved S26.40 
on my 880.00 order besides it is much heavier wire. 
We can 6ave you money. Prices 'way down. We Pay 
the Freight and Ship Direct to YOU. 

Write now for Free Catalog. $(f ' y 



vgi> KITSELMAN BROTHERS 
*■>•»<< 229 MUNCIE, INDIAN* 



MILLER'S 

THE OLD RELIABLE ILLINOIS HATCHEEY. 

Select Chicks from Heavy Laying Hens. 

White and Brown Leg- 
horns, 50-$7, 100-$13, 
500-$62.50. Barred Rocks 
and S. C. Reds, 50-$8, 
100-$15, 500-$72.50. W. 
Wyandottes, W. Rocks, 
R. C. Reds, 50-$8.50, 
100 - $16., 500 - $77.50. 
Black Langshan, Buff 
Orpington, Parks Barred 
Rocks, 50-$9, 100-$17, 
500-$82.50. S. C. An- 
conas, 331 Egg Strain, 
50-$9.50, 100-S18, 500-$87.50. Buff Rocks, 50- 
$3.50, 100-$18.00, 500-$87.50. White Orpingtons, 
50-$10.50, 100-$20.00. 100 per cent Live Delivery 
Guaranteed. Prepaid Parcel Post. Order Now 
From This Ad and Save Time. Reference, 
State Bank. Catalogue Free. 
MILLER HATCHERY, Box K, Heyworth, 111. 




I 



"SUCCESSFU 



Moate 



I 9? INCUBATORS 
B- and BROODERS 

eceseful made. Our guaranty, strongest 
ever written, vrould put us out of business if 
they weren't, and we've been at it 29 yeare. 
Poultry lessons FREE. Catalog free. Write now. 

DesMotnestncubilorCi.5652dSt.Dcs Moines 





(Buy e sir n ®m 



Rose or Single Comb? 

1. Does the Single Comb Rhode Island Red 
lay better than the Rose Comb? 

2. How about the Brown Leghorns? Is 
there any difference in the Rose and Single 
Combs? 

H. M., "Wisconsin. 

1. There is not supposed to be 
any difference between the Single 
and Rose Comb but in the far north 
or where it gets real cold in winter 
I believe the Rose Combs would have 
the best of it. We found the Rose 
Comb could resist more cold weather 
and of course you know what hap- 
pens to a frozen comb and the egg 
yield. 

2. The same would apply to the 
Brown Leghorn except that I believe 
the Single Comb has been bred for 
egg production more than the Rose 
Comb. ; 



Scaly Legs Come Back Again 

Will you please tell me the cause of scaly > 
legs on chickens and what to do for it? 

G. G-., Jr., Florida. 

Scaly legs are caused by a small j 
rascal which burrows under the 
scales on the legs of fowls and I be- 
lieve that he gets his first start in 
conditions which are not sanitary 
about the poultry house and yard. 
Clean up everything and spray and 
keep things sanitary. Any fowls 
which show a bad case of scaly legs 
can be helped by washing the legs 
in soap and water. Take a tooth pick 
and clean under the scales. Just 
clean the legs up as good as you 
know how. Then dip the whole shank 
into kerosene being very careful not 
to get any on the skin or feathers. 
We prefer to treat fowls in the 
morning. You may have to treat 
several times but it will stop the 
trouble. After you have it coming 
alright, apply vaseline and keep 
shanks well greased for sometime. 



„ Remedy for Egg Eaters 

Miss E. V. of Maine kindly sends 
the following note for which we wish 
to thank her and we pass it on to 
our readers knowing that they will 
be glad to know a remedy for egg 
eaters. 

"Yours received last eve and please 
accept nsy thanks for your kindness. 
I have a cure for hens that eat eggs, 
Give a little vinegar in the wet mash. 
One feed will stop them." 



Broken Egg in Hen 

We would like your advice as to what causes 
our hens to die. We loose on an average of one 
a month. An egg seems to break in the oviduct 
and the hen dies. We like POULTRY KEEPER 
fine. Lots of advice in it. 

W. P. B., Dlinois. 

A broken egg in a hen will cause 
death usually unless means are taken 
to remove the egg. This can be done 
by injecting sweet of olive oil. Then 
oil the finger and gently remove 
broken shell. This demands care for 
injury will result in death. I pre- 
sume the cause of this is that your 
hens are too fat. Corn should be 
reduced in the ration at this time of 
the year. Sometimes hens lay so 
heavily that'tliey weaken the organs 




F. Raymond Benson 

so that the shell is extremely thin 
or perhaps not enough oyster shell is 
provided to make the shells. 



Tomatoes and Eggs 

1. Please be so kind as to let me know In 
your next issue if ripe tomatoes are harmful 
to egg production. 

2. What causes crooked breasts in my 

roosters? 

J. E. W., New Jersey. 

1. We have fed ripe tomatoes to 
poultry for years and never knew 
that it harmed them in any way. We 
have nothing in our files to indicate 
otherwise. Have any of our readers 
had any experience along this line? 

2.. Lack of bone forming material 
and roosting too young will cause 
this trouble. It is easily remedied. 
Use a wide roost, don't let them go 
to roosting too early and feed plenty 
of bone forming material. Come 
again when you need our help. 



Indigestion and Remedy 

My flock seems to be having trouble with 
indigestion and I wonder if you could give me 
a remedy through the Question and Answer De- 
partment of POULTRY KEEPER? Our whole 
family "enjoys reading your good articles. 

E. B., Illinois. 

Correct ration first and then give 



Guard Your Garden 



Prevention ia better than cure. Keep 
away blight and mildew and destroy 
infect peits with a 

Brown's Auto-Spray 

Our No. 1, shown here, operates by com- 
pressed air. Over 750.000 have been in 
use from 1 to 18 years. Write for free 
Spraying Calendar & New Catalog. 



THE E.C.BROWN CO., g95 Maple 3U Rochester.N.Y, 




STORMONT'S BARRED ROCKS 
— DEFEAT ALL BREEDS 

in First Illinois Laying Contest, by winning 
first pen, first, tliird and fifth highest layers. 
These facts speak volumes for my strain. Write 
for mating list. 

Rev. A. C. Stormont, Auxvasse, Mo. 




mr i'Tee in 



BABY CHICKS 

Bred Right. Hatched 
Right, from Free Range 
Stock of select quality. 
97% Live Delivery Guar- 
anteed by parcel post di- 
rect from hatchery. We 
hatch Barred, White 
Rocks Reds, White, Gold- 
en Wyandottes, White, 
Brown Leghorns, Anconas, 
Broiler Chicks. Write for 
irated Catalog. NEW WASHINO- 
T0N HATCHERY, Dept. K, New Washington, 0. 

Poultry Leg Bands 

Colored Leader Adjustable, fit 
anything from bantam to goose, 
numbered consecutively, Red, Blue, 
Green, Yellow, Pink. 
100, $1.50; 50, $1.00; 25, 60c. 

Heavy Aluminum, numbered 
consecutively, large raised figures, 
millions have been sold, adjustable 
for any size bird, will stay on. 
100, 60c; 50. 35c; 25, 20c. 
Celluloid Spiral, 10 colors, 
Red, Green, Garnet, Black, 
White, Pink, Yellow, Purple, 
light Blue and Dark Blue. 

25 50 100 250 500 
No. 1 Brahmas Giants, etc.. .$.45 $.75 $1.20 $2.75 $S.M 

No.2B.ocka Reds etc .40 .60 1.00 2.25 4.00 

No. 3 Leghorns. Aoconas. etc.. .35 .50 .90 2.00 3-o0 
Prices are postpaid. State color and breed. 

Eureka Supply House Box K, Mount Morris, Hi. 





THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 7 



Baby Chicks 



Baby chicks. 00,000 
weekly. 20 varieties. 
Reduced prices June 
and July. Catalog' free. 



Miller Poultry Farms, Lancaster, Mo. 



Free-ConAeifs Poultry Book 



80 pages chock full of information about the feeding and 
rearing of chicka, calling of hens, etc. Tells how to keep 
chickens healthy and how to make them pay. Whether 
a beginner or a professional. Conkey's Book is worth 
dollnrs to you. Sent for 6 cents in stampp to pay postage. 
THE G- E. CONKEY CO. 6542 Broadway. Cleveland, Ohio 



Get Prices on Old Trusty 
Incubators and Brooders. 

Nearly a million in use. Quick 
shipment. Low prices. Free 
catalog to any address on re- 
quest. M.M.JOHNSON CO. 
Clay Center, Nebraska 




Shipment g§ Freight 



Chick Bands 

latest, best, can't 
cut legs, green, yel- 
low, black, white, 
red, blue, 100-95c, 
Adult spirals 100-95c 
LIBERTY BAND CO 




Box E, Belleville, 111. 



Royal Strain 



BUFF ORPINGTONS 

15 hens and 3 cockerels for sale. Hens 3 

and 5 dollars, cockerels 5 and 10 dollars. 

Eggs half, price, 75c, $1.50, $2.50 per 15. 
Order from this ad. 

K. W. HTJEHNE 
211 South 10th St. Quincy, Illinois 



Poultry Necessities 

PRATTS POULTRY REGULATOR 
PRATTS LICE KILLERS 
PRATTS POULTRY DISINFECTANT 
PRATTS POULTRY REMEDIES 

'Your Money Back If You Are Not 
Satisfied" 

Dealers Everywhere 

PRATT FOOD COMPANY 



CHICKS WITH PEP 

BIG JUNE AND JULY PRICE REDUCTION 

Try some of our June and July 
full-blooded DON'T STOPLAYING 
KIND of Chicks. They will pay 
you big. Rocks, Reds, Anconas, 
Minorcas, W. Wyandottes, 14c; 
Leghorns 12c, Orpingtons and Sil- 
ver Wyandottes, lGc: Broilers 10c. 
2c less for July. 5% off on 500 
and 10% on 1000 lots. Free cata- 
log. Prepaid. Safe arrival. 
Holgato Chick Hatchery, Box K, Holgate, Ohio. 



SUPERIOR LEG BANDS 





Aluminum 
Sure Clinch 



Spiral * 
Celluloid 



12-5 .15 12 - S .15 
25 - .25 25 - .30 
50 - .35 50 - .50 
100 - .65 100 - .95 
250 - 1.50 250 - 2.00 
500 - 2.50 500 - 3.25 
Also, colored number bands. Baby 
chick bands. State breed and sex. Postpaid. Cat. iree. 

AURORA BAND CO. 79 LaSalle St., AURORA, ILL. 



Healthy Flock Guaranteed 

Let me show you how to cure White 
Diarrhea, Roup, Cholera and other di- 
seases — how to raise big broilers, fertile 
roosters and get LOTS of EGGS. 

I lost 3800 chickens in 3 weeks, when 
the "OCULUM" man showed me — How. 

"OCULUM" is a scientific HARMLESS 
Liquid Germicide — In 13 years it has 
created CONFIDENCE and made Poultry 
raising PROFITABLE — Journals, Experi- 
ment Stations and this Journal PRAISE 
it. Hawkins, Fishel and other fanciers 
love it. 

A sample 10c enough for 150 feeds. 
Each 50th sample order gets .$1 bottle 
FREE — each 25th 50c order gets a pint 
— $2 FREE. Each 15th $1 order gets a 
guart— $4 FREE— Postage paid. 
TEX "OCULUM" CO., Box S, Salem, Va. 

GUARANTEED. 
Dealers Handle AGENTS Wanted 



charcoal in hopper so that fowls may 
have all that they need. We think 
charcoal a great help in keeping the 
digestive machine in good order. If 
constipation is present a half tea- 
spoonful of Epsom salts in water will 
remedy. This dose is for each fowl. 
No doubt your ration is sadly at fault 
and perhaps you are over feeding. 



How Long to Hatch 

Will you kindly tell us through the POULTRY 
KEEPER just how long a hen has to set before 
she hatches ? You see we are quite green in 
the chicken business. 

A. D. L., Iowa. 

It takes three weeks to incubate 
chicken eggs. Sometimes they will 
hatch the 19th or 20th day but that 
is only a sign that the hen set well 
and the eggs were strongly fertile. 
Weak germed eggs may run over a 
day. Drop us a line on any question 
and we will help you out. You are 
a beginner and not green at all. We 
all have to learn sometime. Come 
again. 



Several Questions 

1. If it is necessary to air eggs why is it 
that if j r ou feed a sitting hen on the nest she 
will not come off? 

2. Why is it that pigeons who do not cover 
their eggs, take turns, the male and female 
covering the eggs? 

3. If necessary to air, why do geese bury 
their eggs when they leave the nest? 

4. If necessary to air why is it that the 
hen which spends the least time off the nest, 
makes the best hatch? 

5. Why should the young of poultry be aired 
any more than the young of beast? 

6. Why is it that one hen builds her nest 
under a barn in the damp and another in the 
gabel of a barn and' both bring off equally 
good hatches? 

7. Last spring I had two machines of the 
same principle and in one I sprinkled the eggs 
while the other I did not, yet the hatch was 
about the same. 

8. A. man -told me a Kantam. hen which 
stole her nest in the boiler room and laid near 
the boiler. The lien being killed and the eggs 
being in a place where they could not get them 
they were left and soon hatched out five chicks. 
Whv is this if the eggs need much turning-? 

L. C. L., Ohio. 

1. If you let nature take its course 
the hen will get off and eat. If you 
entice her to stay on the nest by 
feeding her while she is on the nest 
you are aborting nature's plans. 

2. The pigeon may be called a 
fowl of the air while the hen is dif- 
ferent. Many birds take turns in set- 
ting on the eggs. Perhaps the roost- 
er did in its wild jungle state, of 
that we cannot say, but certain it is 
he would have a busy time if he tried 
to do so under present conditions. 

3. Any fowl which covers up the 
eggs while it leaves the nest does so 
more for protection than from the 
desire to keep the eggs warm or not 
wanting to air them. 

4. It is not true the hen which 
spends the least time off the nest 
brings forth the best hatch. Much 
depends on the eggs, weather and 
general conditions so that we have 
seen a hen hatch well which seemed 
to be shirking the task before her. 

5. I do not know that we have 
advocated that the chicks be aired 
as you call it. We advocate fresh air 
as a healthful proposition. It is not 
fair to compare a fowl and a beast, 
they belong to different families. 

6. Again we do not believe that 
this is a fair statement. The hen 
which builds her nest on the ground 
will usually hatch the best but one 
must take into consideration the gen- 
eral conditions. In damp weather 
the hen in the hay mow might hatch 
well while in dry weather she might 
not. 



Dr. David Roberts 
Poultry Tablets 

A combination of sulphocarbolates of 
calcium, sodium and zinc for the treat- 
ment and prevention of White Diar- 
rhea and all intestinal infections of 
baby chicks, as well as poultry in all 
stages of life and productivity. Drink- 
ing water for poultry should be medi- 
cated to overcome and prevent disease. 
Tie annual pouliry loss by disease is 
stupecdous---over 50 per cent. 

Save Your Chicks 

Serve in fresh water. Aids digestion. 
Permits food to nourish them through 
their babyhood, the non-productive 
period when hardy bone and strong 
muscle is needed to give them a good 
start in their race for the laying period. 
They will reward you manyfold later 
on. Give them proper protection and 
you will find there is big money in 
poultry. Sold in tablet form. 

50 Tablets 50 Cents 

Poultry will drink when too sick toeat. 
Baby chick organs are peculiarly sensi- 
tive. They need something to ward off 
disease, particularly that most dreaded 
and destructive disease white diarrhea. 

A Tablet A Day 
Keeps Disease Away 

One package, 50 tablets, enough to 
medicate 50 gallons of water, a most 
efrectiveand economical preventive, for 
only one cent a gallon. Use Dr. 
David Roberts Poultry Tonic, Louse 
Powder, Poultry Cholera Medicine, 
Poultry Roup Paste and Disinfectall, 
all known and tried prescriptions. 
Sold by our druggist, dealer, or direct. 

Dr. David Roberts Practical Home Veteri- 
narian, a veterinary doctor book, regular price 
$1 .00, tells you how to treat your own poul- 
try, also describes our 44 prescriptions — a 
prescription for every animal ailment. We // 
will tell you how to get it FREE. 

Our Special Introductory It 

Offer Senc * 2 5 cents, just one half the IL. 

regular price, for one package Dr. \W 
David Roberts Poultry Tablets, sent /* 
you postpaid, providing you give us 
the name of your druggist or dealer. 

DR. DAVID ROBERTS | 
VETERINARY CO. 

135 Grand St., Waukesha, Wis. , 



Drinking 
To Their 

Health 



Page Number 8 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



SELL YOUR 
EGGS NOW 



Put Them Down In K. & G. Egg Pre- 
servative. Get High Winter Prices 
for Cheap Summer Eggs 

Why sell egfrs for onlj 20c a dozen or less? 
Preserve them now in K. & G. Next winter, 
when eggs are 60o a dozen or more, you will 
have plenty of eggs to eat ana to sell. Fresh, 
new-laid eggs put down in K. & G. remain 
fresh a whole year, and come out of the so- 
lution just like new-laid eggs. 

KO r The PERFECT EGG 
• * 



ICY, ILL. vj 



The "OLD RELIABLE" 




W E A RE 
PIONEERS 



Ohio Hatchery. 

In the business of Hatching and Selling Chicks. For 22 Years we 
have been furnishing the public with High Class Chicks which have 
pr -veil So Satisfactory that 00 per cent of our business is now from 
old customers. Uhl Hatchery Chicks are produced from select, heavy 
hiving liens on free range and are strong and vigorous. 

Reasonable Reduced Pi-ices for June. 

By Prepaid Parcel Post.. Leading Varieties. Oct our 1922 Catalog. 

The Uhl Hatchery, Box K , New Washington, Ohio 



2 Sy-fon Chick Fountains 
and 1 Chick Feeder $ 1H 



Biggest Value Ever Offered 

Sy-fon Fountain-safest, most 



sanitary, most convenient to 
use. Fits any mason jar. 
Doesn't screw on; fastens 
to inside with brass spring 
prongs. Easily attached in 
two seconds. Only Sy-fon 
Chick Fountain on market. 
Two holes in bottom — yet 
doesn't leak — admit oxygen 
constantly so water is always 
fresh. Same water level always 
maintained. Nothing io get out 
of order— no thin cr to break. 20 
c nts each; 3 for SO cents; 
6 for $1.00. Postpaid. 

Columbus Chick Feeder 

two compartment) 
es smooth 

Combination Offers \ 

2 Fountains, 1-11 inch 

Feeder, $1.00. 
4 Fountains, 1-20 inch 

Feeder, 51.50. ^Ix" injure chicks; 

m ww r» - • * close together, can t 

All Prices Postpaid scratch out feed. Removable top- 
Order direct from this Easily cleaned -Made, ■>f>alvan- 
ad at these money saving ^ SS'tay** ° ° Fe * dCr 
prices. It will pay you to n inch ^ 75c 2 for njsSm 
send your order today. 20 inch size, $1.00, 2 for 51.85. 

The Better Products Co* 
9 1 8 Broadway St., Columbus, Wis. 





CHIC K. S 

Hatched fioin pure tired se- 
lected heavy laying hens on 
free range and kept under 
proper conditions. The lead- 
ing popular varieties sent you 
right from the Incubator safe- 
ly hy prepaid parcel post any- 
where and 100% live ar- 
rival guaranteed. We have 
been at It thirteen years. 
Write at once for our FREE 
ILLUSTRATED CATALOG 
describing our farm and eon- 
much Information that will prove of 
to you. 

WECKEL BEOS. , Box S91K, Molina. Illinoit. 




Wants Chick Feed 

1. Will you please tell me how to mix a 
good chick feed? I know you like the com- 
mercial feed the best but they want almost 
S4.00 per 100 pounds. 

'2. How many hens should I have with one 
rooster ? 

3. Are pullet eggs or two year old Jien eggs 
the best for hatching ? 

G. H. G. 

1. Sorry you did not give your 
state so we could tell more what kind 
of a ration you need. As it is we 
can only guess. We will give you the 
New Jersey Ration. For scratch 
they suggest fine cracked corn 4 0 
pounds and rolled oats 20 pounds. 
For a dry mash, wheat bran 50 
pounds, gluten feed 10 pounds, corn 
meal 10 pounds, ground oats 10 
pounds, meat scrap 10 pounds and 
granulated bone 10 pounds. Of course 
grit, charcoal and water will be be- 
fore them at all times. 

2. You did not mention the breed 
you keep so we cannot help you. 

3. We prefer the eggs from two 
year old breeders as they are more 
apt to be fertile and hatch stronger 
chicks. 



White Campines 

What arc the White Campines like. I never 
saw anv. 

E. J. R., New York. 

Personally I think they are just 
about White Leghorns and I doubt if 
they ever get into the Standard. 



Cabbage for Poultry 

Do you believe in feeding cabbage to poultry? 

P. I*. J., niinois. 

Cabbage makes an excellent feed 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 9 



SUCRENE 

BUTTERMILK 
FEEDS for 
POULTRY 



Send 

for this 
Free Book 




Rich in vita, 
mines that 
build vigor, 
stamina and 
louble egg 
production. 
These two butter, 
lilk feeds are mak. 
ing money for poultry 
men. 

Sucrene Butter- 
milk Egg Mash puts hens 
in excellentlaying condition 
and enables them to main- 
tain a super egg production 
at all seasons. Sucrene 
Buttermilk Chick Mash 
helps raise the greatest possible number of chicks, 
eliminates all chances of bowel trouble and develops 
pullets rapidly to early laying maturity. 
In addition to offering the poultry world these two 
money making feeds, we have also produced a real 
book — "For Better Poultry." Written by a prominent 

Eoultry expert, it gives unbiased facts on breeds, 
ouses, incubating and brooding. Describes diseases 
and tells how to avoid them. Tells how to feed for 
heaviest egg production and to raise the most chicks 
from every hatch. Sent absolutely FREE POSTPAID 
to boni-fide poultry raisers on request. 

Write for it today. No charge 
AMERICAN MILLING CO., Dept. IS Peoria, DL 



for poultry and we would feed it 
quite extensively but it is so high to 
buy and we do not have the room 
to grow it. If you can produce it 
yourself we believe it would be well 
to put some away for winter use. 



Trapnest in Spring 

Would it be of any value for me to trap- 
nest my fowls in the early spring? 

A. A. K. , AVisconsin. 

If you could trapnest during the 
winter and early spring you could lo- 
cate the hens which were winter pro- 
ducers and it would be a good plan 
to use them as breeders. We do not 
believe in using the non-producers in 
the breeding pens. 



How Long to Pei-fect Strain 



i 



advertises the 



Ktrain and I personally know that he has only 
been a breeder for three years. How can he 
advertise this way. How long does it take to 
perfect a Strain? 

B. H. F., Illinois. 

I saw this same ad and wondered 
at it for I too knew the advertiser 
had not been breeding poultry over 
three years. A strain cannot be pro- 
duced in a day. It takes years to 
stamp certain features upon the 
breeding stock so that they will re- 
produce these features. It is unfair 
to advertise a Strain unless a breeder 
has such and the time will come 
when such advertising will be looked 
into and refused. 



MISSOURI STATE FAIR 



The State Fairs will soon be here 
again and it's high time to begin 
bringing some of your birds around 
at the right time as the winnings 
are worth while and every breeder 
in their respective states should have 
pride enough in their State Fairs to 
make an exhibit. 

Missouri will hold its State Fair 
on August 19th to 2 6th. Don't for- 
get the dates. There is no better 



balanced pure-bred poultry state in 
the Union than Missouri. For this 
reason the Missouri State Fair held 
at Sedalia always brings out a large 
entry of choice birds, bred by the 
best breeders in Missouri and sur- 
rounding states. 

Judge V. O. Hobbs has again been 
drafted to Superintend the Poultry 
Department. It has been said of 
Judge Hobbs, by his intimate friends, 
that he never asks for any position, 
but that he is lucky and these places 
of honor just strike him. However, 
Judge Hobbs is recognized, not only 
in his community as a man of ability, 
but he truly is a man of rare intel- 
lectual attainments and extensive 
business experience. The Missouri 
Fair Board claimed that the Poultry 
Department was the best conducted 
of any Department of the Fair last 
year and were unanimously all in 
one when Judge Hobbs was men- 
tioned for Superintendent of the 
Poultry Department for this year. 

We are not informed at this time 
who the Judges and Assistants will 
be, but you can rest assured that the 
State Fair in Missouri will be a suc- 
cess in every way, let it be few or 
many birds as no job is too big for 
the management of this Great State 
Institution. 

Let's hope we may meet you at 
the Missouri State Fair. 




With their BCissor-like jaws they bite constantly 
— thousands of them at one time— irritating the 
fowl almost beyond endurance, robbing it of blood 
and rest, cutting down its vitality and rendering 
1 1 an easy prey todisease. No wonder lousy chick- 
ens never do well for themselves or their owner. 
When a fowl seems restless and picks at itself, 
look for lice. 

. Go After lace Quickly 

with Conkey's Lice Powder. It comes in a handy 
package with a sifter top. making it easy to dust 
the powder thoroughly into the feathers. Body 
lice don't like it — help to keep your flock free by 
occasional dusting. 

Conkey's Lice Liquid helps to rid your fowls 
and houses of mites. For painting roosts, fit- 
tings, nest boxes and wherever mites congregate 
We guarantee it to satisfy you. 
Conkey's Lice Fix is an ointment-a new and 
very effective way of fighting body 
lice. 

Conkey's Head Lice Ointment 

helps to overcome the head lice 
that eat up" baby chicks. 
Insiston Conkey's. If your dealer cannot 
supply you, write us. Send 6c in stamps 
for Conkey's Big Poultry Book. 

The G. E. Conkey Co. 
6542 Broadway Cleveland, Ohio 

(75) 



Conkey's 

Lice Powder 




Hess Poultry 

PA1M-A-CE-A 

Makes poultry healthy and makes hens lay. 
See your poultry supply dealer. 

Dr. Hess & Clark, Ashland, Ohio 



$1 Q95 Buys 1 40- Egg Champion I 

10 Belle City Incubator! 

Hot-Water.Copper Tank, Double Walls 
Fibre Board, Self Regulated. (ja oc 
S7.9S baya 140-Chick Hot-vl*| 
Water Brooder. Or both for only • »* ^™ 

Express Prepaid 

East of Rockies ar>d 
allowed to points Weal 
Guaranteed. Order now. Shan 
in my $1 000 in Prizes, or write 
forFreeBook HatchingFacts " 
It tells everything. Jim Rohan , Pre* 

Belle City Incubator Co., Bor 145 Racine, Wis. 





LOOK clIZZs $9.50 a 100 

10 varieties. World's greatest laying strains. 
Pullets, eggs, stock, seeds, feed, etc. Write to 
HOUCK'S LEGHORN FARM. Box 81, Tiffin, 0. 



Do You Want 



to purchase some valuable breeders for next year? Now is your 
time. I am disposing of a few of my breeders at less than half 
price. Heavy layers. Producers of exhibition stock. Good color, 
(rood type. If interested write immediately as they will not last long at the price I am asking. 
Eggs half price now. Can furnish a 
few pens yet at reduced prices. 



Lewis Clevenger, - Linneus, Mo. 



BALLARD'S SUPREME WHITE ROCKS 



Have mated some fine pens 
P. W. BALLARD, 



for the egg trade from my Champion winners. Mating list on request. 

GALESBURG, ILL. 



BRED TO WIN AND LAY 



HORNER'S PEDIGREED S. C. REDS 

Cockerels for Sale. We can furnish you with Show birds, or strong fine breeders. So. 00 and 
up. At Illinois State Fair, 1st Pen, in a hot class of 17 pens, also 2nd Pullet in a class 
of 47. Adams County Fair, Cockerels, 1, 3, 4, 5; Pullets. 1, 2, 3, 4,; and Pens 1, 2; Champion 
Pen; Champion Pullet. Pen mated. Write for matting list. 

R. R. 7, Quincy, Illinois 



ERNEST G. HORNER, 



Why Not Get REAL TOM BARRON Leghorn Chicks and Eggs 

from a firm that has imported direct each year since 1915, at prices but 
little higher than the Commercial Hatcheries charge for common stock. 
Chicks $15.00 per 100, $13.50 per 100 after June 1st. Eggs $8.00 per 100 
with free replacement for all non fertiles. Orders filled promptly from this 
ad or send for descriptive list to 

COLEMAN MILES EGG FARM, Lnpoiters. Box N, Mt. Carroll, 111. 



W T' S CAPON $J? ? 

A book that explains why Capons are the most profitable part of the poultry business and everything 
vou will ever want to know about CAPONS. 50 pictures from life that show each step in t ic, 
;>T*'ration. List of Capon Dealers' addresses. Tells how to prevent "Slips," wliere to get the, 
best and cheapest capon tools. Capons are immense eating. Big profits realized. Get wise. Ihis. 
book tells how. Copyrighted new and revised edition. Regular 50c copy, prepaid to your address 
(a short time only) for a Dime in coin or stamps. „„__ 
V GEORGE BEU0Y, R. R. 17, CEDAR VALE, KANSAS. 



Page Number 10 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



KILL THEM ALL 

Every Rat and Mouse easily des- 
troyed by New Discovery 
Not a Poison 

Absolute freedom from rats and mice is now 
assured everyone. No more trapping and pois- 
oning just a few. Clean out the whole bunch, 
old, young, big and little. 




MARKETING EGGS BY PARCEL 
POST 

(Continued from Page 3) 



Hick's Rat Killer Kills every rat or mouse 
on your place. Most wonderful of all it does 
not harm anything but rats, mice, gophers 
and other rodents. It is harmless to children, 
pets, poultry and all kinds of stock. It can 
be spread anywhere and will kill only rats 
and mice. This death bringing disease rapidly 
spreads and quickly destroys all the rats and 
mice. There is no smell or odor for they run 
outside for water and die away from the 
building. 

A Trial Costs You Nothing 

Mr. Hick is offering everyone troubled with 
these pests the chance to get rid of them 
at no cost to themselves. He will send three 
large double strength, one dollar bottles for 
the price of one. You, keep one for yourself; 
the other two you sell to your neighbors at 
one dollar each, thus getting your own free 
and in addition making a dollar profit. Send 
$1.00 today (currency, money order, check, 
etc.) to Chas. H. Hick & Co., Dept. 1305, 
1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. If you 
prefer, send no money, just your name and 
address and pay postman $1.00 and postage 
on delivery. If after two weeks trial you 
are not absolutely satisfied, write Mr. Hick 
and your money will be refunded. 



Barred Rock 

Baby Chicks 

And AR Other Standard Varieties. 

I make a specialty of Barred Rock chicks and 
I can guarantee my customers that they will 
be more than satisfied if they order chlx from 
me, as I keep nothing but the choicest of 
birds in my flocks, and they are culled each 
year for high egg production. Every customer 
ordering from me must be satisfied or money 
will be cheerfully refunded. Barred Rock 
chicks $16.50 per hundred. 

FRED YUNKER, Dakota, Illinois 



regulations governing the same and 
of course knowing that his eggs are 
high grade he will feel it a duty to 
keep his reputation as spotless and 
free from questionable dealings as 
possible. Sometimes you may feel 
compelled to purchase eggs from 
neighbors to fill out orders but re- 
member your reputation and never 
for an instant loose sight of the fact 
that one dozen poor eggs may ruin 
thousands of dollars worth of bus- 
iness for you and besides your repu- 
tation will be on trial. 

When you know that the quality 
of your product is the best you know 
how to produce, then and not until 
then should you attempt to find a 
parcel post market. Often poultry- 
men fail simply because they go out 
and hunt up a market and are not 
able to supply this market with the 
quality of eggs which it requires. 
That means a loss of customers and 
when you do get where you can pro- 
duce a good article you will find it 
difficult to secure another market. 
The question is just how to get in 
touch with the class of trade which 
you wish to encourage. One good 
way is to go to a high grade ladies 
tailor and try to make a proposition 
to him which will enable you to cir- 
culize his list of customers. For that 
matter you could use the list of any 
high grade merchant. The daily pa- 
pers may also be used to acquaint 
the public with what you have to sell. 
After you have a list of names write 
personal letters and explain in detail 
the safe-guards you are using to in- 
sure perfectly fresh, clean, sanitary 
eggs and solicite their orders on the 
basis of having a superior article. 
Urge the point that you are using the 
finest, hard, clean grain and purest 
water and it follows that only the 
best quality can be produced under 
such conditions. Invite inspection and 
when any visitors come, be sure to 
show them every attention and con- 
stantly call their attention to the san- 
itary coops, the sweet, clean feeds 
and the guarantee that the eggs are 



FEED FOR QUICK GROWTH 



MARTIN'S REGALS 




HALF PRICE EGG SALE 

For the balance of the season all eggs 
will be sold at half price as follows: 



Pens 1-10 (Exhibi- 
tion M a t i n g s) 
$5.00 per 15, 
$14.00 per 50, 
$25.00 per 100. 

Pens 11-20 — $3.00 
per 15, $9.00 per 
50, $17.00 per 100. 
Pens 21-40 (Dor- 
cas) $2.50 per 15, 
$7.50 per 50, 
$13.50 per 100. 

All eggs guaranteed 75% or over strongly fertilized. These remark- 
ably low prices wil make a very heavvy demand for the balance of the 
season. Rush your order direct from this ad, and produce some of 
AMERICA'S FINEST WHITE WYANDOTTES. 

Free — Send for Catalogue and Slimmer Sale List, ready now. 

JOHN S. MARTIN, Box 408, Port Dover, Ont., Can. 



Pens 25-32 (Special 
Dorcas) $5.00 _per 
15, $14.00 per 50, 
$25.00 per 100. 

All-Star Matings — 
$10.00 and $12.50 
per 15. 

Utility Matings as 
they run — $10.00 
per 100. 




Save Feed — Prevent Lice and Mites 

This is the time of the year every 
poultry raiser should look ahead to 
plan for big profits for next fall and 
winter. It is the early fall and win- 
ter eggs that make best poultry prof- 
its. A little time taken now to ap- 
ply tested methods means many dol- 
lars later. Best methods should be 
used to feed for quick growth and 
save feed. Even at the present low 
grain prices, feeds should not be 
wasted. Don't 
lose money ex- 
p e r imenting. 
Take advant- 
age of what 
others have 
proven by 
years of costly 
effort. Every 
poultry raiser 
should read 
"Dollars and 
Sense in the 
Poultry Busi- 
ness" by Prof. 
T. E. Quisen- 
herry, one of 
America's foremost poultry authori- 
ties. This new 9 6 page book will be 
sent free to any reader of this paper. 
This free book outlines methods: 
How to prevent lice and mites. 
How to treat chick diseases. 
How to develop chicks to early 
layers. 

How to grow chicks quickly and 
save feed. 

And hundreds of other useful poul- 
try secrets and methods. 

Write today. A post card will 
bring you this valuable free book at 
once. Just send your name and ad- 
dress to the American Poultry 
School, Dept. 4017, Kansas City, 
Missouri. 

the best that your skill can produce. 
The first few customers is a problem. 
After you get a few customers they 
will tell their friends and the result 
will be that you will soon have a 
waiting list. One poultryman played 
up the waiting list in such a manner 
that prospective customers felt they 
were priviledged when they were 
placed on the list of regular cus- 
tomers. 

The next problem which confronts 
you is the kind of a shipping box to 
use. There are many boxes on the 
market, good, bad and indifferent. 
For permanent customers the metal 
box has proven quite satisfactory- Of 
course you want such boxes returned 
and as they have a reversible address 
card it makes this easy. These boxes 
may be used for years and while the 
first cost is greater than the common 
box, yet the service they give makes 
them the cheapest in the end. If the 
customer does not want to bother to 
return the box or is not reliable so 
that you care to ship in the metal 
box, you might use the corrugated 
paper boxes which do quite well. The 
packages should reach the customer 
in a satisfactory condition, no eggs 
should be broken and that should be 
the first aim. The second should be 
the appearance of the eggs. No 
slouchy package should be sent out. 
Make the package look attractive and 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 11 



Science Discovers 
Greatest Lice Killer 

Changes Old Methods. No Dusting or Spraying. 
Birds Delouse Themselves. Gives Lasting Relief. 

A recent discovery promises to revolutionize 
all the methods accepted up to now for keep- 
ing poultry free from lice and mites. This 
wonderful lice killer keeps the birds always 
lice free without the poultry raiser doing any 
work. It is the simplest, easiest, surest and 
best method ever discovered. 




Hick's Lice Kill, which is the name of this 
sensational lice killer, is added to the chunk- 
ing water. The medicine taken into the sys- 
tem of the bird comes out through the pores 
and every louse or mite dies or leaves the 
body. It does not injure the hatchability or 
flavor of the eggs or meat; is harmless to 
chicks and does not affect the plumage. A 
few days treatment at the start and then a 
little in the drinking water each .month. 

A Trial Costs You Nothing 

So confident is Mr. Hicks that Hick's Lice 
Kill will kill every louse or mite, that lie is 
making a special guaranteed offer of two 
regular full sized, double strength, $1.00 bot- 
tles and a regular $1.00 package of Hick's 
Egg-Lay Tablets all for $1.00. Use one bot- 
tle yourself and sell the other at one dollar, 
thus getting your own free. Send $1.00 today 
(currency, money order, check, etc) to Chas. 
M. Hick & Co., Dept 375, 1018 S. Wabash 
Ave., Chicago, 111. If you prefer, send no 
money just your name and address, and pay 
postman $1.00 and postage on delivery. If 
after two weeks trial you are not absolutely 
satisfied, write Mr. Hick and your money will 
be refunded. 



neat. The appearance may not make 
the eggs any better but it is certain 
to give the customer a good impres- 
sion and it will go a long way toward 
keeping him. 

Many otherwise successful egg 
farms fail when it comes to the busi- 
ness end or in other words the keep- 
ing of records. It is quite true that 
this takes some time but if you ex- 
pect to make collections you must 
send out statements promptly on the 
first of the month. This requires 
that records be kept so that the state- 
ments may be sent regularly. A large 
percentage of your customers will be 
business men and nothing will make 
them angry sooner than to find a 
fellow is lax in his business meth- 
ods. Your eggs may suit him exact- 
ly but he must have the statements 
in a business like manner. Some 
seem to think that the keeping of 
records is a difficult task. Such is 
not the case at all. In fact the hard- 
est part of it is the getting at it. 
We recommend a memorandum book 
in which the transactions of the day 
are jotted down. At night these are 
put in the journal and then posted to 
a ledger. Probably five or ten min- 
utes at night will attend to all this 
matter and perhaps the good wife 
would be willing to do this work for 
you. Some keep a three column 
journal, putting sales in the first 
column, purchases in the second and 
net profit in the third column. In 
this way you know at a glance just 
how you stand with the world. 

The selling of eggs is a business 
and should be conducted on that bas- 
is. If you supply a superior article 
and put it up in attractive form, you 



will eventually find that you will 
have more customers than you can 
handle. This has been the case with 
many others and there is every rea- 
son to believe that it will be dupli- 
cated in your case. 



QUALITY BABY CHICKS 



We are sure our readers would 
value very highly the splendid 32 
page illustrated catologue which is 
sent free for the asking by the Mis- 
souri Poultry Farms, Columbia, Mo. 
These people have 20,000 breeders 
bred exclusively for high egg pro- 
duction, each selected by the Hogan 
test and including the popular var- 
ieties of Leghorns, Rocks, Reds, Or- 
pingtons, Wyandottes. and Anconas. 
They have an incubator capacity of 
10,000 eggs per day. They guaran- 
tee live arrival and will be glad to 
hear from any of our readers who 
care for a copy of their catalogue. 



BUFF ORPINGTONS 



Lewis Clevenger, Linneus, Mo., is 
offering some of his breeding stock 
at remarkably low prices at this time. 
This will be a splendid opportunity 
for Orpington breeders to secure 
some splendid breeders of the single 
comb variety. Look up his ad in 
another part of this issue. 



MAKE UP A CLUB 

Make up a club of your own, 
choosing the papers or magazines you 
want to take. Write and let me 
quote a special price. I can save you 
considerable money on your subscrip- 
tions. A. Otis Arnold. Quincy, 111. 






SUPER SOL-HOT 
Heater for Canopy 
Brooders and 
Incubators L 

x> 

Only 
Heater with 
Positive Oil Control 

The Super Sol-Hot is the only heater on the mar- 
ket with a positive oil control— it maintains a con- 
stant oil level— it's automatic— burr.s even flame all 
the time. Acquaint yourself with the Super Sol-Hot 
before next sea-on. Write now for free descriptive 
folder. We'll alsosend you folder telling all about my 



Sectional Incubator 

The Multi-dek "add a section as you need it" idea 
]u=t exactly fits hi with the average poultry raisers' 
requirements, 250 to 3000 egg capacitv, furnished 
complete, ready to set up, or vou can build it your- 
self from set of plans we furnish free. A big winner. 
Write for tree folde 




H. M. SHEER CO. 
Dept. 28 QUINCY, ILL 



When "writing advertisers please mention 
tliis paper. 




QUALITY BABY CHICKS 

20,000 BREEDERS, bred exclusively for high egg 
production, and standard qualities. Every fowl selected 
by the Hogan Test. Our Leghorns, Rocks, Reds, 
Orpington, Wyandottes, and Anconas bred to capacity 
of 200 egg hens. 

LARGE PRODUCTION enables us to sell quality 
chicks at price of common hatchery product 

INCUBATOR CAPACITY 10,000 eggs each day, 
all eggs used are from these flocks. 

Our 32-page illustrated catalogue is free, and gives 
valuable information on care of chicks and poultry. 

Hatching eggs in season at very reasonable prices. 
Chicks shipped by parcel post prepaid, live arrival 
guaranteed. 

MISSOURI POULTRY FARMS, 

Columbia, Mo. 




Lady Layer 

Laid 326 Efcfes 
in One 
i Year 



HALF PRICES 
on Eggs and Chicks 

from PURITAS SPRINGS 
WORLD'S GREATEST 

Trapnested Winter- Laying Strain of 

S, G. White Leghorns 

THEY LAY IN WINTER You want a laying strain of Single Comb White Leghorns. They 
^— — ^ — — ^ are the most profitable. Puritas Springs Leghorns are known 
the world over for their heavy laying. They lay in Winter as well as in summer. They lay large 
white eggs, which bring highest market prices. Get our eggs and chicks now at half price. We 
Will make prompt delivery. 8 to 12 weeks old pullets are also good buy. We have a grand lot of 
them, hundreds of them are sold but we have thousands. But remember, they sell like hot cakes. 
Puritas Springs Leghorns have been trapnested for 10 years without missing one day. Is it any 
wonder that they lay? Our catalog tells all about them. Send for our half-price list on eggs and 
day old chicks. Please mention if you have our catalog. 

Puritas Springs Poultry Farm, Box P-111, Avon Lake, Ohio l;^ r ^ E f f K, B 0 ( ^ , > r - ] gSi 




Page Number 12 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Wipe Out Every 
Rat and Mouse 



Amazing Xew Discovery Quickly Kills 
Them All. Not a Poison. 

Rats, Jliee, Gophers — in fact all Rodents can 
now be wiped out easily and quickly. Imperial 
Virus will do it. This new discovery, is a 
fluid, true A'irus. Entirely harmless to hu- 
mans, poultry, stock, pets, etc-. 




Infects Rodents only. Greedily eaten on bait. 
Sets up burning fever. The pests communicate 
it to others, and all die outside, hunting air 
and water. Imperial Virus is put up in sealed 
bottles, thus insuring full strength and potency. 
Only- safe, sanitary method to overcome these 
pests. Protect your Poultry, especially Baby 
Chicks and Egg Hatches. 

YOU CAN GET YOURS FREE 

Hi-re's how! Send $1.00 today (currency, 
it. O. Checks, etc) and we will give you 
by return mail, postpaid. two regular, full 
sized I double strength) $1.00 bottles of Im- 
perial Virus. Use one to - rid your place of 
these pests, and sell the other to a neighbor, 
thus getting yours free. Special inducement to 
represent us. 

If more convenient, send no money. just 
your name and address to Imperial " Labora- 
tories, Dept 8-11, 2110 Grand Are., Kansas 
City, Mo., Pay postman si. 00 and few cents 
postage when two bottles arrive. Guaranteed 
to do the work to your entire satisfaction 
within 30 days or your SI. 00 will be cheer- 
fully refunded. 



Oat Sprouter $2.49 

For .$2.49, including heater, you can make the 
best oat sprouter on earth. Plans for building. 10c 
I. PUTNAM, Route 624-0, ELMIRA. N. Y. 



BABY 



From Great Layers. Full-blooded stock. 

One ol the Largest 
and Best Equipped 
Hatcheries In the 
WORLD. 

Over 50.000 Cob Weekly, 

Postpaid to your door, and 
guaranteed 95^ alive delivery. 

Customers report hens as laying 280 
eggs a year from our stock. 

Get our famous blood lines of 
leghorns, Anconas, Rocks, Reds, 
Orpingtons, W'yandottes, 
Mlnorcas. 

Get our low prices first, before ordering. 
We save you money. 
Large instructive catalog free. 

FARROW-BIRSH CO., PEORIA. ILL 



JUNE. JULY, AUGUST PRICES. 

Assorted _ .? 9.00 — 100 

"White and Brown Leghorns 11.00 — 100 

Anconas _ 12.00—100 

Barred Rocks _ 13.00—100 

S. C. Reds _ _ 13.00 — 100 

R. C. Reds 14.00—100 

White Rocks 15.00—100 

White Wyandottes 16.00—100 

Black Minorcas _ 16.00 — 100 

Buff Orpingtons _ 17.00 — 100 




TIMELY TOPICS 

Readers are asked to co-operate in making this Department 
interesting by sending in suitable items to, F. Raymond 
Benson, 915 Augusta Ave., Elgin, Illinois. 



Xo Brains 

The shades of night were falling fast,. 
The fool "stepped on it" and rushed 
past. 

A crash — he died without a sound; 
They opened up his head and found 
Excelsior! 

— Boston Transcript. 

* • ■ • 

A year book has been issued by the 
National Utility Poultry Association 
of England. As the book contains 
seine 2 98 pages it shows that inter- 
est in this cause is not lagging across 
the big pond. 

* • * 

The Blue Orpington Club has been 
formed with Percy A. Cook, Scotch 
Plains, New Jersey as Secretary. A 
large number of names have already 
been put on the list of members and 
if you breed Blue Orpingtons, get in 
touch with Mr. Cook. 

* * * 

Out in Kansas we understood that 
a smooth-talking fellow comes along 
and agrees to cull the farm flock for 
one cent per head, taking the culled 
birds to market. The result is that 
he gets the layers and the farmer 
gets the non-producers. Don't let 
any such "expert' cull your flock. 

Of course you plan to attend the 
Illinois State Fair to be held Septem- 
ber 16-2 3. 

D. E. Hale is authority for the 
statement that Frank De Lancy will 
be a candidate for the presidency of 
the American Poultry Association in 
1923. 

* * * 

Editor Grant M. Curtis has been 
sticking around the west for some 
months. We don't wonder for the 
climate is certainly great and the 
people are still better. Why can't 
folks everywhere be as congenial? 

The next National Show in Chicago 
will be held January 17-23- 1923. 
This is always a good show and one 
that many of our readers will want 

to make note of the date. 

* * * 

The Annual Convention of the In- 
ternational Baby Chick Association 
will be held August 1, 2, 3, and 4, 
1922, at Cedar Point, Sandusky, 
Ohio. No doubt there will be a good 
attendance and an instructive pro- 
gram. 



ScotfsS.C.Reds 

WIN BEST DISPLAY 

Illinois State Poultry Show, Freeport, 111., Jan 5, to 8. They 
have made many good wins in the hands of customers. 

'TIS A MARK OF DISTINCTION to breed Scott's Reds. Four 
females in egg laying contest, Storrs, Conneticut, layed 840 
eggs in one year, an average of 210 eggs each. If intererted 
write for mating list. 



C. P. SCOTT, 



Box M, 



PEORIA, ILL. 




Have you tried "Licecil" yet? Al- 
most time you did isn't it? 

We understand that the National 
White Wyandotte Club has given 
away eggs for setting to worthy boys 
and girls. This is an excellent way 
to interest the young people in good 
stock and at the same time give them 
a start in such a popular variety as 
this breed. We predict other clubs 
will follow this example. 

The Poultry Producers of Ontario 
is the name of a new organization, 
up in Canada and when we see a man 
like John S. Martin back of it we 
know that it is going to be a winner. 

Mr. H. R. Jackson has been se- 
cured for extension poultry work in 
the University of Kentucky, taking 
the position left by Mr. A. S. Chapin. 

Mr. C. H. King, Madison, Wiscon- 
sin had a fire last February which de- 
troyed stock and buildings but as 
luck was with him, he had a lot of 
hatching eggs on hand and is thus 
able to save his strain of S. C. White 
Leghorns. We look to see him back 
in 192 3, stronger than ever. 

William L. Deemer has purchased 
a place at Danboro, Pennsylvania and 
expects to establish a large poultry 
plant in the near future. Mr. Deem- 
er has had ample experience in this 
line and no doubt will make a suc- 
cess of the venture. 

* » * 

Judge J. T. Baldwin of Philadel- 
phia has been selling out his Light 
Brahmas because of other pressing 
duties. Breeders will be sorry to 
learn of this because he had a most 
excellent strain. 

We regret to learn of the death 
of Mr. Frank P. Wirbach, a promi- 
nent breeder of Rhode Island Whites. 
This breed can ill afford to loose 
him at the present moment and the 
poultry industry always feels the loss 
of such a man. 

We hear that W. C. Carl of Read- 
ing, Pennsylvania has sold his New 
Zealand Red Rabbits to the Joloris 
Rabbitry, of Maspeth, L. I. The deal 
included many winners and is one of 
the most important lately recorded. 

The American Buff Plymouth Rock 
Club has elected officers and all 
breeders should get in touch with the 
Secretary, Mr. I. M. Asbjeld, Alcester, 
South Dakota. This club needs your 
support. 

The Western Poultry Journal 
which was founded by the late E. 
E. Richards, has been taken over by 
the Poultry Breeders Publishing 
Company of Waverly, Iowa. We are 
glad to see this journal fall into such 
good hand for we know that it will 
be ably published. Our best wishes 
to you, brothers. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 13 




3,500 Chicks Sent Our Recently From Our Fa 
10,000 Chicks Each AVeek And Raising 20,000 
TRY FARM, BROWNSTOWN, INDIANA. 



rm In One Lot Shipment. We Are Hatching 
For Our Own Farm. BROWNSTOWN POUL- 



Mr. L. E. Heifner, Des Moines, 
Iowa has been appointed State Sec- 
retary of the National White Wyan- 
dotte Club and would like to get m 
touch with all breeders of White Wy- 
andottes in Iowa. 

t * * 

The Omaha Show will be held 
Thanksgiving week this year and this 
notice will give you plenty of time 
to get your birds ready. Mr. Henry 
Knudsen is secretary and will be glad 
to hear from you if you intend to 
enter some birds. 

The American Poultry Association 
will be at Knoxville, August 8-12 so 
you better pack your grip. There's 
going to be something doing every 
minute. 

* * * 

When a man is down in the mouth 
he is down and out. 

The Keipper Cooping Company has 
established a warehouse at Jackson- 
ville, Florida. This is another proof 
that poultry interest in the South is 

on the upgra* 1 " 

* * * 

Mr. R. E. Sandy, Stuarts Draft, 
Virginia, the well know White Or- 
pington breeder is going to move to 
a new farm where he will be better 
able to carry on his poultry business. 
We notice a number of breeders seem 
to be needing larger farms. And yea 

some folks say that poultry don't pay. 

* * * 

The American White Orpington 
Club is making progress under the 
able secretary Mr. J. I. Lytle. 1200 
West 7th St., Plainfield, New Jersey. 
Breeders of this breed should get in- 
to this Club and help boost. 

* * # 

Where can you buy so much as 
when you send in a dollar for a 
three year subscription for POUL- 
TRY KEEPER? 

* * * 

Secretary Fred H. Bohrer, of Utica, 
New York has sent out another fine 
issue of the Club Book of the Amer- 
ican Cornish Club. This volume is a 
credit to the Club and will be read 
with much interest by members and 
also non-members. But why non- 
members, why not join in the bunch? 



Speaking of Club Books reminds 
us that the United Ancona Club has 
just sent us a copy of their Year 
Book and it is very nicely gotten up 
and speaks well for the work of the 
Secretary Mr. Roy W. VanHoesen, 
Franklinville, New York. This Club 
is doing a host towards helping An- 
ccnas and if you breed them we sug- 
gest that you write the genial secre- 
tary and get in with a real bunch of 
good fellows. 

* * * 

The Great Allentown Fair which is 
known the country over has branched 
out and purchased a new tract of 
ground. This is a move in the right 
direction although it will be several 
years before they can occupy the new 
ground. We look to see an even 
Greater Allentown Fair and wish the 
management every success. 

* * * 

Theo. Hewes says that Mr. H. L. 
Mapes will judge the Rhode Island 
Reds at the next Coliseum Show in 
Chicago. This will prove quite satis- 
factory to the many Red breeders 
who will enter their birds at this 
show. The show will be held Decem- 
ber 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10. 

PRESERVE EGGS NOW 

for use or vale when prices highest. EGG-O-LATUM keeps «ers 
perfectly one year, at cost of 1 ct. per do*. No odor: poach, boit. 
whip like fresn Kept in ordinary carton or case in cellar. Easily 
*pplte-i. At dealers, or by mail postpaid, 60c and $1 .00 stint. 

CiEO. N. LEE CO., Dept. P-20 OMAHA, NEBRt 



MINERALIZED WATER 
ROUTS CHICKEN LICE 



Tablets Dropped into Drinking Founts 
Banish Vermin, Make Fowls Grow 
Faster and Increase Egg Yield. 



Any poultry raiser can easily rid his flock 
of lice and mites, make chickens grow faster 
and increase their egg yield by simply add- 
ing minerals to the fowls' drinking water. 
This does away with all bother, such as dust- 
ing, greasing, dipping and spraying. The 
necessary minerals can now be obtained in 
convenient tablets, known as Paratabs. Soon> 
after the fowls drink the mineralized water, 




all lice and mites leave them. The tablets 
also act as a tonic conditioner. The health 
of the fowls quickly improves, they grow 
faster and the egg yield frequently is 
doubled. Little chicks that drink freely of 
the .water never will be bothered bv mites or 
lies. 

The method is especially recommended for 
raisers of purebred stock, as there is no risk 
of soiling- the plumage. The tablets are 
warranted to impart no flavor or odor to the 
eggs and meat. This remarkable conditioner, 
egg tonic and lice remedy costs eniy a trifle 
and is sold under an absolute guarantee. 
The tablets are scientifically prepared, per- 
fectly safe, and dissolve readily in water. 

Any reader of this paper may try them 
without risk. The laboratories producing 
Pari'.tabs are so confident of good results 
that to introduce them to every poultry 
raiser they offer two big $1 packages for 
only ?1. Send no money, just your name and 
address — a card will do — to the Paratab 
Laboratories, Dept. 814, 1100 Coca Cola 
Bldg., Kansas City, Mo., and the two $1 pack- 
ages, enough for 100 gallons of water, will be 
mailed. Pay the postman !fl and postage on 
deUvery, and if you are not delighted with 
results in 10 days — if your chickens are not 
healthier, laying more eggs and entirely free 
from lice and mites — your money will be 
promptly refunded. Don't hesitate to accept 
this trial offer as you are fully protected by 
this guarantee. 



Poultry Leg Bands 

THE "BEST YET" ALUMINUM. 
Not colored. Will stay on. 12.20c: 
25. 30o; 50. 50c: 100. 90c. State 
breed. 

CELLULOID SPIRAL BANDS. 
Red, Green, Amber, Pink. Black. 
White, Yellow. Purple. Light Blue. 
Dark Blue. Ruby, Cerise. 

Sizefor 12 25 50 100 250 500 

BabyChicks. Pigeons. .$.10 $.20 $.35 f .60 $1.25 $2.25 

Growing Chicks 15 30. .40 .75 1.75 3.00 

Leghorns. Anconaa . . .20 .35 .50 .90 2.00 3.60 

Rocks. Reds, etc .20 .40 .60 1.00 2.25 4.00 

Asiatics .25 .45 .75 1.20 2.75 5.00 

Turkeys. Geese 30 .50 .85 1.40 3.25 6.00 

Aluminum Marker Works, Dept. 13 Beaver Falls, Pa. 




1 y 2 MILLION Chicks for 1922 

Postage PAID and 

95% Live Arrival Guaranteed 




Month's Feed 
FREE 

With Each Order 



A hatch every week all year. DO IT WITH OUR CHICKS if you want to 
make QUICK money, 40 breeds chicks, 4 breeds ducklings. Select and Ex- 
hibition grades. Catalogue free, stamps appreciated. 

NABOB HATCHERIES, Dept. 16, Gambier, Ohio 



Page Number 14 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Feed Baby Chicks 
Soon As Hatched 

Prevent White Diarrhea 



"Baby chicks, when hatched, must be given 
a preventive against white diarrhea, which is 
responsible for 00 per i cent" of the lo'ss' to 
poultry raisers. 

Dr. E. J. Netherton, a veterinarian .of 30, 
years' experience, has prepared a feeding 
which is to be given as soon as hatched. 
Chicks and turkeys fed this the first thing do 
not get white diarrhea, and thus you save 00 
per cent of every hatch. 

Dr. Xetherton is so confident that he will 
send a dollar package to any honest person. 
Send no money; do not pay the postman; but 
if satisfied with results, after fair trial, re- 
mit one dollar. If not pleased you owe 
nothing. 

Take advantage of this liberal offer today. 
Simply send name to Dr. Netherton, N-&-H 
Co., 3S2 N. Seventh St., Kansas City, Kan. 



RAISE RHODE ISLAND REDS 

'HE B E S f A L L P UUP 0 S E BREED 



Your name and address w ill bring free 
educational literatureonRhode Island 
Reds and information why they are 
the greatest money-making poultry 
breed; also catalogs and circulars from 
leadintr Red breeders. For full informa- 
tion address 

RHODE ISLAND RFD CLUB of AMERICA 
W. H. Card. Sec.,Box 914 , Manchester, Conn. 
This ad paid for by C. P. Scott, Peoria, 111. 




Thickens Sick 9 

Hens Notr Laying £ 

There's no excuse for roup, cold?, canker, sole head, chicken 
pox, skin dis-nriicre , ■■■h^k-ra, iriuiKestion, bowel trouble and such 
ailments. GEHMOZONE positively will rid y»ur chickens of dis- 
ease— and keep them healthy. For over 30 years the di-pendable 
remedy and preventive. Get Germozone and Lee's FREE BOOK- 
LETS, whicn explain proper feeding and care and how to keep 
buns layingTeEtilarly the year round. At drug or seed stores. If 
nodealer, i-rder hycard. 75c and 3 l .50 sized. Send no money— 
Postman will collect. No extra ciiarpre. 



GEO. H. LEE CO., Dept. p_20 



Omaha, Neb. 




SAVES 
FOOD 



Catch tray A, collects 
waste and returns it 
when inverted to close 
hopper against rats and 
mice at night. (See dot- 
ted lines). If your deal- 
er can not supply you send for circular and 
order direct. 

M. R. JACOBUS, Box 5-K. Ridgefield, N. J. 



Cured Her 

Rheumatism 

Knowing from terrible experience the suf- 
fering caused by rheumatism, Mrs. J. E. Hurst, 
who lives at 508 E. Olive St., B 6, Blooming- 
ton, HI., is so thankful at having cured her- 
self that out of pure gratitude she . is an- 
xious to tell all other sufferers just how to 
get rid of their torture by a simple way at 
home. 

Sirs. Hurst has nothing to sell. Merely cut 
out this notice, mail it to her with your 
own name and address, and she will gladly 
send you this valuable information entirely 
free. "Write her at once before you forget. 

You Can Cure 
Your Rupture 

Capt. Collings Will Send You 
Free His Plan by Which 
He Cured Himself. 

Thousands of ruptured men and women will 
rejoice to know that Capt. Collings who was 
helpless and bed-ridden for years with double 
rupture will send free to all the full plan by 
which he cured himself at home. 

Merely send vour name and address to Capt. 
W. A. Collings, Inc., Box 561F, AVatertown, N. 
Y. It won't cost you a cent and may be worth 
a fortune. Hundreds have already cured them- 
selves by just this free information. 



BABY CHICKS WITH THE STAMP OF QUALITY 

Yes, and They Are Hoganized, Too! 

We hatch the following: Rocks, Reds, Leghorns, Anconas, Andalua*ans, 
Orpingtons, Wyandottes, Langshans, Cornish, Hamburgs. 
Our 4 0 page catalogue free. 

Brooders, Poultry supplies. We can save you money. 



The South Kenton Poultry Farm, 

CHAS. W. WYLTE, Supt. 



Box 115, Kenton, Ohio 

GEO. W. COX, Prop. 



A new organization has been com- 
pleted under the name of the Ameri- 
con Old English Game Bantam Club 
and anyone interested should write 
Dr. N. L. May, Butler, Pennsylvania. 

V * * * 

We just learn that owing to sick- 
ness in the family Mr. C. L. Pre 
Fontaine of Fon du Lac, Wisconsin 
feels it necessary to dispose of his 
entire flock of Single Comb Rhode 
Island Reds. This flock won at the 
Chicago National Show and it is too 
bad Mr. Pre Fontaine has to sell out 
but we trust he will soon be back 
iii the poultry game. 

We thank those who have so kind- 
ly sent in items for this column and 
wish to extend the priviledge to every 
reader. We want Timely Topics and 
none other. 



POULTRY MADE PROFITABLE 



"OCULUM" the Great Poultry 
Germicide is making the Poultry man 
happy. It turns his diseased birds 
into layers and" his frowns into 
smiles. 

For 15 years "OCULM" has given 
satisfaction all over the U. S. and 
many foreign lands. Send 10c to the 
"OCULUM" Co., Salem, Va., for a 
sample. 



AXXIAL ELECTION AMERICAN 
POULTRY ASSOCIATION 



Results as shown by the report of 
the Election Commissioner: 

President, Thomas F. Rigg, Ft. 
Wayne, Ind. 

Vice President, H. A. Nourse, St. 
Paul Minn. 

Board of Directors: 

District No. 2, F. W. Delancey, 
York Pa. 

District No. 4, B. E. Adams. 
Charleston, S. C. 

District No. 6, V. O. Hobbs, Kan- 
sas City, Mo. 

District No. 8, J. Will Blackman, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

District No. 9, H. H. Collier, S. 
Tacoma, Wash. 

District No. 10, John S. Martin, 
Port Dover, Ont., Canada. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

The classified advertisers In P'>n.TRY 
KEEPER are coining money fast this year. 
It pays to keep your announcement before 
the people. That is the way to establish 
a reputation for your business. Why not 
go after the people, get good prices, and 
make more money this year? 

BATES 

Rates for Ads. Classified under proper 
Headings are as follows: 

1 month _ 6c per word 

2 months -. 11 c per word 

3 months 16c per word 

4 months 20c per word 

1 year - 50c per word 



Watch!; 




Success in raising the chicks you 
depends most largely on feed and car 
in the first 10 days. 

F.P.G. Chick Manna 

For Chicks, Turkeys, Pheasants 

proved its wonderful merit in 1884. Since 
then we have watched quality. Quality* 
QUALITY, — regardless of cost. Only best 
cereals, animal food, etc. ; no seconds. 
Wholesome as your own food. 

F. P. C. Chick Manna is not the cheap- 
est feed; it can't be. But it will sava 
the chicks. At dealers or write us. Satis- 
faction or money back. 



Box 30 



F. P. CASSEL'S SON 

Lansdale, Pa. 



HEMSTITCHING 



and picoting attach- 
ment Avorlcs on any 
sewing machine, easily adjusted. Trice $2.50 
with full instructions. 

ORIENTAL NOVELTY CO., 
Box 11. Corpus Christi, Texas 



BREEDER'S CARDS. 



ANCONAS 



SING-LE COMB ANCONAS— Few large, dark, 
vigorous, heavy laying hens for sale at $3.00 
apiece. Shipped on approval. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. No hatching eggs this year. F. 
Raymond Benson, Elgin, HI. 



S. C. ANCONA EGGS FOR HATCHING— from 

selected stock $3.00 per 15. From range flock 
$2.00. Fine stock for sale reasonable. Joseph 
A. Triplett. Egg Harbor City, N. J. 3-4 

SHATTO'S SINGLE COMB ANCONAS— Baby 
chicks from winners. Hoganized layers. Vac- 
cinated against disease. Ten years breeding 
Anconas. Satisfied customers everywhere. Guy 
H. Shatto, Dunkirk, Ind. 3-4 



ROSE COMB ANCONA STOCK FOR SALE— 

Cheap for quality. Eggs $2.25, $5.00. $10.00 for 
15. 100-$9.00. Chicks 20c, 100-$18.00. Mrs. E. 
J. Crawford, Owatonna, Minn. 



BUTTERCUPS 



BUTTERCUPS— Blue Ribbon Winners: great 
layers, delicious meat. Sheppard's Anconas. 
Chicks, eggs. A. Wermerskirchen, Hokah, Minn. 



BABY CHICKS 



BABY CHICKS — from Hoganized. standard bred 
flocks, Barred Rocks, White Rocks, R. I. Reds, 
White Wyandottes, Buff Orpingtons. Anconas 
and White Leghorns, $10.50 up. Send for Cata- 
log. Sieb's Hatchery, Lincoln, 111. 



500,000 — Day-old to four weeks chicks. Single 
combed White and Brown Leghorns. Barred 
Rocks. Hatching eggs. Failing Poultry Farm, 
Lafargeville, N. Y. 4-3 



CHICKS— C. O. D. Parcel Post. 2000 miles. 
Pay on arrival at your Post Office. Bargain 
prices. My 17th year. Literature free. C. M. 
Lauver, Box 68, McAlisterville. Pa. 3-6 



LOOK (100,000 12c AND UP) CHICKS— Best 
bred-to-lay, profit paying kind only. 20 varieties. 
Hatching eggs. Ducklings. Catalog. Beckman 
Hatchery. 26 E. Lvon, Grand Rapids. Mich. 2-5 



BABY CHICKS — Ten leading varieties from pure 
bred, large range, properly culled utility stock. 
Prices right. Circular free. Modern HatcbTv 
Mt. Blanchard, Ohio. 1-6 



BABY CHICKS— Capacity 100.000. Headquar- 
ters for Rocks. T-eghorns, Minorcas. R*'ds, W. 
Wyandottes and Broilers, 11c up. Order early. 
Catalogue free, postage prepaid. SUnnyslde 
Hatchery, Liverpool, Pa., C. J. Strawser, Prop. 

1-6 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 15 



BREEDER'S CARDS 



BABY CHICKS 



BABY CHICKS— Half Million for 1922. TwelTe 
leading pure breeds from heavy egg producing 
strains. Alive delivery guaranteed. Catalog. 
Smith Brothers Hatcheries, Mexico, Mo. 1-9 



BANTAMS 



BANTAMS AND EGGS— 22 Varieties . 2c stamp 
for circular. Fenn Bantam Yards, (Desk 77), 
Uelavan, Wis. 



BEAHMAS 



LIGHT BRAHMAS— Hatching eggs, Pen 1, 
.$2.50; Pen 2, $2.00 per 15. Solum Bros., Wood- 
ville, Wis. 5-2 

LIGHT BRAHMA'S HATCHING EGGS— $3.00 
per 15, prepaid and insured. Mrs. Burchell, 
Rossnioyne, Ohio. 

LIGHT BEAHMAS— Cavey Farm, Elkhorn, Wis 

12-12 

CANAEIES 

CANARIES — Beautiful Roller Singers $7.00. 
Females $3.00, Breeding cages $6.00. Parrots, 
Finches. Monkeys. Fei-d. Sudow, 1026 West 24th, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 0-3 



DUCKS AND GEESE 



MAMMOTH PEKIN EGGS— Forty $5.00; 100- 
$8.00. Mrs. Frank Spurling, Forest Park, 111. 

5-1 

HORTON'S HIGH QUALITY FAWN AND 

■White Indian Runner duck eggs for hatching. 
Sylvan View Poultry Farm, Curryvllle, Mo. 2-5 

EGGS— Mammoth Pekin 50-$o.00, 100-$8.00. 
■White Holland also Bourbon Red Turkeys 10- 
$8.00. Mrs. Frank Spurling, Forest Park, 111. 

8-4 



FAVOEOLLES 



WHITE FAVEEOLLES — Foremost utility fowls. 
Greatest winter layers. Develop quickly. Eggs 
and chicks from prize winners. Pixley, R. 2, 
Wayne, Mich. 3-4 



BLACK LANGSHANS 



BIG BLACK LANGSHANS — Setting $2.50, 100- 
$10.00. 100 Chix $25.00. Ella Whitwood, Hud- 
son, 111. 



LEGHORNS 



300 SINGLE COMB WHITE AND BROWN LEG- 

horns. 1 year hens, cockerels, pullets. Hatching 
eggs. A. ' Schroeder, St. Peter, 111. 12-12 



WHITE LEGHORNS 



PURE BARRON S. C. W. LEGHORNS— 290 egg 
strain. Egas 4c each, Chicks 12%c, 8-weeks 
cockerels $1.00. Mrs. F>. E. Nail, Lewistown, 
Mo. 

10,000 CHICKS EACH WEEK— May prices, 
Grade A $18, Grade B $15. June and later all 
grades Chicks at $10 per 100, Eggs $6. Pedi- 
greed, Trap-nested, Imported Barron stock with 
no hen under 248-egg record in six years 
breeding. Also D. W. Young S. C. White Leg- 
horns, direct, separate. Our customers say we 
have Best stock in America. Catalog. 8,000 
early pullets, $1.50 each. Brownstown Poultry 
Farm, Brownstown, Indiana. 5-3 

WE ARE PREPARED TO MAKE IMMEDIATE 

shipment of Single Comb White Leghorn English 
strain hatching eggs from stock whose records 
run from 210 to 300 eggs per year, $2.50 per 
15, $1.00 per hundred, all eggs carefully se- 
lected and candled. Prompt shipment guar- 
anteed. Lewis A. Daily, McLeansboro, 111. 5-2 

PULLETS, BABY CHICKS— If you want Leg- 
horns of Superior Quality, Kuhn has them at 
let live prices. Be wise and write Kuhn be- 
fore you buy. H. M. Kuhn, Sycamore, Ohio. 4-3 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORN EGGS FOR HATCH- 

ing, $2.00 per 15. Pen 1, $5.00 per 50. Mrs. 
Ellen E. Omans, Frazee, Minn. 

SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORN EGGS FOR 

hatching. Flock 1— $2.00 per 15; $10.00 per 
100. Flock 2—51.25 per 15; $5.00 per 100. J. 
R. Frew, Eustls, Nebr. 

BEOWN LEGHOENS 

S. C. DARK BROWN LEGHORNS — Eggs only. 
6c each delivered. Willis Fairbanks, Mora, 
Minn. 

W. W. KULP, BOX 30, POTTSTOWN, PA 

The leaders In size and contest winners. Cata- 
log. Both combs. 



| BREEDER'S CARDS | 
o o 

BLACK LEGHOENS 

100 BLACK LEGHOEN CHIX $20.00; 500, 
$95.00. Ella Whitwood, Hudson, HI, 

BUFF LEGHOENS 

SINGLE COMB BUFF LEGHOENS— Solid buff. 
Heavy layers. Eggs from special pens $1.25 
per 15, $6.00 per 100. Arthur Worthington, 
Two Rivers, Wis. 

SPECIALLY BRED MANY GENERATIONS — 

for stamina, large yield of big eggs, and beauty. 
1 have the goods. Both combs. Eggs, hens and 
pens reasonable. Catalog. Joseph Benedict, 
Chevy Chase, Maryland. 

MINOECAS 



BLACK MINOECAS. BUFF OEPINGTONS. 

Eggs. Ten varieties baby chicks. Frank A. 
Agnew, Southside, Omaha, Nebr. 3-4 

GIANT SINGLE COMB BLACK MINOECAS — 

Setting $3.00; 100-$L2.00. Ella Whitwood, Hud- 
son, HI. 

EOSE COMB WHITE MINOECAS— 30 eggs, pre- 
paid, $4. H. L. Carson, Middleport, Ohio. 3-5 

BLUE OEPINGTONS 

LOOK — Royal Bine Orpingtons. Winners. John 
Unangst, 1214 Prairie Ave., Freeport, m. 3-12 

WHITE ORPINGTONS 

S. C. WHITE ORPINGTON EGGS — Heavy lay- 
ers, $1.50 per 15; $7.00 per 100. Elva Cantwell, 
Bucklin, Mo. 3-4 

BUFF OEPINGTONS 

BUFF ORPINGTON HATCHING EGGS — Re- 
duced prices. Write for free mating list. 
Walter Goessling, 930 Jefferson St., Quincy, 111. 

5-2 

EHODE ISLAND EEDS 

EOSE COMB RHODE ISLAND RED EGGS — 

$1.00 per 15, $6.00 per 100. Bred to lay. Mrs. 
Joe Walz, Glen Haven, Wis. 4-3 

REDS THAT LAY! The strain that pays. 
Rose Comb. Eggs. Circular. Albert Bern- 
hardt, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. 

SINGLE ALSO EOSE COMB EEDS— Setting 
$1.50, 100-$7.00. 100 chix $20.00. Ella Whit- 
wood, Hudson, HI. 

EOSE COMB EED EGGS — From prize winners 
and record layers. (Bean strain.) Mating list. 
Daugherty's Poultry Farm, Metcalf. HI. 8-2 

EOSE COMB EEDS— Bean strain. Exhibition 
quality. Trapnested ten years, yearly records 
to 306 eggs. Three pens, eggs 25, 20, 15 cents 
each. Jos. Forge, Burlington, Wise. 

PHEASANTS 



$9.00 PER POUND for pheasants. Easy raised. 
Great demand. Complete book breeding 36 var- 
ieties: Pheasants. Peafowl. Illustrated natural 
colors $1.00. Colored catalog: 400 varieties 30c. 
Bargains. Lowest prices. All kinds Wild Game, 
Turkeys, Quail, Peafowl, Pigeons, Pet Stock, 
Poultry, Waterfowl. Eggs for hatching. Ex- 
changes made. (1000 Pheasants. Eggs — want- 
ed.) U. Pheasantrv, 1026 West 24th, Los 
Angeles, Calif. 6-3 

RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS— $5 for 15, post 
paid. Charles Knecht, 1715 N. 13th St., Kansas 
City, Kans. 3-4 

PIGEONS 



OFFER — mated Homers, $2.00 pair. Beauti- 
White Homers, $3.00 pair. Get my prices 
on Runts, Carneaux, Maltese Hens. Free book- 
let. Squab Mannual 50c. Charles B. Gilbert, 
2210 Almond St., Philadelphia, Pa. 10-6 

WHITE EOCKS 



SNYDEE'S WHITE PLYMOUTH EOCKS— Eggs 
$2.00 a setting from No. 1 Pens. Dellwood 
Poultry Yards, A. S. Snyder, Dellwood, N. Y. 

4-3 

BAEEED EOCKS 



"CACKLEES" AEE PUEEBEED BEED-TO-LAY 

Barred Rocks. Trapnested by Geo. W. Pratt, 
Cropsey, HI. 18 eggs $2.50; 36-S4.50, 72-$8.00, 
100-$10.00, prepaid. Circular free. Stock all 
sold. 2-12 



| BREEDER'S CARDS | 

o — o 

BAEEED ROCKS 

PARKS ROCKS— Eggs that will hatch. Cata- 
log. W. W. Kulp, Box 30, Pottstown, Pa. 

MY VICTORY STRAIN OF BARRED ROCKS— 

Won at Toledo, O., Nov. 29th to Dec. 4th, 1921. 
3, 4, 5, Ex Cock; 2 Ex Cockerel; 1, 2, Ex Hen; 
3 Ex Pullet; 1, 2, Pullet Bred Cock; 2 Cock- 
erel Bred Pen; Silver Medal for Best Display. 
Barred Rock Club shape and color specials. 
Send for photo of my winning birds. J. T. 
French, 838 West Grove Place, Toledo, Ohio. 

SEVERAL VARIETIES 

57 VARIETIES — Purebred and prize winning 
Chickens, Ducks, Geese, Turkeys, Pheasants, Fox 
Terrier Pups, Stock, Eggs. Reasonable prices. 
Write your wants. Peter Bros., Randolph, 
Minn. ■ 

450 VARIETIES: Wild Game, Peafowl, Pig- 
eons, Pheasants, Rabbits, Wild Turkeys, Ban- 
tams, Poultry, Quail, Deer, Wild Geese. Col- 
ored Price Catalog 50c. TJ. Pheasantry, 1026 
AVest 24th, Los Angeles, Calif. 6-3 

SINGLE COMB REDS $1.50 SETTING— Exhibi- 
tion S. O. White Leghorns $1.50 setting. Wild 
Mallards $3 setting. English Callers $5 set- 
ting. Prepaid. O. Robey, Maryrille, Mo. 3-4 

SHEPPAED S. C. ANCONA AND PENNSYL- 

vania S. C. W. Leghorn eggs for hatching, 
$2.50 per 15. H. E. Ritter, Middleburg, Pa. 

HAEEY SWINBUENE, DELHI, IOWA OF- 

fers 137 varieties poultry, pheasants, ducks, 
geese, eggs. 3-4 

EGGS — Brahmas, Langshans, Rocks, Reds. Orp- 
ingtons, Wydts., $1.50 per 15 prep'd. Ducks, 
geese. Catalogue free. M. H. Myers, Edom, Va. 

3-4 

TURKEYS 

WILD TURKEYS. $28.50 pair. S4.75 setting. 
Bronze, Holland. Burbon S4.00 setting. Ferd. 
Sudow, 102G West 24th, Los Angeles, Calif. 6-3 

EGGS FROM HIGH CLASS OLD STOCK— Mam- 
oth AVhite Holland, Mamoth Bronze and Bour- 
bon- Red. Ten $S.00: Twenty $15.00; Thirty 
$19.00. Mrs. Frank Spurling, Forest Park, ni. 

5-4 

BRONZE GOBBLERS $10— Eggs 10 for $6.00, 
prepaid. Order now. Aaron J. Felthouse, 
Goshen, Ind. 2-6 

WHITE WYANDOTTES 

EGGS — From White Wvandottes that stav white. 
$2.00 per 15; $4.00 per 50. Clay Hill Poultry 
Farm, Fulton, Iowa. 5-2 

POULTRY SHOW 



MADISON SQUARE GAEDEN SHOW— Buyer's 
Guide (list of exhibitors) free. Official Marked 
Catalog 75 cents. Both books very valuable. 
Send for them. Address D. Lincoln Orr, Sec'y, 
Box 23, Orr's Mills — Cornwall, N. Y. 

EEAL ESTATE 

WANT TO HEAE FEOM OWNEE HAVING 

poultry farm or other property for sale. State 
cash price and particulars. John J. Black, 
278th St., Chippewa Falls, Wis. 

POULTRYMAN WANTED 

WANTED: Experienced Poultryroan; single 
man preferred; steady employment; good wages; 
board, room and laundry furnished. Address, Mt. 
Pleasant State Hospital, Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

RADIO FOR EVERYBODY. Learn at home, 
the Construction of Radiophone and Telegraph 
Receivers for Beginners", of 18 chapters, fully 
illustrated. 80 cents post paid. Free catalog's 
of all the latest and best Radio. Automobile, 
Tractor and Electrical books. V. M. Coach; 
Ithaca, N. Y. 

PRINTING 

PRINTING SPECIALS— During .Tune. July. 
August. 100 sheets linen finish note paper and 
100 envelopes both printed with your three line 
advertisement $1.25, 200 note paper and 100 en- 
velopes $1.50 postpaid. Summer sale list brist- 
ling with bargains, for stamp only. Model 
Printing Company, Manchester, Iowa. 

250 ENVELOPES, $1.10; 500-$1.75, POSTPAID. 

Womble Press, Bearcreek, N. C. 5-2 



Growing Profits 

\7"0U never worry a bit about the healthy appetites of your 
chicks when they are growing rapidly. You know you will 
get your money back. It is the slow-growing birds that eat 
holes in your pocket-book. Rapid growth at low cost is always 
the result of proper feeding — and for the half -grown chick, 



that means 



DICKINSON'S 



GLOBE GROWING MASH 

It builds up chicks in a natural way. Easily digested 
and readily assimilated. Contains nourishing animal, 
cereal and vegetable proteins. 

Whether you keep ten or ten thousand chicks, you will find GLOBE 
GROWING MASH economical and satisfactory. It is perfectly balanced, pala- 
table and gives results. You are sure of profits because of the rapid growth and 
perfect health of your flock. The rapid development of the flock with the 
old-time worries removed is a great satisfaction, and you will enjoy it. 

Feed Globe Growing Mash in a hopper; let young fowls have access to it 
at all times. With vigorous exercise they will require much nourishment to 
keep up constant growth, but they will not overfeed. Be sure they exercise. 
That can be induced by scattering Globe Developing 
Scratch in the litter twice daily. They will work for it 
and strengthen their bodies to resist disease. 



l-OO LD9 W 5. t 



It will be only a few weeks before your pullets will be 
ready for Globe Egg Mash — the great egg producer. 

Your dealer carries the full line of Dickinson's 
Poultry Feeds — or he will get them for you if 
you ask. There is no " just-as-good." 

THE ALBERT DICKINSON CO. 
CHICAGO 

Minneapolis Buffalo Boston Baltimore 
New York Pittsburgh 




THE ALBERT DICKINSON Ctt -~ 

CHlCAf.n ILL- - 
_ GUARANTEED ANALYSIS 
"UDE PROTEIN It ^ 

- : £ at a* 

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r«B0 HYDRATES 

•IwLSS 1 ""CO BUTtCtWL>>.S lFT i5*» 
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THE 





A JOURNAL FOR EVERY ONE INTERESTED 
IN MAKING POULTRY PAY DEVOTED PARTIC- 
ULARLY TO PRACTICAL POULTRY KEEPING* 




Wipe Out Every 
Rat and Mouse 




Smaller Capacity Incubator Added to 
Famous Buckeye Mammoth Line. 

The remarkable success of the 
"vertical type" Mammoth Incubators 
brought out by The Buckeye Incu- 
bator Company four years ago, be- 
wail with their famous 10,368 egg 
machine. 

This type of incubator was a radi- 
cal departure from former practice, 
not only from the standpoint of gen- 
eral design, the arrangement of the 
trays and the unique and efficient 
egg-turning device but also from the 
ability to maintain precisely the 
same temperature throughout the in- 
terior of the incubator with perfect 
ventilation, doing away entirely with 
the operation of cooling the eggs. 

Later it was recognized that some 
hatcheries required a machine of less 
height than that needed for the No. 
7, for which a ten-foot ceiling is 
necessary. This led to the develop- 
ment of the Buckeye No. 8, a 4608- 
egg incubator, worked out on pre- 
cisely the same principles. 

These machines have proven so ad- 
vantageous, both in the matter of 
high average hatching and in the 
high quality of chicks that a new 
model, No. 9, with 2304-egg capacity 
has just been brought out, adapted 
particularly to the needs of smaller 
hatcheries and specialty breeders. 

One of the prinicpal features of 
this vertical type of Mammoth incu- 
bators is the space-saving advantage. 
This new No. 9 machine is eight feet 
long, three and a half feet wide and 
five feet, eight inches high. Even 
the large machine only occupies a 
space eight and a half feet square. 

One great advantage of this in- 
cubator is that the operator may 
place eggs in this machine at any 
time that suits his convenience. The 



specialty breeders who may desire to 
set his eggs every day and up to 
once a week will find this incubator 
particular desirable as it enables 
him to set his eggs while they are 
perfectly fresh and separate the eggs 
and chicks from each specially-mated 
pen. 

The general principles of the ver- 
tical design are exactly the same as 
those of the larger machines. 

The illustration shows the new No. 
9, Buckeye Incubator with the doors 
open at one end. Both ends are pre- 
cisely alike in construction and ca- 
pacity. The eggs are held in twenty- 
four turning trays, each holding 
ninety-six eggs. In addition there 
are eight hatching trays. Note that 
all trays are equipped with record- 
card holders. The entire operation 
of turning the eggs in this machine 
will require less than three minutes. 

The cold-rolled copper boiler and 
cast-iron radiator used in this ma- 
chine are of the same quality used 
in the larger units. The tempera- 
ture, ventilation and moisture are 
maintained at exact balance by the 
perfect operation of the thermostat 
and two specially designed, horizon- 
tal electric fans. 

For further particulars address 
The Buckeye Incubator Company of 
Springfield, Ohio. 



TT/EKEYS: THEIE CAEE AND MANAGEMENT 



Some of tlie most successful breeders and com- 
mercial growers In the Country tell of the 
methods by which they have accomplished their 
successes, and what they have done others also 
can do. If you raise turkeys in any number, 
this book wiil be worth many times its price 
to you. 

Beautifully illustrated, one color plate, PR 
pages, 9 by 12 Inches. Price 7no. postpaid. 
Address Poultry Kepper. Onlncy. Illinois. 



Amazing New Discovery Quickly Kills 
Them All. Not a Poison. 



Rats, Mice, Gophers— in fact all Rodents can 
now be wiped out easily and quickly. Imperial 
Virus will do it. This new discovery, is a 
fluid, true Virus. Entirely harmless to hu- 
mans, poultry, stock, pets, etc. 




Infects Rodents only. Greedily eaten on bait 
Sets up burning fever. The pests communicate 
it to others, and all die outside, hunting air 
and water. Imperial Virus is put up in seated 
bottles, thus insuring full strength and potency. 
Only safe, sanitary method to overcome these 
pests. Protect your Poultry, especially Bai>y 
Cliieks and Egg Hatches. 

YOU CAN GET YOURS FREE 

Here's how! Send Si. 00 today (eurrencv. 
M. O. Checks, etc) and we will give you 
Ny return mail, postpaid, two regular, full 
sized (double strength) SI. 00 bottles of Im- 
perial A'irus. Use one to rid your place of 
these _ pests, and sell the other to a neighbor, 
thus getting yours free. Special inducement to 
represent us. 

If more convenient, send no money, just 
your name and address to Imperial Labora- 
tories, Dept 841, 2110 Grand Ave.. Kansas 
City, Mo., Pay postman $1.00 and few cents 
postage when two bottles arrive. Guaranteed 
to do the work to your entire satisfaction 
within 30 days or your $1.00 will be cheer- 
fully refunded. 



KILL THEM ALL 

Every Rat and Mouse easily des- 
troyed by New Discovery 
Not a Poison 



Absolute freedom from rats and mice is now- 
assured everyone. No more trapping and pois- 
oning just a few. Clean out the whole bunch, 
old, young, big and little. 




Hick's Rat Killer kills every rat or mouse 
on your place. Most wonderful of all it does 
not harm anything but rats, mice, gophers, 
and other rodents. It is harmless to children, 
pets, poultry and all kinds of stock. It can 
he spread anywhere and will kill only rats 
and mice. This deatli bringing disease rapidly 
spreads and quickly destroys all the rats and 
mice. There is no smell or odor for they run 
outside for water and die away from the 
building. 

A Trial Costs You Nothing- 
Mr. Hick is offering everyone troubled with 
these pests the chance to get rid of them 
at no cost to themselves. He will send three 
large double strength, one dollar bottles for 
the price of one. You keep one for yourself: 
the other two you sell to your neighbors at 
one dollar each, thus getting your own free 
and in addition making a dollar profit. Send 
$1.00 today (currency, money order, check, 
etc.) to Chas. H. Hick & Co., Dept. 1305. 
101S S. Wabash Ave.. Chicago, 111. If you 
prefer, send no money, just your name and 
address and pay postman $1.00 and postage 
on delivery. If after two weeks trial yon 
are not absolutely satisfied, write Mr. Hick 
and your money will be refunded. 



THE 




A JOURNAL FOR 
EVERYONE 
I NTE RE ST ELD 




KEEPER 



N MAKING 
POULTRY 
P A V 



Vol. XXXIX 



JULY, 1922 



No. 4 



The Most Profitable Breed 



Each year the writer receives 
hundreds of questions pertaining to 
the keeping of poultry and no ques- 
tion is asked so often as, "What is 
the most profitable breed of poul- 
try for me to keep?" This question 
is sometimes looked upon as sort of 
a joke but to the beginner it is a 
very serious matter and one which 
should be answered as carefully as 
possible. Many times the future suc- 
cess of a young breeder is deter- 
mined by the breed which he selects 
and undertakes to keep. Should he 
make a mistake in his selection, he 
may lay the foundation for a dismal 
failure and eventually he will become 
one of that army of knockers which 
says that "chickens don't pay." 

In order to fully understand this 
question we must divide the breeds 
into three sections. First we will 
have the Egg Breeds consisting of 
the smaller breeds such as the Medi- 
terraneans, second we will have the 
General Purpose Breeds such as the 
American Class and some of the Eng- 
lish Class and lastly the Asiatic 
Class. The Asiatic Class being large- 
ly a meat proposition, we will not 
consider it in the present article and 
yet we do not want to be understood 
as saying that it is not a profitable 
proposition. The majority of our 
readers are not in the poultry busi- 
ness for the meat side of the ques- 
tion so we will leave that for some 
future discussion. Some excellent 
writers and well known breeders 
have taken sides on the question as 
to which breed is the most profitable 
and have emphasized either one side 
or the other so strongly that they 
have entirely overlooked fairness to 
their brother breeders and have real- 
ly done nothing to help the cause of 
better poultry.. Above all we must 
not lose sight of the fact that abso- 
lute fairness should always be upper- 
most in our minds in dealing with 
this subject and we will try to give 
you as broad a view of the matter 
as possible. 

No breed is perfect. It sometimes 
seems when we read the advertise- 
ments or mating lists that the acme 



By F. RAYMOND BENSON 

of perfection has been reached but 
that time has not yet been reached 
and we will never see the absolutely 
perfect bird. As we improve and 
reach out towards our Standard, we 
move the requirements ahead' of us 
so that Ave are constantly striving to 
produce a better fowl. Thus it ever 
will be. Let us lay aside our whims 
and see what about the cost of feed, 
housing and labor will be and then 
look to the amount received for com- 
mercial eggs, or hatching eggs and 
market fowls. This will be the test 
by which we will judge the different 
breeds and we can then determine 
which breed will pay us the greatest 
dividends for after all that is the su- 
preme test of any breed. We all 
know in a general way that a Leg- 
horn which will represent the Egg 
Breeds, will eat less than a Rock 
which stands for the General Pur- 
pose Breeds. It goes without an ar- 
gument that a four pound hen will 
not need as much for bodily upkeep 
as a seven pound hen. We believe 
we are safe in saying that the feed 
for the Egg Breeds will be about 
twenty-five per cent less than the bill 
for eats for the General Purpose 
Breeds. This will include the cost 
to grow as well as the needs to main- 
tain a fowl. This is indeed quite a 
difference and for those who find it 
necessary to confine their fowls to 
small quarters and to buy all their 
feed, it becomes quite an item. Ar- 
gue as we may this fact is staring 
us in the face at all times and we 
must admit it. 

The cost of housing is another 
item which must be solved and here 
again it seems as if the smaller 
breeds had the best of the argument. 
The writer believes that four square 
feet is sufficient for each Leghorn 
when kept in flocks of say one hun- 
dred fowls. The smaller number you 
keep the greater must be the floor 
space per fowl. The larger breeds 
do better when given an extra 
foot of space and this runs up 
the cost of housing considerably. You 
can keep one hundred Leghorns in a 
house where but seventy-five or 



eighty Rocks would get along. 

Now we come to the question of 
caring for the flock. Of course in 
the back-yard flock this is not a 
very serious matter but the big- 
breeder finds that labor is an im- 
portant item and must be figured 
closely. It will take no more labor 
to care for a large fowl than it will 
for a small bird but the fact that 
larger houses are required for larg- 
er breeds means more steps will be 
taken and while it is not a big item, 
yet it does count up if the poultry 
farm is doing business on a big scale. 

In the beginning of any business 
venture we want to know what it 
will be necessary to invest in order 
to give the business a good start and 
we find in this case that larger hous- 
es mean a larger investment of capi- 
tal. If it costs say $1500 for a house 
for our Leghorns, it will cost about 
$2000 for a house for the same num- 
ber of Rocks. The initial outlay 
for buildings will be less with the 
smaller breeds. So it is with the 
fowls themselves, should we purch- 
ase them we will find the larger 
birds will cost more to buy them. 

Up to this point we presume that 
the advocate of the smaller breeds 
has been smiling to himself and 
thinking that it was all clear sailing. 
However in order to be perfectly 
fair in this matter we must state the 
facts and we must admit that while 
the small breeds have the best of 
the, matter so far, yet it will be a 
different story from now on. Did 
you ever notice that you can buy 
a bunch of White Leghorns chicks 
for less than you can Barred Rock 
chicks? Why is this and how will 
it affect our discussion? In the 
first place we believe this is due to 
the high fertility of the Leghorn 
eggs. This is a point in their favor 
apparently but on the other hand the 
fact that the chicks are cheaper is a 
decided point against them. We like 
to see high fertility but when the 
chicks will not command a good 
price it becomes a question after all 
whether this high fertility is not a 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Page Number 4 

POULTRY KEEPER 

Quincy, Illinois 
401 Hampshire Street 
A Journal fer Everyone Interested In Making 
Poultry Pay. 
Issued the First of Each Month 

Subscription Price: 
50c a year; Single Copies, 5c 
Foreign Postage: Twenty-five Cents a Year 
Additional. 

Entered at the Quincy, m., Post Office as 
Second Class Matter. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Money 
Order, Express Order or Registered Letters. 
Small sums will be accepted in United States 
one or two cent postage stamps. 

Change of address — When this is desired, be 
sure to give old and new Post Office addresses. 

All subscribtions Invariably discontinued at 
expiration. Subscribers will confer a favor by 
reporting to us irregularities In receiving the 
Poultry Keeper. 

Advertising rates made known on application. 

Poultry Keeper readers are cordially invited 
to express their opinion on any subject of 
poultry that will be of interest to our readers,, 
give helpful talks to the inexperienced and ask 
Questions In any department. 

A. OTIS ARNOLD, Editor. 

F. RAYMOND BENSON, Ass't Editor. 



THE PUBLISHER OF THIS 

MAGAZINE IS A 

LIFE MEMBER OF THE 

American Poultry Association 



EVERYONE GETS ONE 



To publish a paper like POULTRY 
KEEPER demands a great deal of 
money and of course that means we 
must have a large list of subscribers. 
Without subscribers we would not be 
able to get along for they are the 
very life blood of a paper. 

Keeping this in mind it is our con- 
stant aim and endeavor to get new 
subscribers but especially to keep 
them after we get them. We plan 
in getting out POULTRY KEEPER 
to give you such information and ad- 
vice as will enable you to make your 
poultry profitable and to encourage 
you eventually to become an adver- 
tiser. This means nothing if it does 
not mean that we must have your 
good will and co-operation. We can- 
not run a paper alone and it would 
be difficult for you to get the re- 
quired knowledge without a paper. 
So it resolves itself into a mutual as- 
sociation between the publisher and 
reader. We will try to serve you as 
well as we can and we feel sure our 
readers will be glad to help us by 
boosting POULTRY KEEPER when- 
ever occasion may present itself. 

Speak a good word for our paper 
— your paper — and send in a new 
subscription for us if you can. If 
every subscriber will get one new 
subscriber — well we could get out a 
still better and more interesting pa- 
per for you. A boost for POULTRY 
KEEPER is a boost for yourself and 
we feel sure you will be glad to co- 
operate with us in this matter. Re- 
member that we will send POULTRY 
KEEPER three full years for a 
dollar. 



SUMMER SALES 



Almost every breeder plans to sell 
some of his breeding stock during 
the summer. This is partly because 
he is through with hatching for the 
year and rather needs the money but 
we also find that many breeders are 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 

handicapped for room and must get 
the old stock out of the way and 
thereby make room for the young 
birds which are coming along. Dur- 
ing the summer breeders are willing 
to make some concessions in price in 
order to sell and it is an ideal time 
to buy stock, either as a start or for 
new blood. It is reasonable to sup- 
pose one will sell cheaper at this 
time of the year for he will save 
carrying the birds over the winter 
and then he probably needs the room 
and doesn't have the money to build 
additional buildings and even if he 
had the money it is probably a 
money making proposition to cut the 
price and get some of the fowls out 
of the way. 

Should you contemplate the purch- 
ase of breeding stock before next 
spring we suggest that you make in- 
quiries at this time and save thereby. 

While the desire to save is to be 
lauded, yet do not make the fatal 
mistake of expecting something for 
nothing. No breeder can give you 
that and should you expect it, you 
will be greatly disappointed. 

PLAN YOUR ADVERTISING 
NOW 



This is the time to plan your fall 
advertising campaign, if you have 
not already done so. Advertise- 
ments should be written and placed 
in the different papers and don't for- 
get POULTRY KEEPER when you 
place your advertisements. Even a 
small ad is sure to bring results and 
with our large and growing circula- 
tion you will find it to your advan- 
tage to run as large an ad as pos- 
sible. 

Some breeders do not plan their 
advertising with the result that the 
other fellow gets most of the orders. 
Successful breeders plan their busi- 
ness months ahead and eliminate 
guess work and uncertaintity as 
largely as possible. Even the small 
breeder who has but a limited 
amount of money to spend on ad- 
vertising will find it wisdom to lay 
out their appropriations with care 
and we sometimes feel that if any- 
one needs to use judgement in this 
matter it is the small advertiser. 

Advertising is the heart of the 
poultry business and no matter 
whether you have a dozen or a 
thousand fowls to dispose of, you 
must advertise to sell them. It is 
not always the large ad which gets 
the best results but taken in a gener- 
al way it pays to carry as large an ad 
as you can. But above all things 
keep the ad running and keep pound- 
ing away with it. Just because you 
don't get a dozen orders a day don't 
stop the\ ad. Rather look and see 
what is the matter with the ad that 
it does not interest the readers and 
get the inquiry desired. 



THE REVISION COMMITTEE 



At a meeting of the Revision Com- 
mittee it was decided that the Rhode 
Island Whites, the Black Jersey 
Giants and the Rose Comb Barred 
Rocks be not recommended for ad- 
mission into the Standard of Perfec- 
tion. We believe that the Committee 
acted in good faith but we doubt its 



wisdom. There are thousands of 
breeders of the above mentioned 
breeds who feel that their particular 
breed has fully as much right to 
recognition as the Chanticleer and it 
certainly looks as if they had a 
mighty good argument to say the 
least. 

Personally the writer is not inter- 
ested in this beyond the fact that we 
want every breed to get a square 
deal. We cannot see the logic or 
fairness in keeping some of the dead 
timber in the Standard which is now 
present and refusing as popular and 
worthy a breed as the Rhode Island 
Whites. We have heard objections 
such as the fact that the Rhode Is- 
land Whites are too near the shape 
of the White Rocks. As we under- 
stand the shape of a Red and Rock 
there is quite a difference and all 
we have to say is that if a man can- 
not tell them apart, then he better 
study the Standard shapes a little. 

This matter will come up at the 
American Poultry Association Con- 
vention and we believe that this 
meeting will give every breed a fair 
and square deal. We urge breeders 
to trust the Association to do this 
until it has been proven that it will 
not do so. Reserve judgement until 
the Association is given a chance to 
make good. The majority of breed- 
ers are level headed but a few wish 
to do something rash and we be- 
speak thoughtfulness and careful- 
ness at this time or perhaps the As- 
sociation may crumble under our 
very eyes. 



THE BROODY HEN 



A very common mistake is to pun- 
ish the broody hen which one wishes 
to break off the inclination to set. 
Water is sometimes refused and food 
is often kept away from them. This 
is inhuman and far from the best 
method. We remember having a 
neighbor who used to almost drown 
the hen in her attempt to stop her 
setting. If one treatment did not 
do the trick she would repeat the 
abuse several times. Such methods 
are wrong. They injure the hen 
physically and do not gain the de- 
sired result. Put the hen in a coop 
which has a slatted floor and is 
raised off the ground, so that when 
it attempts to warm something it will 
meet with failure. She will soon 
give up the job and be back to lay- 
ing. Food and water is given and 
especially green food such as weeds 
from the garden or lawn clippings. 
Place the box in the shade under a 
tree and treat her well and you will 
not lower her vitality and conse- 
quently she will be in good shape for 
her duty at the nest. It is a good 
plan to confine a hen the day she 
shows her first inclination to set. 
Break her at the start. In all 
events treat her well and do not 
abuse her. 



MISSIONARY WORK 



Poultrymen are too prone to ex- 
pect immediate returns from their 
labors. We want to see dollars and 
cents coming out of every investment 
but we are going to tell you of an 
investment from which you may not 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 5 




receive any money but which will 
pay other dividends and perhaps 
they are greater than money can buy. 

We have a little neighbor girl who 
is greatly interested in our poultry 
and the few pigeons we keep for 
pleasure. She is too small to go to 
school and wanted to spend all her 
time watching our feathered fowls. 
In fact, she has spent about all the 
time her mother will allow her to 
spend, among our birds. Yesterday 
we offered her a pair of pigeons on 
condition that her father would 
build a suitable place for them. Her 
joy was unconfined and today her 
father is staying home from his la- 
bors in the Windy City, in order that 
his little girl may have the pigeons 
and a place for them. Past exper- 
ience tells us that this little girl will 
not soon forget but will become even 
more interested and who can say but 
what as the years pass she may be- 
come a successful poultrywoman A 
Pair of pigeons, a couple of "Ban- 
ties" or even some larger fowls— 
what would that mean to you and 
yet it means a world to the small 
child and may be the beginning of 
another poultry breeder and we can 
well afford to do this missionary 
work with the positive assurance 
tnat the seed is well sown. 



ILLINOIS POULTRY BREEDERS 



Entry blanks for the next Illinois 
i^gg Laying Contest at Quincy Illi- 
nois and Murphysboro, Illinois will 
be ready for mailing shortly after 
July 1st. We are in hopes that the 
breeders of poultry in Illinois will 
take advantage of this opportunity 
to show the world that Illinois birds 
have their share of utility values 
The leading pen in the contest today 
is well over the 200 eggs per year 
average, and we sincerely hope that 
the records at the end of the year 
will surprise the breeders. With two 
years experience, we hope to even 
better the records of this year and 
no better advertising can be gotten 
than to win at these contests. Win- 
ners of even Fifth monthly prize re- 
port the sale of as many as 2500 
baby chicks in one order and the 
same holds good with all winners 
We will distribute beautiful silver 
cups to the winners of highest pen 
prizes each month, and every bird or 
pen as low as fifth prize will receive 
certificates of awards. Better get 
your name in to C. P. Scott, Chief 
Poultryman, Division of Poultry 
Husbandry, Dept. of Agriculture, 
Springfield, 111., or if you desire you 
may send a check for ten dollars 
payable to C. P. Scott for a pen. No 
one will be allowed to enter more 
than 2 pens of anyone variety at 
either Quincy or Murphysboro. Get 
busy, Illinois breeders and see that 
our state is well represented. — A D 
Smith, Sec. 



DUCKS AND GEESE 



This book gives reliable Information and ad- 
vise on breeding ducks and geese for market 
for breeders and exhibitors. It is full of 
practical reliable information. With this book- 
anyone can be successful, almost regardless of 
location Many well-known authorities have 
contributed special articles. 

Well illustrated, 104 pages, 9 by 12 inches. 
Price 75c, postpaid. Address Poultry Keeper, 
Quincy. Illinois. 




How Buckeye Profits Grow 



On June 20, 1921, C. A. Norman 
of Kncxville, Tennessee, wrote 
us concerning his two No. 7 Buck- 
eye Mammoth Incubators: "We 
are hatching from 4600 to 5200 
chicks each week from our two 
machines, which we consider ex- 
cellent, since about 40% of these 
are large breeds. What appeals 
to me is the fact that we are incu- 
bating nearly 2 1,000 eggs with an 
expenditure of about thirty min- 
utes' time daily and at a cost of 
about eight cents per hour." 

Since that time he has doubled 
the original egg capacity of his 
hatchery and will treble it with- 
in another month. 

The Buckeye Mammoth, the real busi- 
ness incubator, absolutely takes the 
speculative element out — by delivering 
unfailingly the highest average hatch 
of strong, healthy chicks. Among the 
more than 800 commercial hatcheries 
using Buckeye Mammoth Incubators 
there is not a single instance of any- 
thing but marked success and profit- 
able growth. 

Whether your hatchery is north, south, 
east or west, no matter what the temper- 
ature or atmospheric conditions, the 



Buckeye Mammoth will give you more 
certain results and make more money 
for you than you ever made before — 
saving half your time and labor and 
occupying about one-fourth the room. 
Ask the Buckeye User— he knows. 
He can virtually "count his chickens 
before they're hatched"— for he knows 
within one to five per cent what his 
hatch will be. And he knows that he 
won't lose one-half cf one per cent in 
shipping. 

We will be glad to send our Buckeye 
Mammoth Catalog, which tells all about 
this remarkable invention. Let us show 
you how to start small and grow big 
in the commercial hatchery business. 

The Buckeye Incubator Co. 

915 Euclid Avenue, Springfield, Ohio 

World's Largest Manufacturers of 
Incubators and Lrcodns 




Buckeye Mammoths bui/t in three sizes: 
No. 7. Capacity . . 10,368 eggs 
No. 8. Capacity . . 4, 600 eggs 
No. 6. Capacity . . 2. 440 eggs 



Buckq 




mammoth 

incubators 



Page Number 6 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 




Over 1,000 Tons of Feed 
a Day Made in This Mill 

Oicier* from poultry raisers who have profited by feeding 
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twice the ordinary egg production. 

Sucrene Buttermilk Chick Mash makes 

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of bowel trouble and develops pullets rapidly to early 

laying maturity. 

Get these twomoney-m airing Sucrene Feeds from your 
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Written by a prominent poultry ex- 
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tineubating-and brooding;de3cribes 
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LEE'S LICE KILLER 

Kills lice, mites, bed buga. etc., affecting poultry. Spray or 
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nro ® 




During the warm weather it is 
especially urgent that the poultry- 
man watch his flock to see that no 
disease gets a start. The food 
should be the best, the drinking 
dishes carefully cleaned each day 
and sufficient shade provided to 
keep the fowls in comfort. Should 
any disease manifest itself be - sure 
to write this Department at once en- 
closing a stamp for personal reply. 



Liver Trouble. 

I have a flock of Rhode Island Reds and have 
lost a few of them. They seem alright, eat well 
and are fat, but upon opening them I found 
the liver was full of hard, yellow spots the 
size of corn. The liver was quite soft. Can 
yon teU me what to do for this trouble? 

A. C, Michigan. 

Overfatness sometimes takes this 
form but it has some of the indica- 
tions of tuberculosis. We would not 
doctor fowls which were afflicted 
with tuberculosis but would kill and 
burn them. For common liver trou- 
bles you might give a half teaspoon- 
ful of Epsom salts in water and re- 
duce the fat forming element in the 
ration. Give more green food. 



Clucks are Crippled. 

Can you tell me through the columns of 
POULTRY KEEPER why it is that my chicks 
are crippled when hatched in the incubator? 
They are unable to handle their legs. 

Mrs. L. J. H., Tennessee. 

This might be caused by too high 
a temperature in the egg chamber or 
weak parent stock might be to 
blame. It would be quite impossible 
for me to name the exact cause with- 
out knowing more details about the 
matter. 



Will They Cross. 

My boy has some Banties and I would like 
to know if they will cross with." my Black Leg- 
horns if I let them run together. 

E. J. K., Wisconsin. 

They will cross. Make a small coop 
for the Bantams and provide a yard 
and keep them separate from the 
balance of your flock. Do not dis- 
courage the boy in his efforts to keep 



LADY PURITAS 




PURITAS SPRINGS 
S. C. W. LEGHORNS^ 

The World's Greatest Layers 

Trapnested for over 10 years without missing 
one day. Every nest on our farm is a trapnest. 
We trapnest every day of every year. 

Big Money In Eggs 



Lady Layer 

Laid 32fe Efcfe» 
One 
Year 




S TO 12 WEEKS OLD PULLETS 

THE LAY IS BRED IN THEM — They are 
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8 TO 12 WEEKS OLD COCKERELS 

PEDIGREED— THEY IXCREASE EGG PRO- 
PU0TIOX. 



There is money in poultry if you have heavy layers, the hens that lay large, white eggs in 
winter. These are the kind that' bring biggest profits; — they are the Puritas Springs kind. Puritas 
Springs Leghorns have been trapnested for so many years that they can't help but lay. We have 
u grand lot of early hatched pullets and cockerels that are waiting for you. If you could see 
them you would want to take them home with you. Please order early as the demand each 
season' is greater than the supply. Send today for our instructive catalog — it tells all about 
our Leghorns and gives prices. 

Puritas Springs Poultry Farm, Box P 111, Avon Lake, Ohio S ^SXIT 



F. Raymond Benson 



poultry, rather encourage him and he 
will eventually want larger fowls. 



Sour Crop. 

We like POULTRY KEEPER just fine and 
especially the Question and Answer Department 
for it has saved us many cliicks. Now can 
you tell us what to do for hens when the 
crop seems full of liquid and is sour smelling. 
Several of our hens have this troube. 

G. L. B. , Blinois. 

We suggest that you add a pinch 
of baking soda to the drinking wa- 
ter, feeding very lightly until the 
fowls are normal. We would keep 
charcoal before the birds at all times. 
Perhaps you feed rather heavily for 
this time of the year or do not give 
a sufficient amount of grit. We 
thank you for your kind words rela- 
tive to this Department. 



Water for Ducks. 

I have heard it said that one could not raise 
ducks unless they had water for the ducks to 
swim in and wonder if that can be true. Can 
you tell me? 

C. G. F.. Ohio. 

Some very successful duck grow- 
ers have only water for drinking 
purposes and we do not believe that 
you need to worry about having wa- 
ter for the ducks to swin in. The 
fact of the matter is that you may 
be able to manage them better with 
out the pond. We all know that 
ducks will swim if given a chance 
but that does not mean that it is 
essential to their welfare. 



Epilepsy. 

I have a few Brown Leghorns and one of 
them was taken in an unusual manner. She 
would be as still as a mouse in a sugar barrel 
and then would squeal and fall with her feet 
up and would act queer and then get up and 
feel better untill she had another spell. She 
seemed crazy to me. Can you help me solve 
this trouble? 

G. M., Mississippi. 

This trouble is probably epilepsy. 
It may be of a nervous origin due 
to too close inbreeding, breeding 
from debilitated birds, or the cause 
may be entirely reflex caused by irri- 
tation of the intestinal tract. If the 
bird continued to have the attacks 
we would not breed from her and 
really the best thing would be to kill 
her. Treatment at best would be 
but an experiment. 



Buff vs. Wliite Leghorns 

Do you believe the Buff Leghorns are as prof- 
itable as the White Leghorns, taking every- 
thing into consideration? 

E. E. K., Indiana. 

Yes. The greatest objection is 
that the buff color is very hard to 
breed and you might have more culls 
than you would have with the white 
but good specimens sell for a round 
figure. We believe the Buffs are 
more inclined to lay a tinted egg 
than the Whites and this is a draw- 
back. The Buffs have a good run- 
ning chance and personally we would 
rather start with them than to fight 
the competition of the White breed- 
ers. 



Sheet Iron House. 

I am thinking of building a sheet iron house 
but before doing so want your advice. Would 
vou say such a house would make a good one? 

E. D. T., Illinois. 

A sheet iron house might be al- 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 7 



right but I am inclined to believe 
that the cost would be much too 
high. You would have to make it 
tight to guard against the cold win- 
ter winds. I had such a house 
which was used as a brood coop and 
it did very well but it cost too much 
to become anything like a popular 
proposition. 



REASONS FOR FEED AND CARE 



Why Not Orpingtons? 

I see but little from your pen about the Or- 
pingtons and as I breed them and know they 
are a worthy fowl I would like to know why 
vou do not boost them? 

W. J. F., New York. 
We have nothing personal against 
the Orpingtons but our American 
markets prefer a yellow skinned and 
yellow shank fowl and as our Amer- 
ican Class fills this requirement and 
the Orpingtons do not, we have 
found that the latter were never as 
popular. I should be very glad to 
join you or any other breeder in 
boosting the Orpingtons but of 
course public needs and require- 
ments cannot be altered to any great 
extent. 



Rye as Poultry Feed. 

I have a considerable amount of rye and 
haTe been trying to get my hens to eat it and 
somehow they don't like it and am sending- you 
a sample to see if you can tell me whether 
it is alright. 

L. M., Indiana. 

Poultry does not like rye as a gen- 
eral rule. You might try pouring 
boiling water over it and see if this 
would help matters but really we 
think it would be better to stick to 
wheat, corn and oats and sell the 
rye. 



Fertilizing the Eggs. 

A discussion has arisen among a few of lis 
as to whether the service of a male makes sev- 
eral eggs fertile or does it require a separate 
service for each egg? 

One service fertilizes several eggs 
when the hen is laying right along. 
Otherwise the vitality would become 
exhausted and each egg might re- 
quire a service. 



Ask Him, Not Us 

Why is it that E. B. Thompson did not show 
at Madison Square Garden last winter? 

We cannot answer this question 
and refer you to Mr. Thompson for 
an answer. A breeder who can clean 
up things the way he can is not 
afraid of other breeders beating him, 
that much is sure. We believe he 
just wanted to add a little of the un- 
expected to the show and this gives 
more enthusiasm to all. 



Black Anconas 



Will you please tell me all about the Black 
Anconas. I have a neighbor who has them and 
he says they are great layers. 

V. L. V., Michigan. 

The Standard does not recognize 
such a breed and we do not believe 
any poultry authority would do so 
either. The so-called Black Anconas 
are nothing but Anconas in which 
the white is missing and appear to 
be very much like the Black Leghorn 
and we would not be surprised if this 
was what your neighbor had. They 
may lay well but we do not believe 
they will ever meet with any great 
reception because of the fact that the 
Leghorn is so much the same. 



We often discuss the necessity for 
proper feeding of baby chicks and 
and proper care without realizing 
just why it is necessary to be so 
correct in procedure. Here is one 
reason quoted from an experiment 
station bulletin on baby chick feed- 
ing: 

"One of the most striking char- 
acteristics of chicks, as compared 
with other farm animals, is the rap- 
pidity with which they grow. A chick 
weighing one and one-half ounces 
when hatched can be made to weigh 
4 0 ounces when 12 weeks of age. 
This weight is slightly more than 2 6 
times the original weight of the 
chick. If a Holstein calf weighing 
100 pounds at birth could be made 
to grow relatively as fast as a chick, 
it would weigh approximately 2,600 
pounds when three months old." 

Sounds logical, doesn't it? And it 
accounts for the necessity of having 
a ration that supplies all the nec- 
essities for building up the body, and 
at the same time is easily digestible 
and palatable. 

It must also be noted that chicks 
are unusually active for their size 
and must be supplied with energy 
for the activity. Then again, the 
body temperature is high, and heat 
elements are necessary in the feed 
in addition to physical care in re- 
gard to chilling. 



BROODY HENS AGAIN 

There are two kinds of hens on 
every farm at this time of year, 
broody hens and laying hens, and it 
costs 18 to 20 cents a month to feed 
each. The broody hen lays no eggs 
and therefore cuts down the flock's 
production, the laying hen will aver- 
age 18 eggs a month and brings a 
return on her keep even during low 
egg prices. 

A good system to follow in break- 
ing up broody hens, says W. H. Allen, 
of the New Jersey Agricultural Col- 
lege, is to visit the henhouse each 
night and put in the broody crop all 
hens found on the nests. Confine 
these birds to the coop for 72 hours 
and feed them nothing besides lay- 
ing mash, green feed and plenty of 
water. For best results the broody 
coop should be roomy and located 
in a cool place. 

A good system to follow in regard 
to broody hens is to put a colored 
celluloid leg band on the hens every 
time they go broody. Some poultry- 
men by following this system are 
finding out to their surprise that a 
few of their birds are doing practic- 
ally all of the brooding. They are 
broody several times during the seas- 
on, while other hens of the same 
breed and strain do not go broody 
at all. When a bird appears at the 
end of the laying season with four or 
five bands on its leg, it is needless 
to say that it should never be used 
as a breeder. 



Is your town's cemetery one that 
looks as if it didn't believe in a resur- 
rection? 



RHODE ISLAND REDS 
By D. E. Hale 

Experience breeders and beginners alike will 
find the information contained in this instruc- 
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times the price. Learn from it how to select 
and mate birds for the breeding pen, how to 
feed, judse and exhibit successfully. 

Fully illustrated, including a fine color plate 
by Sewell, 88 pages. 9 by 12 inches. Price 75c, 
postpaid. Address Poultry Keeper, Quincy, 111. 



Dr. David Roberts 
Poultry Tablets 

A combination of sulphocarbolates of 
calcium.sodium and zinc for the treat- 
ment and prevention of White Diar- 
rhea and all intestinal infections of 
baby chicks, as well as poultry in all 
stages of life and productivity. Drink- 
ing water for poultry should be medi- 
cated to overcome and prevent disease. 
The annual poultry loss by disease is 
stupendous---over 50 per cent. 

Save Your Chicks 

Serve in fresh water. Aids digestion. 
Permits food to nourish them through 
their babyhood, the non-productive 
period when hardy bone and strong 
muscle is needed to give them a good 
start in their race for the laying period. 
They will reward you manyfold later 
on. Give them proper protection and 
you will find there is big money in 
poultry. Sold in tablet form. 

50 Tablets 50 Cents 

Poultry will drink when too sick to eat. 
Baby chick organs are peculiarlysensi- 
tive. They need something to ward off 
disease, particularly that most dreaded 
and destructive disease white diarrhea. 

A Tablet A Day 
Keeps Disease Away 

One package, 50 tablets, enough to 
medicate 50 gallons of water, a most 
effective and economical preventive, for 
only one cent a gallon. Use Dr. 
David Roberts Poultry Tonic, Louse 
Powder, Poultry Cholera Medicine, 
Poultry Roup Paste and Disinfectall, 
all known and tried prescriptions. 
Sold by our druggist, dealer, or direct. 

Dr. David Roberts Practical Home Veteri- 
narian, a veterinary doctor book, regular price 
#1.00, tells you how to treat your own poul- 
try, also describes our 44 prescriptions — a 
prescription for every animal ailment. We 
will tell you how to get it FREE. 

Our Special Introductory 

Offer Send 25 cents, just one half the 
regular price, for one package Dr. 
David Roberts Poultry Tablets, sent 
you postpaid, providing you give us 
the name of your druggist or dealer. 

DR. DAVID ROBERTS 
VETERINARY CO. 

135 Grand St., Waukesha, Wis. 



Drinking 
I To Their 

Health 



Page Number 8 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 




SUPER SOL-HOT 
Heater for Canopy 




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Positive Oil Control 

The Super Sol-Hot is the only heater on the mar- 
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before next season. Write now for free descriptive 
folder. We'll also send you folder telling all about my 

MULTI-DEK 

Sectional Incubator 

The Multi-dek '"add a section as you need it" idea 
just exactly fits in with the average poultry raisers' 
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Give your hens a chance to do their best. 
Keep the houses, runs and broodera 
sanitary with a BROWNS' AUTO- 
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for spraying home fruit trees and doinff 
many other jobs. Over 750,000 in use. 

Send tooTay for Catalog and 
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THE E. C. BROWN CO. 
895 Maple St., Rochester, N.Y. 




LEG BANDS 

All guaranteed-Any size 

ALUMINUM BANDS 
with raised figures, 
price postpaid, 10-15c, 
25-25c, 60-3oc, 100-60e. 
ECONOMY colored 
celluloid 





with aluminum back. 
Any color, two large black num 
bers in each band, prices 12-30c, 
25-50c, 50-SOc, 100-J1.BO. 
Makers of 25 different styles of 
of LEG & WING bands. 
The National Poultry Band Co. 
Send for catalog. Newport, Ky 



THIS MOST PROFITABLE BREED 

(Continued from Page 3) 
decided point against the breed. 

One of the big items of income 
from the large flock is from the sale 
of commercial eggs. During the past 
the demand around Xew York and 
some other points has been for a 
white egg and this has always helped 
the Leghorns and Anconas but of 
late we see that this requirement is 
passing away and we .predict in the 
course of ten years that the brown 
egg will come back into its own. It 
is said that the Leghorn will lay 
more eggs and stand confinement 
better than the larger breeds and 
that is the reason for their populari- 
ty but we believe that the demand 
in the past for white shelled eggs 
has done much to boost this breed. 
Perhaps they may hot be so popular 
when the egg market adjusts itself 
to the brown egg. 

We have just mentioned that the 
price of day old chicks of the heavy 
breeds come higher in price than the 
light weight breeds and that means 
nothing if it does not mean a greater 
revenue. It is largely the same with 
hatching eggs. The price of Leghorn 
eggs are almost always less than 
with the other breeds. Some of our 
fancy breeders may object to this 
statement but we are not talking 
about high priced eggs but taking 
the average run of prices. Good 
breeding stock of any breed will 
produce eggs of high price. With 
the average run of stock we find it 
more difficult to dispose of the small 
breeds than we.-do with the larger 
fowls. You might buy a Leghorn 
cockerel for say three dollars but if 
you wanted to buy a Rock you 
wouldn't get much for anywhere 
near that price. The small breeds 
are at a disadvantage in this matter 
and there is no getting around it. 

When we come to the market fowl 
side of the poultry business we find 
that the heavy breeds have it about 
all their own way. In the first 
place the four pound hen cannot 
hope to compete with a seven pound 
hen. A fowl weighing almost twice 
as much would bring almost twice 
as much when sent to market, other 
things being equal. But they are 
not equal. The Leghorn is at a dis- 
advantage on the market, in fact 
some markets cut the price on the 
carcass of them. The breeders of 
some fowls, especially the Leghorns 
have been so anxious to increase pro- 




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duct ion that they have lost sight of 
the market side of their fowls with 
the result that today they are not 
sought after as a market fowl. It 
is high time that they awoke to this 
fact and took some action to over- 
come the existing conditions. This 
can be accomplished by breeding a 
better market fowl. We admit that 
it costs more to raise a Rock and 
the investment is greater but the in- 
come from the carcass is so much 
greater in proportion than the ini- 
tial cost that it proves to be a money 
making proposition after all. 

If we were to sum up the matter 
we would say that under proper con- 
ditions one breed will pay just about 
as much revenue as another. Unless 
the conditions are right the income 
is sure to be affected. Take the mat- 
ter of climate for an example. It 
is possible to keep Leghorns in the 
extreme north and they do well bur 
a thinly clad fowl is a native of the 
south and should be bred there. His 
big, husky brother who has an 
abundance of feathers will keep 
warm in the rigors of the north- 
woods winter and thrive. Tne big 
idea is to select a breed which will 
do well under your immediate condi- 
tions. 

To those who have limited ground 
and who must practice intensive 
poultry keeping. We recommend the 
smaller breeds. They require less 
house room, small yards and con- 
sume less feed. When they are past 
their usefulness they may be sold 
around the neighborhood for eatinu 
and in this way may be disposed of. 
To those who have plenty of space, 
we suggest the larger breeds. We 
must remember that the farmer, is 
after all the main stay of the poul- 
try business and it is to him that 
we must sell breeding stock. He 
will demand a heavy fowl nine times 
out of ten and it is perfectly proper 
he should because he has the range 
for them to grow and develope and 
as he produces his feed on the farm 
it is an easy matter to rear them to 
full size at a reasonable figure. To 
him the smaller breeds do not seem 
to meet his individual needs and we 
should take due notice and see that 
he gets what his needs demand and 
what he wants. Let the city breed- 
er take the smaller breeds and push 
them for egg production and get all 
he can out of them but let the farm- 
er raise a breed which is sufficiently 
large so that he may send it to mar- 
ket and command a premium for a 
choice table fowl. 

There is a profit in every breed 
of poultry but we must use this 
breed under the conditions which 
permit it to return the greatest prof- 
it. If this is done we will find thai 
each man may have his own breed 
and yet make a good return in a fi- 
nancial way. Some breeders may be 
so narrow that they cannot, or shall 
we say will not, admit that any 
breed is valuable but the one which 
they keep, xhis is a selfish view of 
the matter and no fair-minded breed- 
er will ever be guilty of such a view 
point. Study your conditions and 
then select the breed which will do 
the best under those condtions and 
you will have no cause to say that 
poultry does not pay, for it will pay 
and pay you well. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 9 



SUCCESS MEANS WORK 



Editor Poultry Keeper: 

"We are subscribers to "Poultry 
Keeper" and think it a great little 
paper. We have derived much bene- 
fit from it. I keep every issue so I 
can refer to them whenever I want 
to. 

"You wanted some of your readers 
to give their views on "Does Poultry 
Pay." If we just keep some hens, 
any kind and keep crossing them 
with any thing that comes along, 
feed them some corn and pay no 
attention to our poultry houses or 
drinking founts, then I would preach 
from the house-top, 'it does not pay 
to raise poultry under such condi- 
tions and these conditions exist in 
far too many poultry yards. 

"If you don't believe it, take a 
trip through the country and see for 
yourselves. I had a lady come to my 
house the other evening, just after 
I had gathered my eggs. She ex- 
claimed: "O what lovely big eggs. 
How many hens have you?" I told 
her 58. "And how many eggs do 
you get?" I told her from 37 to 40 
per day and seven hens setting. "Oh! 
I surely want to get some of your 
eggs to set." I asked her how many 
hens she kept. "I have 85," was her 
answer, "and I only get one and 
one-half dozen eggs per day." 

"I was shocked. I asked her what 
kind she had. "Oh! I have black 
ones, white ones and barred rocks." 
In short, every old chicken, I laugh- 
ingly said. She said: "Yes. What 
kind have you?" "Buff Orpingtons 
and we wouldn't think of crossing 
them with any other chicks," I in- 
formed her. "Well perhaps there is 
something in that." She had never 
given that a thought and she is a 
woman 60 years of age, always lived 
on a farm, yet had let her poultry 
just take care of themselves. They 
feed straight corn. Corn is a great 
feed but it needs wheat and other 
grains, especially sprouted oats, to 
make up a good ration. We also 
feed a good mash. This is before 
our hens at all times. We cleared 
S21.37 during the month of March. 
We got 85 dozen eggs that month. 

"We send to Chicago, buy 12 doz- 
en cases and get 38c per dozen for 
our eggs instead of 21c, our local 
store gives us. But if we would 
have sold locally we would have no 
more than have paid our feed bill 
of ?9.00. It pays to express your 
eggs. We select them, that is, we 
pick out all small eggs, and use them 
at home. A small egg means noth- 
ing to us, but a great deal to the 
man who must buy. We have a 
drinking fount that holds five gal- 
lons of water, keeps it warm in win- 
ter, clean and cool in summer. 

"It takes study and plenty of work 
to make the poultry pay. 

"I hope my letter is not too long 
and let us squeal so hard to our 
senators and congressmen that they 
will be glad to kill the Chinese egg 
market here. 

"Yours for more success. 

Mrs. R. L. Hamilton. (Wis.) 



A box of dust in the laying house 
helps a lot to keep the hens free 
from parasites so they can lay in com- 
fort. 




worn 



CHICK to CHICKEN 
in Shortest Time 

Co !f LCl 'r I , 1 fee ? 1 " e Promotes quick ana writable 
growth The balanced feed that supplies all bodily 
needs of rapidly growing birds is 

DICKINSON'S 

GLOBE GROWING MASH 

Palatable, easily digested, contains the necessary 
variety of growing proteins and vitamines. Feed this 
mash in a hopper, always accessible. 

Globe Scratch Feed in the litter provides exercise. 

Ask your dealer— he can get Dickinson 
feeds if he does not sell them now. 



The Albert Dickinson Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A. 




'HE ALBERT DICKINSON CI | 




Quality Baby Chicks I 

c 

EACH 

UPWARDS 



{ 

t 

f 

I 



9 20,000 BREEDERS, bred exclusively for high egg 
production, and standard qualities. Every fowl selected 
jS by the Hogan Test. 

LARGE PRODUCTION enables us to sell quality 
chicks at price of common hatchery product. 

INCUBATOR CAPACITY 10,000 eggs each day, 
all eggs used arc from these flocks. 

Our 32-page illustrated catalogue is free, and gives 
valuable information on care of chicks and poultry. 

Chicks shipped by parcel post prepaid, live arrival 
guaranteed. 

MISSOURI POULTRY FARMS, 
Write Today for Great Price Reduction Columbia, Mo. -t 



WH r s CAPON $J? ? 



A book that explains why Capons are the most profitable part of the poultry business and everything 
you will ever want to know about CAPONS. 50 pictures from life that show each step in the 
operation. List of Capon Dealers' addresses. Tells how to prevent "Slips," where to get the 
best and cheapest capon tools. Capons are immense eating. Big profits realized. Get wise. This 
book tells how. Copyrighted new and revised edition. Kegular 50c copy, prepaid to your address 
(a short time only) for a Dime in coin or stamps. 

GEOEGE BEUOY, E. K. 17, CEDAE VALE, KANSAS. 



BALLARD'S SUPREME WHITE ROCKS 



Have mated some fine pens for the eg 
P. W. BALLARD, 



trade from my Champion winners. Mating list on request. 

GALESBURG, II ili. 



SUCCESSFUL BACK-YAED POULTEY 
KEEPING 

A new one just off the press. Tells every- 
thing you need to know about poultry keeping 
on a small scale to insure success. The largest, 
most complete and down-to-date book on the 
subject ever published. Will turn failure into 
success and is an invaluable guide to any be- 
ginner. 

Every person who Is keeping fowls on a 
small scale or is planning to do so — everyone 
who wants to learn about the latest practical 
methods adapted to back-yard conditions — will 
want this big, truly helpful book. Every Im- 
portant phase of the subject is covered in the 
seventeen chapters contained within its pages, 
from the laying out of the plant to the use of 
artificial illumination — the new method that 
positively doubles and more than doubles fall 
and winter production. Whether you are In- 
terested in poultry keeping simply to produce 
a supply of eggs for home use or as a money- 
making Bide line, you need this practical 
down-to-date book. 

"Successful Back-Yard Poultry Keeping" 
contains 104 pages, 8% by 12 inches, over 100 
Illustrations and a beautiful three-color art cover 
by Schilling. Price $1.00, postpaid. Address, 
Poultry Keeper, Qulncy, Illinois. 



THE OLD SELLABLE ILLINOIS HATCHEEY. 
Select Chicks from Heavy Laying Hens. 

White and Brown Leg- 
horns, 50-$7, 100-$13, 
500-$G2.50. Barred Bocks 
and S. C. Beds, 50-$S, 
100-$15, 500-$72.50. W. 
Wyandottes, W. Bocks, 
R. C. Reds, 50-.$8.50, 
100 -$16., 500 -$77.50. 
Black Langshan, Buff 
- Orpington, Parks Barred 
Rocks, 50-$9, 100-$17, 
500-$82.50. 9. C. An- 
conas, 331 Egg Strain, 
50-$9.50, 100-S18, 500-$87.50. Buff Bocks, 50- 
$9.50, 100-$18.00, 500-$87.50. White Orpingtons, 
50-S10.50, 100-$20.00. 100 per cent Live Delivery 
Guaranteed. Prepaid Parcel Post. Order Now 
PYom This Ad and Save Time. Reference, 
State Bank. Catalogue Free. 
MILLEK HATCHEEY, Box K, Heyworth, 111. 



When writing advertisers please mention 
this paper. 




Page Number 10 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Stronf Healthy Chicks 
That Grow 



Chicks that hatch out 
weak and wobbly, and live 
but a few days, mean nothing 
^ to you except trouble and loss. 
They make one sick of the poultry 
business. Most of the chicks you lose in the first 
two weeks die because they did not hatch out with 
enough vitality or strength for a good start. 

Queen Incubators 

arefamousfortheir ^ 
large hatches of , 
strong, healthy j 
chicks that live and t 
grow. They have s. 
been used for many | 
years by the lead- | 
ing poultrymen of 
America. 

The Queen is ac- 
curately regulated, 
taking care of » 
sudden tempera- e 
ture variation without danger. The Queen is 
built of genuine Redwood, which does not absorb 
the odor from hatching eggs, to weaken later 
hatches. The Queen has double walls of California 
Redwood, with insulation between. The Queen 
hot water system prevents the eggs from drying 
out and provides ample moisture for the hatch- 



It* *} is* ' S 




ing chick. 



Ask for Free Catalog 



QUEEN INCUBATOR CO., Lincoln, Neb. 



265fc313Bqqs per Year! 
^ Record — i 
MUelecfhom 




Best Laying 

Hen at the big 
ChicagoPoultry 
Show December 
1921 this Ferris 
hen won over 
all breeds in 
the egg laying 
class. O n e of 
many Ferris 
National Win- 



Lowest 
Prices on 
chicks, eggs 
' pullets , hen s and 
^ males. English or 
lAmeriqan type. 
(Quick shipment. 
\No delay. Send 
for catalog 
now, 

909-B Union 



at AMAZING 
BARGAINS 

Never before has the 
famous Ferris stock been 
offered at such bargain 
prices! Pedigreed; trapnest- 
ed; guaranteed! Egg bred 
for 22 years. World's larg- 
est leghorn farms. Write 
for special bargain prices on 
Birds-Eggs and chicks. 

1922 Catalog Free 

Send today for your 
copy of our 1922 Cat- 
alog and Mating List, with 
Special May cut prices. 
Get this catalog and in- 
crease your profits. It's 
Free for the asking. Sim- 
ply send your name and 
address. Write today. 

GEORGE B. FERRIS 
Ave., Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Salient Points In Poultry Culture 



Hints and Suggestions on 
Brooding, Feeding 
Hobbs, Member of Mis 



Breeding, Incubating, 
and Housing. By Y. 0. 
souri State Poultry Board. 




V. O. HOBBS 

In all countries and in all climes 
there is the cheep! cheep! cheep! of 
countless chicks who have discarded 
their egg-shell abodes for the clear, 
balmy atmosphere of Spring. 

Millions of downy, fluffy puff- 
balls of baby poultry are spreading 
out over the land, for the most part 
to be paternally cared for — to be 
kept dry and warm and happy and 
comfortable, because they represent 
a great and important source of the 
world's wealth. 

The cluck! cluck! cluck! of the 
portly and splendid mother hen is 
not so much in evidence these days. 
Biddy and her brood is getting to 
be a thing of the past. It is because 
a new fangled contrivance has come 
to usurp her rights and dull her 
glory. 

Biddy could hatch out and raise a 
good sized family, but the incubator 
and brooder can hatch out and raise 
a whole tribe. 

To the short-sighted it seems a sin 
and a shame to strip a hen of her 
motherly instinct; but on the other 
hand, a new method has released the 



1 



Breeders For Sale 

REGAL DORCAS WHITE WYANDOTTES 

My Summer Sale List this season is 
the most complete list I have ever of- 
fered. The birds are all specially se- 
lected and were in my matings for 1922. 
Many of them will win in the large 
shows next Winter and all have grand 
breeding with generations of Regal Dor- 
cas ancestry back of them. Bargain 
Prices. 

SPECIALS — 500 January and Febru- 
ary cockerels and pullets that will be 
ready for the September shows. Send 
for a trio or pen of these beautiful 
chicks to fill out your string. 

FREE — Send for complete Summer 
Sale List. Twenty-page Catalogue also 
free. 

JOHN S. MARTIN, Box 408, Port Dover, Ont, Canada 




hen from a great burden and proven 
a providential thing for the chick. 

The mother hen seldom raised 
more than half her brood. With her 
big clumsy feet she trampled down 
the crippled one, with her breast- 
bone she pinned to the ground and 
smothered another, and if she was 
lousy she gave them her lice. There 
was not much profit in Biddy's 
brood. 

It's different now. Chickens are 
successfully hatched and brooded in 
great numbers. Incubators and 
brooders have made poultry raising 
very much easier and a great deal 
more profitable. 

If from the above paragraphs you 
think chicken raising is becoming a 
soft snap, you have another think 
coming. There are no easy ways to 
success in any line of industry, least 
of all in poultry production. 

Raising poultry for profit is a 
hard, head-scratching problem. It 
includes breeding, incubation, brood- 
ing,- feeding and housing, and unless 
you are pretty well up on each of 
these details, your chicken gold is 
not going to pan-out to your satis- 
faction. 

We get many good ideas from both 
old-timers and pioneers in poultry in- 
dustry. They are continually being 
passed down the line. Here are some 
to be considered. 

Breeding. 

Much depends upon the hatching 
egg. Good stock is the first thing 
to be considered. Know your eggs! 
Only the eggs of hardy hens are 
worth the effort it will take to hatch 
them. Only first-class chickens are 
worth raising. 

Pure bred fowls have the consti- 
tutional vigor to pull through to ma- 
turity with small loss. , They develop 
quickly, their flesh is solid, they be- 
come heavy-weights; they are sleek 
and glossy feathered, attractive, and 
if marketed, bring good prices. With 
prime stock you can raise a large 
per cent of the chickens hatched and 
make a fair profit on every bird. 

Breeding is the first and most im- 
portant step. You should be a keen 
observer of what is going on in your 
breeding pens. Your success next 
season and perhaps for many sea- 
sons, depends upon your present mat- 
ing. 

In one season you can easily de- 
stroy all the beauty of your flock, 
all the symmetry and markings, and 
all the inherited egg-laying charac- 
teristics, or you may by giving the 
proper attention and thought to your 
matings, make considerable progress 
toward perfecting your strain and 
fixing more firmly those qualities of 
beauty, productiveness and stamina 
which the poultry fancier desires to 
establish. 

A person who is careless about his 
mating and who does not studv the 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 11 



good and bad points of the males 
and females from which he is to 
breed, can never build a permanent 
business in pure-bred poultry; the 
only kind of poultry that's profitable. 

.-ome understanding of the laws 
of evolution is required. The sur- 
vival of the fittist applies to generat- 
ing all kinds of stock, the growing of 
fruit and plant life. Also it applies 
to :he human family, but the devel- 
oping of mankind evidently doesn't 
matter. It has been given the least 
consideration. 

Select your breeding stock before 
the birds are fully matured. You 
ought to be able to cull out the weak 
from the strong at a glance. The 
look and action of a fowl is usually 
an index to its physical condition. 
A weak bird is apt to be inactive, 
droopy and sleepy-eyed. It does not 
scratch or forage sprightly. Bright 
red comb and wattles, clear eyes, 
smooth, shiney feathers, good appe- 
tite, large crop, nimble legged — 
that's the kind to be chosen for your 
breeding pens. 

Do not use pullets and immature 
male birds for breeding purposes. 
It ias been demonstrated that the 
chicks from hens' eggs are larger 
when hatched, and that they mature 
quicker and produce stronger and 
better specimens than those hatched 
from pullets. A half-grown cockerel 
should never be used in your breed- 
ing yards. 

Forcing fowls to lay by continually 
feeding heavy, rich food, and a large 
egg yield, tells upon the health of the 
females and often injures their 
bl eeding qualities. 

The breeding yard should be large 
enough to give the chickens free 
range, and they should be forced to 
scratch for their feed. Crowding and 
lack of exercise is always harmful. 

Eggs for hatching are sometimes 
kept in places that are too cool, or 
too hot. Provide clean nests, gather 
the eggs daily and keep them in a 
temperature of from 50 to 60 de- 
grees, and do not hold them more 
than two weeks before being set. 
Incubation. 

Select an incubator in size suit- 
able to your needs; one that has been 
time-tried and test-proven — that can 
be regulated with absolute certainty 
and has proper provision for both 
ventilation and moisture. 

There are many good incubators 
on the market, properly built and 
scientifically equipped, but the best 
incubator manufactured will not 
make an infertile egg fertile, neith- 
er will it make a weak-germed egg 
hatch. You may have made a poor 
mating, or you may be obliged to 
change males in some of your pens. 
Before the real hatching season 
comes on, it's a good idea to make 
a trial hatch and avoid chances. 

The same process of elimination 
you employed in the breeding pens 
must be continued in the incubator. 
It is safe to assume that the first 
half of the chickens which hatch in 
the incubator will be the most profit- 
able. The last half may not pay, if 
kept to maturity. The first half 
hatched usually grow more rapidly; 
mature quicker; lay first and lay 
most eggs. The last half hatched 
are chicks lower in vitality, and a 
menace to the flock. 



The fact that a chick grows rapidly 
in the shell and makes good use of 
the food which nature has placed 
there for its use during the first 
20 days of its growth and develop- 
ment, and then hatches and beats 
another chick out of the shell from 
6 to 2 4 hours, is almost a sure sign 
that the first will beat the last ten 
in the race of life and at every stage 
of its existance. 

Brooding. 

Select a brooder with the same 
care that you did the incubator. If 
you have been successful in operat- 
ing your incubator, you have the 
skill to manipulate your brooder. 

The tireless brooder is good under 
some conditions, but the most prac- 
tical hoover is the one which em- 
ployes a heating system that provides 
abundant warmth in the coldest 
weather. The heat should be regu- 
lated and controlled just as in the 
incubator. A proper and uniform 
temperature is especially important 
during the first two weeks of the 
chicken's life. 

The brooder should be started 
when the chicks begin to hatch. The 
temperature in the brooder should 
not be more than four or five de- 
grees lower than that of the incu- 
bator. As the chicks grow older the 
temperature should be gradually 
lowered until they are old enough to 
do without heat altogether. 

If the chicks stand with their 
mouths open, they are too hot. If 
they huddle together, you can depend 
upon it, they are too cold. A little 
too much heat is better than not 
enough. A variation of a few de- 
grees is not a matter of grave im- 
portance, but a chilled chick is a 
dead one, nine times out of ten. 

As the chicks grow and feather 
out, they both generate and conserve 
an increasingly larger amount of 
heat. Keep them comfortable, yet 
reduce the artificial heat as rapidly 
as possible. 

The proper type of brooder de- 
livers a constant and abundant sup- 
ply of warm fresh air to the chicks 
while they are hovering. There must 
be a cool apartment provided. Few 
if any chicks would survive if they 
were constantly subjected to a tem- 
perature as high as that under the 
hover. The cooler apartments tough- 
ens them, makes them stronger and 
helps to prepare them for the time 

(Continued on Page 13) 



MINERALIZED WATER 
ROUTS CHICKEN LICE 

Tablets Dropped into Drinking Founts 
Banish Vermin, Make Fowls Grow 
Faster and Increase Egg Yield. 



Any poultry raiser can easily rid his flock 
of lice and mites, make chickens grow faster 
and increase their egg yield by simply add- 
ing minerals to the fowls' drinking water. 
This does away with all bother, such as dust- 
ing, gTeasing, dipping and spraying. The 
necessary minerals can now be obtained in 
convenient tablets, known as Paratabs. Soon 
after the fowls drink the mineralized water. 




all lice and mites leave them. The tablets 
also act as a tonic conditioner. The health 
of the fowls quickly improves, they grow 
faster and the egg- yield frequently is 
doubled. Little chicks that drink freely of 
the water never will be bothered by mites or 
lico. 

The method is especially recommended for 
raisers of purebred stock, as there is no iisk 
of soiling the plumage. The tablets are 
warranted to impart no flavor or odor to the 
eggs and meat. This remarkable conditioner, 
egg tonic and lice remedy costs cniy a trifle 
and is sold under an absolute guarantee. 
The tablets are scientifically prepared, per- 
fectly safe, and dissolve readily in water. 

Any reader of this paper may try them 
without risk. The laboratories producing 
Paratabs are so confident of good results 
that to introduce them to every poultry 
raiser they offer two big $1 packages for 
only SI. Send no money, just your name and 
address — a card will do — to the Paratab 
laboratories, Dept. 814, 1100 Coca Cola 
Bldg., Kansas City, Mo., and the two $1 pack- 
ages, enough for 100 gallons of water, will be 
mailed. Pay the postman $1 and postage on 
delivery, and if you are not delighted with 
results in 10 days — if your chickens are not 
healthier, laying more eggs and entirely free 
from lice and mites — your money will be 
promptly refunded. Don't hesitate to accept 
this trial offer as you are fully protected by 
this guarantee. 



When writing advertisers please mention 
this paper. 



JULY AND AUGUST PRICES 

Quick delivery parcel post paid. 95% alive de- 
a livery. Order today from this advertisement at 
s N*u":^)l these low prices: 
Sh FFLL BLOODED QUALITY CHICKS ONLY 

, 25 50 100 500 

' Assorted, odds and ends _ S2.75 $5.00 S 0.00 ?42.50 

S. C. W. Leghorns 3.00 5.50 10.00 47.50 

(American and English-American Strain) 

S. C. W. Leghorns 3.75 7.00 13.00 C2.50 

#. Jit (Barron, Strictly Imported Strain! 

■'W/M S. C. Br. Leghorns 3.00 5.50 10.00 47.50 

/Mm Anconas 3.25 COO 11.00 52.50 

Earred Bocks 3.25 COO 11.00 52.50 

S. C. E. I. Beds - 3.25 6.00 11.00 52.50 

R. C. E. I. Beds - 3.50 6.50 12.00 57.50 

White Bocks _ - 3.50 6.50 12.00 57.50 

White Wvandottes _ 3.50 6.50 12.00 57.50 

Black Miiiorcas 3.75 7.00 18.00 62.50 

Buff Orpingtons _ - 3.75 7.00 13.00 62.50 

FARROW -HIRSH CO., Peoria, Illinois 




RAISE RHODE ISLAND REDS 

HE BEST ALL PURPOSE BREED 



Your name and address will bring free 
educational literature on Rhode Island 
Reds and information why they are, 
the greatest money-making poultry" 
breed; also catalogs and circulars from 
leading Red breeders. For foil informa- 
tion address 

RHODE ISLAND RFI* CLUB of AMERICA 
W. H.Card, SecBox 914 , Manchester. Conn. 




■ This ad paid for by C. P. Scott, Peoria, 



111. 



Page Number 12 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



MAKE BIG MONEY 
WITH POULTRY 

I will show you more secrets, use- 
ful and helpful poultry information, 
in a week than you can get in a 
year in any other way. 

I'll show you How to tell slackers 
and poor layers and cull out the non- 
producing hens. How to avoid white 
diarrhea. How to prevent death 
in the shell. How to 
secure better hatches 
under hens or from in- 
cubators. How to raise 
chicks and insure 
quick and strong 
growth. How to keep 
a flock in good health 
and to avoid and treat 
diseases. How to feed 
and care for breeding birds to insure 
good fertility and strong hatching 
eggs. How to get more eggs and save 
feed bills. How to balance your ra- 
tion so as to produce the greatest 
number of whites. 

Full information Free. Write, 
Prof. T. E. Quisenberry, Dept. 4019, 
Kansas City, Mo. Write today. 






^ig drop in fence prices — 
freight prepaid. Write 
for new 1922 cut price 
catalog, snowing big 
price cuts on 150 styles 
of famous Brown quality 
, Double Galvanized fence, re 
, roofing and paints. Also bargai 
r gates, steel posts, etc. 

THE BROWN FENCE & WIRE 

Dept. 57 A oteveland ' ° hl ° 



ad y 1 
ns in 1 

co. 8 



KEEP YOUR FOWLS 
ALIVE 

Just one drop of "OCTJLrii" a day 
KEEPS disease away. "OCULtJM" is 
Harmless but Powerful. Leaders praise 
it for it makes fowls gain a pound or 
more and lay better. This Journal 
O. K's it. 

Bottles 50c, and $1, postpaid. A 50e 
bottle holds 1440 feeds. Sample 10c. 
Booklet FREE 

The "OCUI/UM" Company, 
Box S, Salem, Va. 

GUARANTEED 
Dealers Handle Agents wanted 



Cured Her 



Rheumatism 



Knowing from terrible experience the 
suffering caused by rheumatism, Sirs. J. 
E. Hurst, who lives at 508 E. Olive St., 
B225, Bloomington, 111., is so thankful at 
having cured herself that out of pure 
gratitude she is anxious to tell all other 
sufferers just how to get rid of their tor- 
ture by a simple way at home. 

3irs. Hurst lias nothing to sell. Merely 
cut out this notice, mail it to her with 
your own name and address, and she 
will gladly send you this valuable infor- 
mation entirely free. Write her at once 
before you forget. 



TIMELY TOPICS 

Readers are asked to co-operate in making this Department 
interesting by sending in suitable items to, F. Raymond 
Benson, 915 Augusta Ave., Elgin, Illinois. 



Herbert W. Mumford, professor of 
animal husbandry at the University 
of Illinois has been appointed dean 
of agriculture. Prof. Mumford suc- 
ceeds Dean Davenport who resigned 
recently. The new dean has been 
with the university since 1891. 

* * * 

The Hilltop Farm, Morristown, 
New Jersey had a destructive fire 
and have been greatly hindered 
thereby. However Ave are glad to re- 
port that they will soon be in shape 
again. Tne fire menace has been do- 
ing a great deal of damage to poul- 
try farms all over the country. 

* * * 

The Northern Illinois Poultry As- 
sociation of Belvidere, Illinois will 
hold their thirty-fifth consecutive 
show January 9-14, 1923. This is 
indeed a very good record and should 
stimulate other associations to a 
greater effort. Joseph Dagle will 
judge the show. 

* * * 

The Twenty-Sixth annual exhibi- 
tion of the Wisconsin State Poultry 
Association will be held at Oshkosh, 
February 2-5, 1923. We expect that 
many of our readers will want to 
show some birds and will be glad to 
know the date. 

S * * 

Mr. J. M. Chase, Wallkill, New 
York is Secretary of the Rose Comb 
White Leghorn Club and breeders 
are invited to write him for applica- 
tion blanks. 

* * * 

Mr. Joseph G. Kren, Syracuse, 
New York has been breeding Single 
Comb Black Minorcas for twenty-five 
years and yet some people say that 

poultry is just a fad. 

* * * 

It is reported that out in Cali- 
fornia they have a Single Comb 
Rhode Island Red hen which has 
laid 345 eggs in her first laying year 
and 416 eggs in 454 days. This is 
a fine record and should stir up 

breeders of other breeds. 

* * * 

Mr. E. C. Branch, Chairman of the 
Standard Revision Committee, met 
with an accident recently and we un- 
derstand that several ribs were brok- 
en. We trust that he will rapidly 
recover and be able to attend the 
meeting of the American Poultry 
Association. 

* * * 

Link Orr announces that there will 
be no increase in the entry fee at 
Madison Square Garden next season. 



BRED TO WIN AND LAY 

HORNER'S PEDIGREED S. C. REDS 

Cockerels for Sale. We can furnish you with Show birds, or strong fine breeders, $5.00 and 
up. At Dlinois State Fair, 1st Pen, in a hot class of 17 pens, also 2nd Pullet in a class 
of 47. Adams County Pair, Cockerels, 1, 3, 4, 5; Pullets, 1. 2, 3, 4,; and Pens 1, 2; Champion 
Pen; Champion Pullet. Pen mated. Write for matting list. 

Qnincy, Illinois 



ERXEST G. HORNER, 



R. R. 7, 



Mr. C. H. Hubbard the veteran Or- 
pington breeder has gone into busi- 
ness for himself. 

* * * 

A. C. Robertson, proprietor of the 
Robadel Poultry Farm, Cos Cob, 
Conn., has been seriously ill but we 
understand he is on the road to re- 
covery. 

* * * 

William E. Langshaw has been en- 
gaged by the Philadelphia County 
Fair Association to manage the Poul- 
try Department the coming fall and 
we look to see a real show under his 
management. The show will be held 
September 4-9 and you can reach Mr. 
Langshaw at Greenville, Deleware. 

The State Summer Meet of Wis- 
consin is to be held July 2 3-24 at 
Oshkosh. 

* * * 

Harold Rawnsley has gone to Can- 
ada to have charge of the breeding 
operations of the Bonnie Burn string 
of J. S. Greenshields at London, 
Canada. 

There were 820 entries of eggs in 
the egg show at the Indiana Agri- 
cultural College, Purdue University, 
held May 1-4. This is the four- 
teenth show and it would be a good 
idea for others to follow the ex- 
ample. 

* * * 

We understand that there are 
3500 members of the Rhode Island 
Red Club of America. This is cer- 
tainly an excellent showing and 
other Clubs can well look to this 
Club as a guiding post. 

* * * 

We regret very much to learn of 
the death of H. H. Stoddard. He was 
85 years old. Mr. Stoddard was a 
charter member of the American 
Poultry Association and wrote ex- 
tensively for the poultry press. His 
influence was largely felt and he did 
much to put Standard poultry on a 
firm basis. 

The Iowa Ancona Club has beeti 
formed through the efforts of Emil 
J. Kremer, Dyersville, Iowa, and we 
look to see interest in this state 

show an increase. 

* * * 

Mr. A. G. Studier has assumed the 
editor's chair of Western Poultry 
Journal. We also note that Mr. H. 
A. Daniels will have charge of the 
Beginners Department. This combi- 
nation should give the readers a 
down-to-t he-minute paper. 



WHY NOT 



Make your chickens weigh a 
pound or more each and lay better. 
"OCULUM" does it for others, try 
it. Write The "OCULUM' Co., Sa- 
lem, Va., for a sample, it only costs 
10c. Booklet Free. 



SALIENT POINTS IN POULTRY 
CULTURE 



(Continued from Page 10) 

when they will have to get along 
without artificial heat. 

Feeding. 

Next to being well hatched and 
comfortable quartered is the pro- 
vision for feeding. Chicks should 
not be fed for twenty-four to forty- 
eight hours after they are hatched. 
Xature has already provided the 
chick with sufficient nourishment 
for that length of time. 

Sprinkle over the floor of the 
brooder a little clover, fine cut 
straw, or clean litter free from dust 
or mould. Good clean earth should 
be kept in one corner or over a 
portion of the brooder floor. The 
chicks enjoy working in the earth; 
it absorbs the dampness from the 
droppings and is a good disinfectant. 

It is well to provide a small foun- 
tain of sour milk or butter milk for 
the first half of the day and water 
for the . last half. The acid of the 
milk aids digestion, kills and pre- 
vents the growth of bacteria and has 
an appetizing effect. 

Begin by feeding a mixture of 
boiled eggs, cut very fine, and bread 
crumbs and continue this diet for 
two or three days, or feed two-thirds 
rolled oats and one-third wheat bran 
mixed with a small amount of pow- 
dered charcoal. Oatmeal is an ex- 
cellent food for young chicks. There 
are also some good commercial feeds 
on the market, but only a few of 
them are compounded by competent 
poultry feed experts. But if they are 
made from good pure unspoiled 
grains and properly balanced, then 
they are perfectly safe. 

The feed should be placed on a 
clean board or paper four or five 
times a day, and only in small quan- 
tities each time. Remove the feed- 
in- board after the chicks have had 
enough. 

Clean sand should be given about 
the time of the first meal. If the 
sand is not obtainable, use fine com- 
mercial grit. 

After the chicks are four or five 
days old you can add to the rolled 
oats and bran, a little commercial 
chick feed; gradually increasing this 
until the rolled oats and bran are 
eliminated from the first or grain 
feed. If the commercial chick feed 
is thrown into the litter it compels 
the little fellows to scratch for it, 
which gives them the needed exer- 
cise. 

After the first week begin a feed 
of dry mash. A good mixture is 
compounded of two parts wheat 
bran, one part shorts, one part corn 
meal and one-half part rolled oats 
or oatmeal. This may be improved 
by adding one-half pound of very 
fine salt to each hundred pounds of 
the mixture, and also by adding a 
handful of powdered charcoal and a 
handful of bone meal. If you can 
secure a high grade manufactured 
mash made from first-class ingredi- 
ents, then this will be all right. 
However, don't give your chicks just 
any old feed you can buy on the mar- 
ket as the best is none too good. 

If the chicks are on a free range 
and get plenty of bugs and worms, 
they will make better growing pro- 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 

gress. It is advisable to give chicks- 
all the sour milk or butter milk they 
want from the time they are hatched 
until fully matured, if it can be sup- 
plied. 

Housing. 

Small and poorly constructed 
houses often accounts for the lack of 
vitality or weakened condition found 
in many flocks. One of the chief 
causes of disease and death in poul- 
try is the over-crowding and unsan- 
itary condition of roosting quarters. 

Insufficient sunshine and ventila- 
tion in chicken houses causes the air 
to become laden with moisture and 
impurities. Sunshine and fresh air 
are the enemies of disease and ver- 
min. 

Care should be taken to see that 
mites and lice do not gain a foot- 
hold in your flocks. Scrutinize your 
coops and houses to see if you you 
can discover evidences of these par- 
asites. 

As a precaution, the inside and 
cracks and crevises and roosts should 
be painted with solution of three gal- 
lons of coal oil to one gallon of crude 
carbolic acid. 

Chicken houses of modern type 
have many windows for the admis- 
sion of sunlight, and various schemes 
for the circulation of fresh air. 

The shutter or non-draught ven- 
tilating system now in popular fa- 
vor, solves the problem of admitting 
fresh air without draught or sudden 
changes of temperature. It is built 
on the same principle as the shutter 
cupolas seen on barns, and may be 
adapted for use in colony, breeding 
'and laying houses. 

The idea of a draught, wind, rain 
and snow-proof ventilator for chick- 
en houses, came from Prof. T. E. 
Quisenberry and is an equipment of 
his "Fool-Proof" Poultry House. 
This house was adopted by the Mis- 
souri State Poultry Experiment Sta- 
tion, and is without doubt the best 
all purpose house ever designed. 

Poultry correctly bred, properly 
nourished and suitably housed will 
pay a handsome profit. There is 
only one way to achieve success in 
the poultry industry and that is to 
make it a study, and this knowledge 
linked up with common sense and 
good judgment will make you a win- 
ner. 



THE PLYMOUTH ROCKS 



By William C. Denny 



This complete breed book explains standard 
requirements and tells how to select, mate and 
exhibit winners In all varieties. Subjects of 
special Importance to Plymouth Rock breeders, 
such as how to get correct barring in Barred 
Rocks, "Stay-white" plumage in White Rocks, 
correct, uniform color in Buffs, double mating, 
line breeding, strain building, etc., all are 
plainly and fully treated. 

Well illustrated, Including three color plates, 
144 pages, 9 by 12 inches. Price $1.00 postpaid. 
Address Poultry Keeper, Quincy, Illinois. 




Reliable Standard 

BLUE FLAME HOVER 

1922 model. Adjusted at the factory. Produces 
well controlled beat; automatically controlled. 
Burns ordinary kerosene with a clear, even blue 
flame. No soot; no fumes; no odors; no 
wicks to trim; no smoke. Our Reliable 
Incubators, Brooder3. Hovers, Poultry 
Appliances and Fixtures are all backed 
by our positive guarantee. V 4T 
Write us for Catalog. Our Dealers Everywhere. 4 * «i« 

Reliable loenbotor and Brooder Co. 

Box 15 Quincy. III. V 



S, G. White, Brown and Buff 
LEGHOBN PULLETS 
$1.00 Each 

Yearling hens. Cock birds. We have 
over 10,000 head of High Class 
stock. Catalogue. 25 Standard va- 
rieties. 

The South Kenton Poultry Farm, 
Kenton, Ohio 

Chas. W, Wyllie, Supt. Geo. W. Cox, Prop. 




P o u 1 1 r y Leg B and s 



Colored Leader, Adjustable, fit 

anything from bantam to goose, 
numbered consecutively, 5 colors: 
Red, Blue, Green, Yellow, Pink. 
100, $1.50; 50, $1.00; 25, 60c. 

Heavy Aluminum, numbered con- 
secutively, large raised figures, mil- 
lions sold, adjustable, will stay on. 
100,60c; 50, 35c; 25,20c. 

Celluloid Spiral, 5 colors, 
Red, Blue, Green, Pink, Yellow; 
can be easily distinguished. 

12 25 SO 100 250 500 

No 1 Asiatics $.25 .45 $.75 $1 20 $2.7S $5.00 

No' 2 Rocks, Reds, etc. .20 .40 .60 1.00 2.25 4.00 
No. 3 Leghorns, etc.. . .20 .35 .50 .90 2.00 3.50 

Prices are postpaid. State color and breed. 
Eureka Supply House, Box K, Mt. Morris, III 




Poultry Necessities 

PRATTS POULTRY REGULATOR 
PRATTS LICE KILLERS 
PRATTS POULTRY DISINFECTANT 
PRATTS POULTRY REMEDIES 

'Your Money Back If You Are Not 
Satisfied" 

Dealers Everywhere 

PRATT FOOD COMPANY 



Vree-CofiAe&s Poultry Book 



30 pages chock full of information about the feeding and 
rearing of chicks, culling of hens, etc. Tells how to keep 
chickens healthy and how to make them pay. Whether 
a beginner or a professional, Conkey's Book is worth 
dollars to you. Sent for 6 cents in stamps to cay postage. 
THE C. E. CONKEY CO. E542 Broadway. Cleveland, Ohia 



Oat Sprouter $2.49 

For $2.49, including heater, you can make the 
best oat sprouter on earth. Plans for building:, 10c 
I. PUTNAM, Route 724-0, ELMIRA, N. Y. 



Why Not Get REAL TOM BARRON Leghorn Chicks and Eggs 

from a firm that has imported direct each year since 1915, at prices but 
little higher than the Commercial Hatcheries charge for common stock. 
Chicks $15.00 per 100, $13.50 per 100 after June 1st. Eggs $8.00 per 100 
with free replacement for all non fertiles. Orders filled promptly from this 
ad or send for descriptive list to 

COLEMAN RULES EGG FARM. Importers. Bov N. Mt. Carroll. III. 



Page Number 14 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



$1Q SS Bu y s 140-Egg Champion I 

I0 — Belle City Incu bator I 

Hot-Water.Copper Tank, Double Walls 
Fibre Board, Self Regulated. Piftgc 
S7.9S buys 140-Chick Hot. <> I M 
Water Brooder. Or both for only ■ ^™ 

Express Prepiid I *ov« 

East of Rockies and • "JisSJ™ 
allowedtopoints West. US«r» 
Guaranteed. Order now. Shan 
In my S 1,000 in Prizes, or write 
forFreeBook "HatchineFacts." 
It tells everything. Jim Rohan, Pres. 

QaH« City Incubator Co., Boy 14.5 Racine, Wis. 





WA NTED 

To hear from owner having poultry farm or 
other propertv for sale. Give inscription and 
c, S-weeks 
cockerels $1.00. Mrs. E. E. Nail, Lewistown, 
Mo. 

10,000 CHICKS EACH WEEK— May prices, 
Grade A $18, Grade B $15. June and later all 
grades Clucks at $10 per 100, Eggs $6. Pedi- 
greed, Trap-nested, Imported Barron stock with 
no hen under 248-egg record in six years 
breeding. Also D. W. Young S. C. White Leg- 
horns, direct, separate. Our customers say we 
have Best stock in America. Catalog. 8,000 
early pullets, $1.50 each. Brownstown Poultry 
Farm, Brownstown, Indiana. 5-3 

BROWN LEGHORNS 

S. C. DARK BROWN LEGHORNS— Eggs only. 
6c each delivered. Willis Fairbanks, Mora, 
Minn. 

W. W. KULP, BOX 30, POTTSTOWN, PA.— 

The leaders In size and contest winners. Cata- 
log. Both combs. 

BUFF LEGHORNS 

SINGLE COMB BUFF LEGHORN YEARLING 

hens $2.00 each. Eggs and breeding pens. Ar- 
thur Worthington, R. 3, Two Rivers, Wis. 7-2 

BLUE ORPINGTONS 

LOOK — Royal Blue Orpingtons. Winners. John 
Unangst, 1214 Prairie Ave., Freeport, HI. 3-12 

BUFF ORPINGTONS 

SINGLE COMB BUFF ORPINGTON COCKER- 

els. February hatched. Also several good 
yearling pens. Walter Goessllng, 930 Jeffer- 
son, St., Quincy. 111. 

RHODE ISLAND REDS 

REDS THAT LAY! The strain that pays. 
Rose Comb. Eggs. Circular. Albert Bern- 
hardt, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. 

ROSE COMB RED EGGS— From prize winners 
and record layers. (Bean strain.) Mating list. 
Daugherty's Poultry Farm. Metcalf. 111. 3-2 

POLISH 

BUFF-LACED POLISH EGGS $3.00 SETTING. 

Golden $2.00. Eleanor Jeffers, 1st Ave. West. 
Oskaloosa, Iowa. 



BREEDER'S CARDS 



PHEASANTS 



$9.00 PER POUND for pheasants. Easy raised. 
Great demand. Complete book breeding 36 var- 
ieties: Pheasants, Peafowl. Illustrated natural 
colors $1.00. Colored catalog: 400 varieties 20c. 
Bargains. Lowest prices. All kinds Wild Game, 
Turkeys, Quail, Peafowl, Pigeons, Pet Stock, 
Poultry, Waterfowl. Eggs for hatching. Ex- 
changes made. (1000 Pheasants. Eggs — want- 
ed.) U. Pheasantry, 1026 West 24th, Los 
Angeles, Calif. 6-3 



PIGEONS 



OFFER— mated Homers, $2.00 pair. Beautl- 
White Homers, $3.00 pair. Get my prices 
on Runts, Carneaux, Maltese Hens. Free book- 
let, Squab Mannual 50c. Charles B. Gilbert, 
2210 Almond St., Philadelphia, Pa. 10-6 



WHITE ROCKS 



SNYDER'S WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS — Stock 
for sale. Eggs, $2.00 per setting. A. E. Sny- 
der, Dellwood Poultry Yards, Dellwood, N. Y. 



BARRED ROCKS 



"CACKLERS" . ARE PUREBRED BRED-TO- 

Lay Barred Rocks. Trapnested by Geo. W. 
Pratt, Cropsey, III. Bargain prices on either 
young or old stock. Unrelated pens. Write 
wants plainly. Circular free. 

PARKS ROCKS — Eggs that will hatch. Cata- 
log. W. W. Kulp, Box 30, Pottstown, Pa. 

MY VICTORY STRAIN OF BARRED ROCKS— 

Won at Toledo, O., Nov. 29th to Dec. 4th, 1921. 
3, 4, 5, Ex Cock; 2 Ex Cockerel; 1, 2, Ex Hen; 
3 Ex Pullet; 1, 2, Pullet Bred Cock; 2 Cock- 
erel Bred Pen; Silver Medal for Best Display. 
Barred Rock Club shape and color specials. 
Send for photo of my winning birds. J. T. 
French, 838 West Grove Place, Toledo, Ohio. 

SEVERAL VARIETIES 

GOLDEN PHEASANT EGGS $3.50 SETTING. 

Black Siberian Rabbits $4.25 pair. Guinea pigs 
$1.75 pair. Squirrels $5.00 pair. Roller Canar- 
ies $5.50. Parrots $8.00. F. Sudow, Los An- 
geles, California. 

ALL KINDS OF PUREBRED PRIZE WINNING 

poultry and pets. Write your wants. Peter 
Bros., Randolph, Minn. 

SHEPPARD S. C. ANCONA AND PENNSYL- 

vania S. C. W. Leghorn eggs for hatching, 
$2.50 per 15. H. E. Ritter, Middleburg, Pa. 



450 VARIETIES: Wild Game, Peafowl, Pig- 
eons, Pheasants, Rabbits, Wild Turkeys, Ban- 
tams, Poultry, Quail, Deer, Geese. Colored cata- 
log, 20c. U. Pheasantry. Los Angeles, Cal. 



TURKEYS 



WILD TURKEYS. $28.50 pair. $4.75 setting. 
Bronze, Holland, Burbon $4.00 setting. Ferd. 
Sudow, 1026 West 24th, Los Angeles, Calif. 0-3 



EGGS FROM HIGH CLASS OLD STOCK— Mam- 
oth White Holland, Mamoth Bronze and Bour- 
bon Red. Ten $S.00; Twenty $15.00; Thirty 
$19.00. Mrs. Frank Spurling, Forest Park, 111. 

5-4 

BRONZE GOBBLERS $10— Eggs 10 for $6.00, 
prepaid. Order now. Aaron J. Felthouse, 
Goshen, Ind. 2-6 

POULTRY SHOW 

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN SHOW— Buyer's 
Guide (list of exhibitors) free. Official Marked 
Catalog 75 cents. Both books very valuable. 
Send for them. Address D. Lincoln Orr, Sec'y, 
Box 23, Orr's Mills — Cornwall, N. Y. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

RADIO FOR EVERYBODY. Learn at home, 
the Construction of Radiophone and Telegraph 
Receivers for Beginners", of 18 chapters, fully 
illustrated. 80 cents post paid. Free catalogs 
of all the latest and best Radio. Automobile, 
Tractor and Electrical books. V. M. Coiich, 
Ithaca, N. Y. 

PRINTING 

PRINTING SPECIALS— During June, July, 
August. 100 sheets linen finish note paper and 
100 envelopes both printed with your three line 
advertisement $1.25, 200 note paper and 100 en- 
velopes $1.50 postpaid. Summer sale list brist- 
ling with bargains, for stamp only. Model 
Printing Company, Manchester, Iowa. 




Let The Hens 

More [ ] 

Remove The Lice and Theij Will 



IT IS the healthy hen that lays a good egg and lays it regularly. Hens full 
of vitality and vigor can keep up a heavy egg production. Hens free from 
lice and mites — they put money in your pocket. A hen worried to death with lice cannot 
lay if she wants to. Feeding high priced feed to lousy chickens is a dead loss. Don't do it. 
Use the new way to kill lice and use LICECIL. No dusting, no dipping, no painting. Hang 
up the original open bottle. It acts like magic. It will help to put a few drops in nests 
and on roosts. Then uncork the bottle, hang it up in coop or hen house and the powerful 
evaporating vapors which leave the bottle will do the rest. 





X///SL/ce 



Protect your fowls from the powerful and insidious 
lice and mites that suck the life blood of your birds. 
These parasites allowed to run rampant in a hen 
house will suck more blood, more vitality every night 
than fowls can replace by the assimilation of large 

quantities Of food during the day. This is a money- 
making and a money-saving proposition. Think it over. Extra care must 
be taken that not only the birds are kept clean, but every crack and crevice 
should be purified as welJ. Use LICECIL as indicated and in a few days 
your entire flock and hen house will be rid of every louse and mite. 

How to use LICECIL 

Simply put a few drops in the nest and on the roosts, hang the uncovered 
bottle in coop or hen house. The powerful evaporating vapors which leave 
the bottle descending in mist form penetrate feathers, cracks, crevices 
everywhere. Lice, mites, chiggers, roaches, bed bugs, ants, etc., have no 
lungs. They breathe through the pores of the body and are destroyed 
by LICECiL vapors. Will not injure chicks. Testimonials from 
every Stateinthe Union tell of wonderful results from its use. 

Give it a Fair Trial 

If you prefer to fight poultry pests in the old way— it is cer- 
tainly your privilege to do so. But your own best interest, 
t and the success others are having, will lead you to give 
LICECILafair, honest trial at the earliestopportunity. 

1 Bottle, $1.00 — 3 Bottles $2.50 
12 Bottles $9.00 — All Postpaid 

AMERICAN SUPPLY CO. 
DEPT. P. K. 

Quincy, Illinois 



Evidence 2 

American Supply Co., 
Quincy, 111., 
Dear Sirs: 

Enclosed please find $2.50 for 3 
bottles of the Licecil. With great 
success I have used it and am more 
than pleased with it. 

I have no more trouble with lice. 
It is the first thing I have got that 
I could and would gladly recommend 
it to any person. 

MBS. F. L. KABNS, 

Riverside Dr. 



Madrid, Nebr.. Mar. 15, 1922. 
American Supply Co., 
Quincy, 111. 
Dear Sirs: 

Find enclosed check for four dol- 
lars ($4.00) for which send me one 
gallon of Licecil. 

I used 3 bottles of Licecil last 
summer, and think it is the best louse 
and mite killer I ever usid. 
Yours truly. 

EMIL BENSON, 
R. F. D. No. 2. Madrid. Nebr. 




Chicken Mites Filled 
With the Life Blood THE PNn 
of Faithful Hens E END 




M9 



ma 
'ml 
'mml 

With Lice g*» 
Away RWC^ 
Hens Will 

Miff 5 



Lay. 



25 Cents Reduction 



We are pleased to announce a reduction of 
25 cents on our "Big 4" clubbing- offer. This 
is the most popular club offer we have pub- 
lished and with this reduction will appeal to 
still more of our readers. The club this year 
will be 

Poultry Keeper, 1 yr. v ALL FOR 
Farm and Home, 1 yr. ( ^ 
Farm and Fireside 1 yr. C $1 .00 
Successful Farming, 1 yr. ) 

This will undoubtedly be the best sub- 
scription offer of the season. You will like it. 
Address, 

POULTRY KEEPER, 
Quincy, 111. 



Page Number 2 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 




DON'T MISS THIS 

FOUR BIG MAGAZINES SlM 

HERE IS THE LIST: 

Poultry Keeper, Farm and Fireside, 




of Eur ul Life 



Farm and Home, 

Successful Farming 

These magazines will bring you each month a 
wonderful supply of information in relation to 
Poultry, Horticulture, Dairying, Gardening and 
kindred subjects. 

They are filled with instructive, sensible read- 
ing matter that will help you in your every day 
work. If you take this club once you will always 
want it because it will appeal to you as giving 
so much in value for so little money. 

Don't forget that you will receive all four mag- 
azines one full year and the price is only $1.00 
Write now, before you forget, send your order to 
A. OTIS ARNOLD, Publisher, Quincy, Illinois 




Classified Advertising Pays 

Don't just take our word that Poultry Keeper leads all others and is recognized as the best paying medium for poultry advertising 



$4.00 

Pays 
for a 

20 
Word 

Classified 
Ad 

4 

Months 



J 



What Advertisers In 1921 Say: 

Classified advertisers have invariably reported excellent results 
from the use of this kind of advertising in POULTRY KEEPER. 
This is due to the low rate which we mate in conjunction with 
our large circulation. Also many advertisers are getting a still 
lower rate by running their ad four or more times. 

POULTRY KEEPER has not profited during the War by shoot- 
ing its prices out of the reach of the average breeder. It has 
kept it at dead rock with the result that any breeder that has 
some good stock is justified in using our classified columns in 
disposing of same. 

These testimonials have just come to hand which we offer 
as proof of what we have said. Here they are: 

"Enclosed find check. Please continue my classified ad. 
We cannot afford to miss an issue." 

The Fenn Bantam Yards, Delavan, Wis. 

"Am pleased to state that I am having excellent results 
from my advertising in POULTRY KEEPER. It is the 
best investment I ever made in advertising." 

Arthur Worthington, Two Rivers, Wis. 

"Please insert my classified ad two months. Had good 
results from the last ad." 

Mrs. Chas. Schlots, Elmwood, I1L 

"Please discontinue my classified ad in POULTRY 
KEEPER as we are flooded with orders, having received 
88 in the last three days and we now have all the orders 
we can fill. 

Rauchs Poultry Yards, Jenera, Ohio. 

We want to solicit a classified ad for every breeder of poultry 
who has surplus stock or if you. have eggs and baby chicks for 
sale. You will be surprised at the returns you receive and will 
find the investment quite profitable. 



RATES: 



Sates for Ads. Classified 
Under Proper Head- 
ings Are as Follows: 

1 month 6c per word 

2 months 11c per word 

3 months 16c per word 

4 months 20c per word 

1 year 50c per word 



$10.00 

Pays 
for a 

20 



Classified 
Ad 

1 Full 
Year 



The next four months is the time to reap your harvest from poultry advertising. 
SEND ORDERS AT ONCE TO POULTRY KEEPER — AD. DEPT. — QUINCY, ILL 



THE 




A JOURNAL FOR 
EVERYONE 
INTERESTED 



KEEPER* 



IN MAKING 
POULTRY 
P A V 



Vol. XXXIX 



AUGUST, 1922 



No. 5 



How To Handle Pullets 



By F. RAYMOND BENSON 



The season of the year is at hand 
when it seems necessary to round 
out the pullets into proper form and 
as many of our readers have never 
had much experience along that line 
of endeavor we will attempt to ex- 
plain a few of the necessary require- 
ments. 

Perhaps the first requirement is 
I hat the chicks be well hatched and 
from healthy, vigorous stock. It is 
almost next to impossible to mature 
a pullet in good shape unless she has 
an abundance of vigor and is well 
hatched. If the parent stock shows 
any weakness it is sure to crop out 
in the young stock and when you be- 
gin to round out the pullets you will 
suddenly awake to the fact that you 
made a mistake when you kept that 
cock bird as head of your breeding 
pen which had the roup a year ago. 
Perhaps it was a bunch of hens 
which were overfat and the fertility 
was low and those which did hatch 
did not show much pep. Whatever 
may have been the cause the result 
is evident at this time. Then again 
perhaps you were careless in airing 
ihe eggs or turning them while they 
were in the incubator or the tem- 
perature went too high on several 
occasions. Rest assured that if the 
strongest egg was not properly 
hatched — well the pullets will show 
it now. Even after the little chicks 
were hatched they had to be carried 
through the danger period and that 
is far from a small task. The feed 
must be balanced just right and the 
exercise of the little fellows must 
not have been overlooked. They must 
have been brought up to the present 
age with as nearly a perfect physi- 
cal development as possible. One 
great trouble is that after the little 
chicks get well started the caretaker 
sets careless and as a result they get 
mighty poor care. They may go 
without water for half a day at a 
time and even get lousy. Then all 
at once the discovery is made that 
something is wrong and of course 
the mistake is corrected but the 



damage done cannot be overcome 
entirely. When the little fellow 
once gets stunted — well you may do 
all that you can think of and yet 
the matter cannot be rectified. It 
can be helped but like a disease it 
is apt to leave minute traces here 
and there through the system. 

One of the most prevelent mis- 
takes is the crowding of the chicks 
either when small or after they be- 
gin to grow. Growing chicks need 
plenty of room and you simply can- 



not crowd them without ill effects. 
Close confinement in small yards or 
on board floors causes many a poul- 
tryman to become discouraged with 
the results. Mistreatment of various 
kinds tend to weaken the vigor of 
your pullets and in after weeks it 
shows up to their disadvantage. 

Another serious mistake is to 
allow the chicks to be exposed tc the 
intense heat of the summer sun with 
no shade. Shade must be provided 
(Continued on page 8) 



1 




First Prize Cock Bird 

Chicago National Show.Jan.1922 
son of hen no. 3295, record 301 eggs 

Bred and Owned by 

Geo.B. Ferris, Grand Papids, Mich. 



Page Number 4 

POULTRY KEEPER 

Qulncy, Illinois 
401 Hampshire Street 
A Journal for Everyone Interested In Making 
Poultry Pay. 
Issued the First of Each Mouth 

Subscription Price: 
BOc a year; Single Copies, 5c 
Foreign Postage: Twenty-five Cents a Year 
Additional. 

Entered at the Qulncy, HI., Post Office as 
Second Class Matter. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Money 
Order, Express Order or Registered Letters. 
Small sums will be accepted In United States 
one or two cent postage stamps. 

Change of address— When this Is desired, be 
sure to give old and new Post Office addresses. 

All subscrlbtions invariably discontinued at 
expiration. Subscribers will confer a favor by 
reporting to us irregularities In receiving the 
Poultry Keeper. 

Advertising rates made known on application. 

Poultry Keeper readers are cordially Invited 
to express their opinion on any subject of 
poultry that will be of Interest to our readers, 
give helpful talks to the Inexperienced and ask 
questions In any department. 

A. OTIS ARNOLD, Editor. 

F. RAYMOND BENSON, Ass't Editor. 



POULTRY* I THE PUBLISHER OF THIS 

^FTOCgfl ga . MAGAZINE IS A 

«||i§8/ LIFE MEMBER OF THE 

>S^^ American Poultry Association 



THE POULTRYWOMAN 



Often the writer receives letters 
from women who are in the poultry 
business and they seem to find en- 
joyment in their work. Without ex- 
ception these women look upon the 
labor connected with the business as 
a means to an end, as a privilege 
if you wish to state it that way. With 
the right attitude of mind it is not 
at all surprising that they make suc- 
cessful poultry keepers. 

We are indeed very sorry to say 
that some women do not look at the 
matter in the proper spirit. Take 
the case of neighbor Brown who 
finds it necessary to leave home be- 
fore daylight, most of the year and 
return late at night in his search for 
the wherewithal to buy food and 
clothing for his family. Mrs. Brown 
might have risen to the task of car- 
ing for the family flock but instead 
she let the hens die one by one of 
utter neglect. This may seem an ex- 
treme case but it illustrates the re- 
sult when a woman thinks that car- 
ing for poultry is degrading. 

The writer does not believe that 
there is a single reader of POULTRY 
KEEPER who would have done as 
did Mrs. Brown. Under the condi- 
tions we feel sure they would have 
been glad to care for the chickens. 
When a man or woman feels that 
poultry keeping is degrading it is 
high time to put them on your "not 
at home list." Poultry keeping is 
honorable and worthy of one's best 
efforts and many of our noblest men 
and women have considered it a 
pleasure and a privilege to care for 
a flock of poultry. 

PURCHASE NEW BLOOD 
NOW 



During the summer months when 
breeders are making low prices on 
choice stock it presents a fine time 
for one to secure new blood at a 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 

real saving in money. We know 
many breeders who wait until these 
summer sales are in swing and then 
purchase what new stock they will 
need. 

Personally we like to introduce 
new blood through the female line 
and purchase at least two new hens 
when possible. The greatest fault to 
find with this plan is that one must 
take a chance on their coming 
through the molt in good color, but 
there is more chance of a two year 
old hen holding her color than a 
younger bird. 

As a general rule a saving of from 
twenty to fifty per cent can be made 
by a purchase now and this mens 
quite a bit when good fowls are 
purchased. Really it pays to buy 
just as good stock as one can afford. 

Buy new blood now and let them 
rest until late fall and they will go 
through the winter and be ready for 
the breeding pens next spring. 



DO WE APPRECIATE IT 



When we were a youngster we 
used to hear about "not missing the 
water till the well ran dry." You 
know how it is for all young folks 
get such things poked at them. But 
just the same the one which we have 
just quoted is mighty true. We sel- 
dom appreciate a thing until it is 
taken from us. 

Health seems a minor matter in 
our lives until we stand face to face 
with sickness. This brings to mind 
the question as to whether we ap- 
preciate the value of poultry keep- 
ing as a health giver. Thousands of 
people have found health by going 
into the poultry business. We do 
not recommend this business for one 
who has contracted tuberculosis as 
we believe the fowls might become 
afflicted but there are many other 
diseases which can be helped by go- 
ing into the poultry game. 

There is a hazy impression that 
poultry keeping is a health giving 
occupation but we doubt if many ap- 
preciate its real meaning unless they 
have faced the matter squarely. 

Health is far more valuable than 
wealth or position and let us realize 
that this much sought after health 
may be prolonged or retained and 
many times regained by work out of 
doors in God's sunshine, such as 
poultrymen enjoy. 



ANCONAS ARE GAINING 



As a general rule one can figure 
that a breed which has a boom will 
slump after a few years and some 
other breed will take its turn on the 
upgrade. This has not been true of 
a number of breeds but it does not 
seem to be the rule with Anconas, 
This breed seems to be growing in 
popularity when many a wise man 
had said they were headed for the 
rocks. We cannot predict what the 
future holds for Anconas but we do 
feel sure that they will make a good 
accunt of themselves. 

The United Ancona Club has had 
much to do with the popularity of 
this breed. Each year they have 
published a year book and in other 
ways tried to acquaint the public 
with the merits of the breed. That 



they have been successful is evident 
and perhaps at this time the genial 
secretary Mr. Roy W. Van Hoesen, 
Franklinville, New York, should be 
given much of the credit. Mr. Van 
Hoesen has a hobby in Anconas and 
the Club and is always ready to lend 
a hand to boost both. 



CLIMATE AND EGG PRO- 
DUCTION 



One of our readers wrote us a 
short time ago and asked if it were 
true that the climate had much to 
with the production of eggs. We 
thought this subject was settled a 
number of years ago but it seems 
that new breeders are springing up 
constantly and they may not have 
known of the discussion. 

For the sake of an illustration let 
us take the poultry on the Pacific 
coast. We have it on good authority 
that the average hen there will lay 
forty more eggs in a year than they 
will on the Atlantic coast. That be- 
ing- the case the profit is quite a bit 
greater. It is true that much of the 
grain fed on the Pacific coast must 
be shipped in but were it not true 
that the hens lay more, this could 
not be done and the eggs sent to the 
Atlantic coast and a profit made. 
The hens do lay more in a warm 
climate. Cold, damp and bleak 
weather will cause a slump in egg 
production. This is one reason why 
the writer has said several times dur- 
ing the past few months that the 
future of poultry in the Southland 
was so promising. We predict that 
when the poultry keepers of the 
southern part of our country realize 
what an opportunity there is before 
them that there will be few eggs 
come east from the western coast. 
We believe a large share of the win- 
ter eggs will come from the South. 
In the northern climate it is neces- 
sary to build warm houses to keep 
out the bad weather and the cost is 
too great when our transportation 
facilities will permit rapid transit 
to our Northern markets from poul- 
try farms in the South where such 
houses are not necessary. 



A FLOCK FOR EVERY HOME 



Those who reside in the rural dis- 
tricts or even in the small towns 
take the family flock as a matter of 
course and do not give it much 
thought. Where plenty of ground is 
available a flock may be kept at 
slight cost. The ham and eggs for 
breakfast and the Sunday fry comes 
as a matter to be expected. 

To the inhabitant of the city where 
ground is counted by feet and per- 
haps inches, the matter is an entirely 
different proposition. Fresh eggs 
are a luxury to him and yet he can 
have a small flock if he will study 
his facilities and govern himself ac- 
cordingly. 

We believe that every home 
should have a flock of poultry, even 
if it be but a small one. Many times 
the cost of a hen house seems pro- 
hibitive but for the small flock a 
dry goods box or a piano box serves 
very well. For the person who rents, 
a portable house and yard is desir- 
able. It need not be large but it 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 5 




4 trofitable hatch at the 
Continental Hatcheries, 
Polo, Illinois 



From Coast to Coast 
Best Chicks and Most! 



is an advantage to be easily moved. 

There is a great advantage in hav- 
ing your own flock. They will con- 
sume the table scraps and produce 
fresh eggs of known quality. Eggs 
are excellent food and tend to keep 
the family health at par. The labor 
of caring for the flock is indeed a 
small matter and it takes one out of 
doors and this also means better 
health. 

With the prospect of a hard winter 
coming on, the present is an excel- 
lent time to start a flock with the 
positive assurance that it will not 
only pay you but you will have the 
opportunity to relax in caring for 
them and this means much to the 
person who has found it necessary 
to labor during the day. 

Start right by buying stock now 
while it may be had at reasonable 
prices. 



IMPORTANT REQUEST FOR 
CHANGE IN MARKET QUO- 
TATION TERM 



Abount two years ago the term 
"Leghorns" came into use in Poultry 
quotations in pricing undersized hens 
and broilers. The term is a mis- 
nomer and an injustice to the breed- 
ers of Leghorns of which they are 
more in the United States than of 
any other breed. 

Some of the leading produce men 
have agreed that the term "Unders" 
would be more appropriate as a term 
to describe this grade of fowls. 
Since the term "Leghorns" is already 
in use it will be largely up to you 
and your fellow market editors to 
right this wrong by properly editing 
your market quotations and insert- 
ing the term "Unders" instead of 
Leghorns. 

For your information I might 
state that there are a number of 
breeds of poultry as light or lighter 
in weight than Leghorns and that 
there are many strains of Leghorns 
which weigh as much as the so called 
heavy breeds. 

As an act of justice to the rank 
and file of your farm and suburban 
subscribers all of whom raise poul- 
try, and on behalf of the members of 
the American Poultry Association 
who breed Leghorns, I appeal to you 
to see to it that the term "Unders" 
is used in your quotations from now 
on. 

Very truly yours, 
American Poultry Association, 
Thos. F. Rigg, Pres. 



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KEEPING 

A new one just off the press. Tells every- 
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on a small scale to insure success. The largest, 
most complete and down-to-date book on the 
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Every person who is keeping fowls on a 
small scale or is planning to do so — everyone 
who wants to learn about the latest practical 
methods adapted to back-yard conditions — will 
want this big, truly helpful book. Every im- 
portant phase of the subject is covered in the 
seventeen chapters contained within its pages, 
from the laying out of the plant to the use of 
artificial illumination — the new method that 
positively doubles and more than doubles fall 
and winter production. Whether you are in- 
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a supply of eggs for home use or as a money- 
making side line, you need this practical 
down-to-date book. 

"Successful Back-Yard Poultry Keeping" 
contains 104 pages, 8% by 12 inches, over 100 
illustrations and a beautiful three-color art cover 
by Schilling. Price $1.00. postpaid. Address, 
Poultry Keeper, Qulncy, Illinois. 



Read these letters from two of 
the 800 successful hatcheries using 
Buckeye Mammoth Incubators — 
one from California, the other 
from New Jersey: 

"Berkeley, Calif. 
We have had our No. 8 Mammoth 
Incubator in operation since Feb- 
ruary of this year. We are well 
pleased with the results for this 
season. Business has been extra 
good with us. Hatches run from 
60% to 78% of all eggs. The above 
difference in percentage is due to 
the different kinds of eggs that we 
were compelled to use. Results have 
been most satisfactory. As to the 
quality of the chicks, one custom- 
er bought 200 and in six weeks had 
not lost a chick. Another bought 
350 and in six weeks had lost only 
three. So you can see that we are 
well satisfied with our No. 8. 

CALIFORNIA HATCHERY 

J. G. Tunnicliffe" 

"Vineland, N. J. 
I took the first hatch out yesterday 
and am more than pleased with the 
success— 76% for this time of the 
year is not only a good sign for the 
quality of the breeding stock, but 
also for the quality of the incuba- 
tor. I am pretty sure that I will be 
in the market for another No. 7 
for next year, as I am going to sell 
my . 

PAUL F. SMITH" 



The Buckeye Mammoth is proving 
itself, every week in the year, the real 
business incubator for the commer- 
cial hatchery business. 

The Buckeye user knows in advance 
within one to five per cent just what 
his hatch will be. And he knows that 
Buckeye chicks have the strength and 
vitality that means less than half of 
one per cent loss in shipping. The 
Buckeye Mammoth occupies only about 
one-fourth the room and saves half 
your time and labor. 

We will be glad to send our Buckeye 
MammothCatalog, which tells all about 
this remarkable invention. Let us show 
you how to start small and grow big in 
the commercial hatchery business. 

The Buckeye Incubator Co. 

1015 Euclid Ave., Springfield, Ohio 

World's Largest Manufacturers of 
Incubators and Brooders 




Buckeye Mammoths built in three sizes: 

No. 7 Capacity . . 10,368 eggs 

No. 8 Capacity . . 4,608 eggs 

No. 6 Capacity . . 2,440 eggs 



I -VI 1 uTf^%Ti^ mammoth 
J^l^vIVV^yV' incubators 



Page Number 6 



T H E P 0,U LTRY KEEPER 



1 000- Egg Queens 



.(52) 

The experience of a great many users of 
large Queen Incubators shows that it is more 
profitable and satisfactory to build up large hatch- 
ing capacity by the use of 1000-egg Queens than 
by installing one large unit. It makes it much 
less expensive to start in business, and you can 
add to capacity gradually as desired. Cost of in- 
stallation and operation is less by the Queen 
method . The Queens may be stacked in three tiers, 
the two upper rows being equipped with stub legs. 

Larger Hatches 

Hatching with 1000-egg Queen9 also results in 
larger hatches, as proven by records. Queens are 
wonderful hatchers — we have sold as many as 
275 of these large Queens to one poultryman. 
Queen Air Release Tube is a feature not found in other 
machines. It makes it impossible for air pockets to form 
in the tank, insures uniform heating and provides ideal 
hot water vapor heat. There are mam- other advantages 
which we shall be glad to explain to anyone interested. 
Write us about your needs. Queen Incubators are made 
in size from 70-egg to 1000-egg capacity. Catalog sent free. 

QUEEN INCUBATOR COMPANY, Lincoln, Nebraska 




8 to 12 
WEEK OLD 



PULLETS 

from heavy laying Hogan tested stock. Rocks, 
Reds, Wvandottes and Leghorns at new low 
prices. WECKEL BROS., Bos 391K, Moline, 111. 



Free-ConAetfs Poultry Book 



50 cages chock full of information about the feeding and 
rearing of chicks, colling of hens. etc. Tells how to keep 
chickens healthy and how to make them pay. Whether 
a beginner or a professional. Conkey's Book is worth 
dollars to yon. Sent for 6 cents in stamps to pay postage. 
THE C. E. CON KEY CO. 6542 BrMdwlJ. Cleveland, Obio 



Just Starting. 

I am a subscriber to POULTRY KEEPER 
and wish to ask you a few questions. 

1. Which breed do you recommend for Min- 
nesota for layers and market purposes? 

2. What age chicken is best to sell to 
hotels? 

3. Would you pen or allow free range? 

4. How many chickens can I raise on two 
and a quarter acres? 

A. H. E., Minnesota. 

1. From your letter I take it that 
you want a general purpose fowl and 
suggest the White Wyandotte as first 
choice. The Rhode Island Red and 
Rock are also good. We suggest the 
Wyandotte because of the rose 
comb and white feathers which 
means much on a big plant. 

2. Look up the particular market 
to which you expect to ship your 
fowls. 

3. Would prefer limited range to 
start and then pen. Perhaps it would 
be best to crate fatten them. 

4. Consider quality before quan- 
tity. A few well raised would be 
better than many poorly raised. We 
could not venture a guess as to how 
many you could raise without more 
details as to your equipment. 



A Xature Faker. 

I like the POULTRY KEEPER just fine as 
one gets such good information by reading it. 

1. I have a hen which goes on the nest in 
the usual manner but never lays. Can you 
tell me the cause of this? 

2. Should I keep a male related to the 
flock or buy a new one? 

3. How many hens should be mated with a 
Rhode Island Red male? 

Mrs. J. E. C, Arkansas. 



AMAZING QUALITY! 




Son of 
301-Egg Hen 



The result of $25,000 a 
Year We are Investing 
in Trapnesting, Pedi- 
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Special Work. 

HALF PRICE 

Because of Lower Produc- 
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and immense volume of Business. 



First Prize 
Chicago 




Your Foundation Stock 

must be right if you make money 
under present conditions. Common 
stock will not do — you need the 22 
years of egg-breeding that is back of 

Ferris Leghorns. We raise more pedigreed 
high-egg record stock than any other breed- 
er in the world, and our winnings at 10 Na- 
tional Egg Contests prove that the Ferris 
system of trapnesting and pedigreed breed- 
ing produces amazing results. 

And you need no longer be satisfied 
with exhibition birds that are poor 

layers. Ferris exhibition White Leghorns, 
winners at New York, Chicago and over 50 
other shows, are trapnested and they have 
records up to more than 300 eggs a year. 

Hundreds of the best early hatched 
cockerels and pullets that have ever 
been produced are now ready at the lowest 
prices in years. 

Exhibition cockerels as low as 
$12.50 each; exhibition hens and pullets as 
low as $6.25 each We will meet the prices 
of any other breeder in the U. S.— and guar 
antee our stock to win. 

GEORGE B FERRIS 909 C Un,on Avenue, N. W. 
" t r tf »"* ,3 ?GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



Kta_ 280-EBS 
ijjff Pedigree 

Special Fall Sale- 
Many bargains like the following: 

June pullets, dozen, $24.00, 100 for $165.00. 
Laying pullets, dozen, $36.00, 100 for $265.00. 
Laying hens, dozen, $34.00, 100 for $240.00. 
March cockerels, each $4,25, 10 for $33.00. 
June cockerels, each $2.25, 10 for $16.50. 
Eggs for hatching— Write for summer prices. 
Day old chicks— Write for summer prices. 

Above prices for immediate ship- 
ment prepaid anywhere in the United 
States or Canada. Satisfaction or 
your money back. We ship C. O. D. if you 
send 10% to guarantee express. 

Get Your Copy of This 
FREE CATALOG 

Our 32 page catalog tells all the 
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how you can double your 
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Leghorns, 




1. This hen is either egg bound 
or a nature faker. It probably would 
be about as well to have her for a 
Sunday dinner. A disease of the egg 
organs would mean long drawn out 
treatment with no assurance of a 
cure. 

2. We would prefer to buy new 
blood rather than to inbreed. By all 
means keep the flock pure. 

3. Much depends on the vigor of 
the male. About eight or ten fe- 
males would be right. 



Chicks Die. 

I changed my chicks the other day from one 
house to another and now they pass blood in 
the droppings. Can vou tell me the cause? 

H. E. S., Ohio. 

-Without knowing anything of the 
ration I would say that the chicks 
had been receiving an excessive 
amount of meat scrap. It is quite 
possible the diet has been too stimu- 
lating. More data would better en- 
able us to suggest a remedy. 



Starting in Poultry Business. 

I am a subscriber to POULTRY KEEPER and 
would like advice. 

1. I want to start in the poultry business 
in a small way and would like to know whether 
it is best to purchase eggs or stock. 

2. What breed do you prefer? 

Mrs. H. M., New York. 

1. Starting with eggs, is cheaper 
but takes longer and more uncertain. 
Starting with pullets is more expen- 
sive. 

2. Depends on the purpose for 
which you will keep poultry. The 
general purpose breeds such as Reds. 
Rocks and Wyandottes make a very 
good showing. 



Wants a Cock. 

I am raising some Barred Plymouth Rock 
pullets and want to mate them up to a male 
next spring and wonder what kind of a male 

to use. 

R. M. D., Michigan. 

We prefere two year old hens as 
breeders but have used pullets in a 
pinch. We would mate a cock bird 
with the pullets, using a large, vigor- 
ous bird. 



Wants to Round Out Pullets. 

1. What ration would you advise te feed 
to pullets in the early fall? 

2. How long can I keep a rooster and not 

inbreed? 

3. Should one buy a new rooster each year? 

Mrs. C. H. L., Missouri. 

1. Read our article "How to 
Handle Pullets" in this issue. 

2. Using a male on his progeny 
is inbreeded. 

3. We would prefer to purchase 
new blood each year or at most every 
two years. 



A Xew One on Us. 

Please send me one of your catalogs and d<> 
vou sell anv American Flag Bantams? 

H. S., Oklahoma. 

We have never heard of this breed 
of Bantams and know of none. If 
any of our readers can give us any 
information along this line we would 
be pleased to hear. The Standard 
of Perfection does not list such a 
breed. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 7 



Wants Farm in Illinois. 

A reader of this Department from 
Maine would like to get back to her 
home state, Illinois. She wants a 
small poultry farm and any reader 
who has a place which he believes 
will fill this need may take the mat- 
ter up with the editor of this De- 
partment and he will put you in 
touch. 



Having Bad L/uck. 

1. My Buff Orpingtons had chicken pox this 
spring and I would like to know if they will 
lie alright for breeders next spring. 

2. Some of my chicks died in the shell this 
year. What was the cause of that? 

3. I got some Black Minorca chicks and 
they die two and tliree each day. They appear 
alright but die in a few minutes. 

4. I found two big hens dead this spring. 
They looked alright but just dropped over dead. 
What was the cause? 

Mrs. C. A., New Hampshire. 

1. Personally we do not believe 
in using a fowl in the breeding pens 
which has been sick enough to af- 
fect its vigor. We put health ahead 
of everything else. 

2. Weak parent stock, close in- 
breeding, too high a temperature in 
the incubator, in fact a dozen more 
causes might do this. 

3. Not sufficient information is 
given to enable us to give you ad- 
vice on this matter. 

4. Looks like a case of over fat 
fowls and a ruptured blood vessel in 
the brain. 



Incubator Room. 

I have an incubator house 12x12 but it is 
too cold in winter and too hot in summer. 
What could I do to remedy this matter? 

F. F., Texas. 

As you will not incubate much in 
the winter you could remedy that 
end of the problem by installing a 
small stove. As for the summer you 
might put in ventilator or even an 
electric fan if you have electricity. 
If the house was lined it would help. 
We prefer to run the incubator in 
the basement of the residence if 
other suitable place cannot be found. 
Be careful to see that sufficient 
fresh air is provided. 



Crooked Bi'east Bones. 

I hare trouble each year in having a number 
of crooked breast bones among my chicks. Can 
you tell me the cause and remedy? 

E. K. X, Illinois. 

Roosting too early and the use of 
too narrow a roost also lack of bone 
forming material. For a roost we 
believe that it is best to use one at 
least four inches wide. 



Intensive Poultry Keeping. 

Why don't you give us an article on In- 
tensive PouLtry Keeping instead of such gen- 
eral purpose articles. We want results. 

H. S., Indiana. 

We expect to have just such an 
article ready for the September is- 
sue of POULTRY KEEPER. It is 
quite impossible to furnish one kind 
of article all the time for we must 
meet the requirements of thousands 
of poultrymen and poultrywomen 
who take our paper but you may rest 
assured that we will always strive 
to. give you results and not theories. 



Thank You. 

Some time ago I wrote you and asked for 
Hie name of some firm in Chicago to whom 
1 could ship my eggs and you gave me the 
address of a hotel with whom we have been 
dealing for several months now and I want 
to say that you gave us a big helping in this 
matter and we have found the hotel prompt in 
i.nyment of bills and satisfactory in every way. 
Tt is such sen-ice that makes us like POUL- 
TRY KEEPER and we will back you every 
' ime. 

E. A. L., Wisconsin. 



) 



4 




OLD RELIABLE I MAMMOTH INCUBATOR 



Again Far in the Lead — Away Ahead 

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The Reliable Sales book contains complete information of our full line of incubators; likewise a 
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RELIABLE INCUBATOR & BROODER CO., Box 15, QUINCY, ILL. 



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Thank you for the kind words. 
Glad to know that you have found 
a good market for your eggs. 



White Wyandotte Bantams 

Do you know of anyone who has developed 
the White Wyandotte Bantams? 

G-. H., Maine. 

' We do not happen to know of any- 
one who has developed these Ban- 
tams but it could be done alright. 
One would have to persistently breed 
from dwarf specimens and hatch late 
in the season. 



THE LEGHORNS 

This Is the most complete book ever written 
about Leghorns. This breed has been brought 
to a wonderful state of perfection as regard 
shape, color and laying qualities, and this book 
tells how this result has been accomplished. 
Contributors Include some of the best known 
Leghorn breeders in this country. Special chap- 
ters on egg farming. 

Numerous Illustrations, three color plates, 144 
pages, 9 by 12 Inches. Price $1.00 postpaid. 
Address Poultry Keeper. Quincy. niinois. 



THE ORPINGTON 



By J. H. Drevenstedt 



This book meets the need of authentic infor- 
mation regarding the breeding of these birds. 
It gives full instructions on selecting breeders, 
mating for best results, general care, feeding 
and management. There are special articles on 
each of the different varieties. Indespensable to 
all Orpington breeders who want to pruduce the 
best. 

Well Illustrated, 80 pages, 9 by 12 Inches. 
Price 75c, postpaid. Address Poultry Keeper. 
Qnlncy, Illinois. 



Barred Rock 

Baby Chicks, 

And AH Other Standard Varieties. 

1 make a specialty of Barred Rock chicks and 
1 can guarantee my customers that they will 
be more than satisfied if they order chlx from 
me, as I keep nothing but the choicest of 
Ijirds in my flocks, and they are culled each 
year for high egg production. Every customer 
ordering from me must be satisfied or money 
will be cheerfully refunded. Barred Rock 
chicks $16.50 per hundred. 

I RED YUNKER, Dakota. Illinois 



$4 ft 95 Buys 140-Egg Champion! 

1 0"~ Belle City Incu bator I 

Hot-Water.Copper Tank, Double Walls 
Fibre Board, Self Regulated. »"2° 1 
allowed to points West. u 30r» 
Guaranteed. Order now. Share 
In my $1 .000 in Prizes, or write 
forFree Book "HatchingFacts." 
It tells everything. Jim Rohan, Pres. 

Belle City Incubator Co., Boy 145 Racine, Wis. 





MAKE UP A CLUB 



Make up a club of your own, choosing the 
papers or magazines you want to take. Write 
and let me quote a special cut price. I can 
save you considerable money on your subscrip- 
tions. A. Otis Arnold, Qulncy, Illinois. 




Poultry Leg Bands 

THE "BEST YET" ALUMINUM. 
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CELLULOID SPIRAL BANDS. 
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50 


100 


250 


500 


Baby Chicks. Pigeons 


. .S.io" 


S.20 


S.35 


t .60 


81.25 


$2.25 






30. 


.40 


.75 


1.75 


3.00 


Leghorns. Anconas . 


. .20 


.35 


.50 


.90 


2.00 


3.50 


Rocks. Reds. etc. . . . 


.20 


.40 


.60 


1.00 


2.25 


4.00 


Asiatics . 


.25 


.45 


.75 


1.20 


2.75 


5.00 


Turkeys. Geese. . . 


. .30 


.50 


.85 


1.40 


3.25 


6.00 


Aluminum Marker 


Work.. 


Dept. 13 Beaver Falls, Pa. 



Page Number 8 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 




worn 



CHICK to CHICKEN 
in Shortest Time 

Corrcc- feeding promotes quick ana ^uritable 
growth. The balanced feed that supplies all bodily 
needs of rapidly growing birds is 

DICKINSON'S 

GLOBE GROWING MASH 

Palatable, easily digested, contains the necessary 
variety of growing proteins and vitamines. Feed this 
mash in a hopper, always accessible. 

Globe Scratch Feed in the litter provides exercise. 

Ask your dealer — he can get Dickinson 
feeds if he does not sell them now. 



The Albert Dickinson Co., Chicago. III., U.S.A. 




^L8£RT DICKINSON Cft \ 

-CHICAGO. 





MILLER'S 

THE OLD RELIABLE ILLINOIS HATCHERY. 
Select Chicks from Heavy Laying Hens. 

White and Brown Leg- 
horns, 50-$7, 100-$13, 
500-$62.50. Barred Rocks 
and S. C. Reds, 50-S8, 
100-$15, 500-S72.50. W. 
Wyandottes, W. Rocks, 
R. C. Reds, 50-38.50, 
100 - $16., 500 - 577.50. 
Black Langsban, Buff 
Orpington, Parks Barred 
Rocks, 50-?9, 100-$17, 
500-382.50. S. C. An- 
conas, 331 Egg Strain, 
50-39.50, 100-318, 500-387.50. Buff Rocks, 50- 
39.50, 100-318.00, 500-387.50. White Orpingtons, 
50-310.50, 100-320.00. 100 per cent Live Delivery 
Guaranteed. Prepaid Parcel Post. Order Now 
Prom This Ad and Save Time. Reference, 
State Bank. Catalogue Free. 
MILLER HATCHERY, Box K, Heyworth, Hi. 



LEG BANDS 

All guaranteed-Any size n 

ALUMINUM BANDS 
with raised figures, r j 
price postpaid, 10-15c, 
25-25C, B0-35c. 100-60e. 
ECONOMY colored 

celluloid with aluminum back, 
: Any color, two large black num- 
bers In each band, prices 12-S0c, 
25-50c, 50-80C, 100-J1.60. 
Makers of 25 different styles of 

of LEG & WING bands. 
The National Poultry Band Co. 
Send for catalog. Newport, Ky. 




:0"!P 





J BARGAIN BOOK FREE 

Over 600, uuu customers know 
prices beat them all. This latest I 
sale means! 
BIGGERI 

. s> Savingsthan| 
ever. buynowm 
"direct from factory 0 

Freight Prepaid. 150 styles of Is 
Fencing. Gates and Steel Posts. m 

I Roofing and Paints too. AH prices ■ 

slashed. Write me quick for 96-page free book. 

BROWN FENCE & WIRE CO., Dept. 57-B , Cleveland, Ohio 



HOW TO HANDLE PTTLLETS 

(Continued from page 3) 



DR. HESS 

INSTANT LOUSE KILLER 

KLLiS LICE ON POULTRY 

1 lb. 25c, 2% lbs. 50c, Except in far West 
and Canada. 

DR. HESS & CLARK, ASHLAND, OHIO 



in some form or other and if they 
do not have access to the shade trees 
you can plant sunflowers or even 
corn will help. Artificial shade made 
from boards or cloth is a great help. 
Shade should be provided in some 
shape or form. 

Improper rations were once the 
bugbear of the poultryman but now 
days a balanced ration may be pur- 
chased in the form of a commercial 
feed and we strongly recommend 
this procedure. You can mix your 
own feeds but as a general rule a big 
feed concern with efficient machin- 
ery can do this better if not cheaper 
than you can. There is an added 
satisfaction in the fact that it re- 
moves from your shoulders the prob- 
lem of mixing your feeds and it is 
well worth buying the feed for this 
if for no other reason. 

Wholesome drinking water will 
often cause sickness. Do not allow 
dirty dishes to be used for this pur- 
pose. Take them to the house often 
and scald them out and clean them 
up. Give the young stock clean, 
pure water as it comes from the weil. 

Lack of cleanliness is a real men- 
ace at this time of the year as it is 
so conductive to lice and all kinds 
of disease. It takes a little time to 
keep the house clean but if the 
young stock are worth raising they 
are worth raising well, so see to it 
that the houses are cleaned and 
sprayed with some good disinfectant 
at frequent intervals. 

We have dwelt upon the care of 
the young stock to some extent for 
a house is no stronger than its 
foundation and if the pullets have 
not been properly reared you will 
experience difficulty in rounding 
them out as you hope to do. 

One great drawback is to allow the 
cockerels and pullets to run together. 
As soon as the sexes can be deter- 



mined it is well to separate them. 
The cockerels will do better and 
e»tryone knows that the pullets will 
de^ elope into better specimens when 
cooped alone. Provision should be 
made for this in ad^ ance. 

One item that not one in a dozen 
poultrymen seem to think serious is 
the ventilation of the colony coop or 
whatever place you may have the 
pullets during the hot weather. 
Fresh air is just as important as the 
pullets become older and the fact of 
the matter is we sometimes think ir 
is of more importance for they keep 
growing and~ need more air and un- 
less we give this matter some study, 
the first thing we know we will be 
laying the foundation for all kinds 
of fall colds and catarrhal troubles. 
Often breeders will write us about 
fail colds when the whole matter is 
due to carelessness about fresh air 
for them while out in the colony 
coops. " Many times roup gets a good 
start from no other cause and for 
this reason we emphasize very 
strongly the need of ventilation dur- 
ing the summer and early fall. 
Plenty of fresh air can easily be pro- 
vided and yet drafts are to be 
avoided. 

At this time the pullets need as 
varied a ration as possible. We have 
seen poultrymen who would feed 
cracked corn almost exclusively and 
because the pullets did not eat much 
of it they figured they were saving 
money. This is a blunder, pure and 
simple. They need a mixture of 
grains. The more variety you can 
give in the way of grains, the better. 
A mash should be kept before them 
at all times. Should they get lazy 
and eat of the mash almost exclu- 
sively just keep the hopper closed 
until noon. They must be made to 
rustle around and yet the more 
mash you can get them to eat the 
better. This mash should contain 
from twenty to twenty-five per cent 
of meat scrap. We usually figure 
from one-quarter to one-half ounce 
of meat scrap per fowl daily. Of 
course when they are out on range 
and get bugs and grasshoppers, they 
can get along with a smaller amount. 
Sometimes the pullets begin to show 
signs of early laying. Often this is 
not desired for an early laying pullet 
will sometimes go into fall molt and 
this will retard their winter period 
of production and materially reduce 
their total production. So as a rule 
early laying is to be discouraged. 
We seldom like to see pullets begin 
laying before October. If they start 
in September they are apt to molt. 
If they show signs of laying you can 
move them to another house and this 
may check them. You can also re- 
tard maturity by feeding more oats. 
It is usually best to soak tnem in 
water or to boil them. Give more 
barley and wheat and reduce the 
amount of corn. Also reduce the 
amount of meat scrap in the mash. 
While we recommend the reduction 
of some of these feeds yet we do 
not wish to be understood as sug- 
gesting the limitation of the t^tal 
amount of feed given. Give the pul- 
lets plenty of feed but have it less 
stimulating. Never limit them on 
the amount of their ration. Let them 
eat heartily. If they appear back- 
ward and you wish to hurry them 
along it is best to move them to 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 



their winter quarters early. Usually 
October 1st should see them m their 
winter home but if they are a little 
show in maturing, just move them 
early and then increase the amount 
of beef scrap and corn given. 

We firmly believe , in one person 
caring for the pullets. The idea of 
having every Tom, Dick and Harry 
running into the coop is not accord- 
ing to our ideals. One man should 
care for a flock and he should al- 
ways give some sign before entering 
the coop so that they may know that 
he is coming and not be alarmed by 
his entrance. A whistle or Hullo 
or anything which they can hear and 
in time come to associate with his 
entrance will save many a hen from 
hysterics. We also believe that the 
keeper should move about his duties 
without more ado than necessary. 
Don't yell and kick at the birds but 
rather make them tame and get on 
friendly terms with them. It will 
mean more eggs in the long run and 
besides you will have the satisfaction 
of showing your friends that you 
have the friendship of your birds. 
Right here we want to discourage 
the general rule of visitors. Strange 
faces do no good and quite often the 
hens become quite upset by the visit 
of two or three strange forms. Often 
disease of various sorts is carried on 
shoes and if you get an outbreak of 
chicken pox, roup or some other di- 
sease after visitors — well just re- 
member that disease can be carried 
on the shoes. 



PRACTICAL METHODS FOR 
GROWING YOUNG 
STOCK 



Beginning with the month of Aug- 
ust one may forget the many hard- 
ships which have perhaps been felt 
during the previous months. With in- 
cubation and Brooding long forgot- 
ten our attention can once more 
turn toward the special care of the 
layers and the needed attention of 
the pullets on the range. Although 
the past season has been very much 
in favor of the growing stock, due 
largely to the plentiful rain fall 
which has caused a good growth of 
grain on the range, we are apt to 
be confronted with a much different 
condition during the month of Aug- 
ust and September. However, with 
this excellent growth at the begin- 
ning, one should feel thankful, as 
the pullets are now well under way 
and should complete the season with 
a wonderful growth. 

In planning the range work and 
housing the flock one should keep 
in mind a few of the most important 
dangers such as the best size flock 
for the best growths. Without doubt 
this is a factor of very great impor- 
tance. It is a good practice to keep 
the flock as small as possible. By 
so doing one is sure to not only have 
less trouble with sanitary conditions, 
but is sure of having a more uniform 
flock at the end of the growing seas- 
on. Where pullets are housed in 
very large flocks one cannot help 
but experience a greater number of 
culls as well as a great number of 
pullets not fully matured; due large- 
ly to the crowded housing as well 
as crowded ranges. 

Another great problem is the rear- 



Through Molting Quickly — 

LAYING AGAIN! 



Big Egg Records and Big Profits are made by 
the hens that take few vacations. Globe Egg 
Mash contains everything needed for growing 
new feathers. Keep it before them all the time 
and they will molt evenly and as quick as nature 
will let them. Some hens, when fed Globe Egg 
Mash, lay right through their molt. 

DICKINSON'S 

GLOBE EGG MASH 

should be supplemented with Globe Scratch, fed in a deep 
litter, to induce exercise and furnish fats and carbohydrates. 

All live dealers sell Dickinson's Globe Poultry 
Feeds or will procure them on request. 

THE ALBERT DICKINSON CO. 
licago, 111., U. S. A. 





Al ^T DICKINSON CO 

•^r~l£lo p, ill. 

<>E p!"1 T EED ANALYSIS 

'■wir- 




ing of good breeding cockerels for 
the coming season. Due to excess 
pep these young fellows are contin- 
ually looking for a scrap, and be- 
cause of this a large number of these 
strong vigorous birds are cowed 
down and later killed by the many 
on-lookers always waiting for an op- 
portunity to get in on such a scrap. 
Because of such actions it is well to 
house in the smallest flocks possible, 
say twenty-five to forty, if same can 
be conveniently arranged. By so do- 
ing it is often possible to raise a 
much larger percent of these valu- 
able fellows with much less loss. It 
is often a profitable practice to have 
one or two old cock birds in each 
pen of young cockerels. They will 
keep them walking pretty straight 
and eliminate a great deal of fight- 
ing. 

One need not have an expensive 
house in order to house the cock- 
erels. This alone will help make it 
possible to run smaller flocks. It is 
really only necessary to have a good 
roof and back with wire sides and 
front and the building is complete. 
This will afford plenty of shelter 
from storms and night prowlers and 
at the same time give the birds ideal 
roosting quarters. ■ 

Plenty of fresh water is of very 
great importance to the growing 
stock, therefore some means of shade 
should be provided in order that the 
watering place will be convenient 
and refreshing, as hot water not pro- 
tected from the sun rays will not 
only be harmful to the birds but will 
cause them to consume much smaller 
quantities. Feeding of plenty of 
hard grain such as equal parts wheat 
and cracked corn will give the flock 
the much desired growth. 



Uncle Ab says. "It's a sight better 
to say less than you know than to 
know less than you say." 



Rinse milk tumblers in cold water 
before scalding. 



"Smoke Em," Canned Smoke 

Reg. V. 8. Pat. Off. 
THE GUARANTEE ROUP CURE, a discovery 
of the H. M. SPAHR BREEDING ESTATE, 
WELL POSITIVELY CURE ROUP, COLDS, 
CANKER, DIPHTHERIA, and chicken-pox. 
SOLD under a MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE. 
You .should never be without this POSITIVE 
ROUP CURE. One hundred thousand unsolicited 
testimonials on file at onr office. DURING 
THE MOULTING SEASON you should FEED, 
GUARANTEE DOUBLE HEALTH AND EGG 
PRODUCER, an honest tonic without a filler, 
will keep your chickens in perfect health and 
bring them through the moult. Rid your chick- 
ens from lice and mites with GIANT SMOKE 
EM, LOUSE KILLER, and SPAHR'S LICE & 
MITE OINTMENT. 

Write or wire us today for prices and particu- 
lars. Dealers — we have a good proposition to 
offer you. H. M. SPAHR BREEDING ESTATE. 
Dept. 12, Thurmont, Maryland. 



Poultry Necessities 

PRATTS POULTRY REGULATOR 
PRATTS LICE KILLERS 
PRATTS POULTRY DISINFECTANT 
PRATTS POULTRY REMEDIES 

'Your Money Back If Yon Are Not 
Satisfied" 

Dealers Everywhere 

PRATT FOOD COMPANY 



SUPERIOR LEG BANDS 




Aluminum 
Sure Clinch 



Spiral - 
Celluloid 



12 - $ .15 12 - S .15 
25 - .25 25 - .30 
50 - .35 50 - .50 
100 - .65 100 - .95 
250 - 1.50 250 - 2.00 
500 - 2.50 500 - 3.25 
Also, colored number bands. Baby 
chick bauds. State breed and sex. Postpaid. Cat. Tree. 
AURORA BAND CO. 79 LaSalle St., AURORA, ILL 



Oat Sprouter $2.49 

For $2.49, including heater, you can make the 
best oat sprouter on earth. Plans for building, 10c 
I. PUTNAM. Route 824-0, ELM IRA, N. Y. 



WtfT?*** S c i. KNOWN FROM 

\J V> ROUTE 1 ,BOXS| 



Page Number 10 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



SUPER SOi^HOT 
Heater for Canopy 
Brooders and 
Incubators i 

► The Only 
Heater with 
Positive Oil Control 

The Super Sol-Hot is the only heater on the mar- 
ket with a positive oil control — it maintains a con- 
stant oil level — it's automatic — burns even flame all 
t he time. Acquaint yourself with the Super Sol-Hot 
before next season. Write now for free descriptive 
folder. We'll also send you foldertelling all about my 

MULTI-DEK 

Sectional Incubator 

The Multi-dek "add a section as you need it" idea 
just exactly fits in with the average poultry raisers' 
requirements, 250 to 3000 egg capacity, furnished 
complete, ready to set up, or you can build it your- 
self from set of plans we furnish free. A big winner. 
Write for free folder. " 




Get Prices on Old Trusty 
Incubators and Brooders. 

Nearly a million in use. Quick 
shipment. Low prices. Free 
catalog to any address on re- 
quest. M.M.JOHNSON CO. 
Clay Center, Nebraska 




Shipment § Freight 



Cured Her 

Rheumatism 

Knowing from terrible experience the 
suffering caused by rheumatism, Mrs. J. 
E. Hurst, who lives at 508 E. Olive St., 
B225, Bloomington, HI., is so thankful at 
having cured herself that out of pure 
gratitude she is anxious to tell all other 
sufferers just how to get rid of their tor- 
ture by a simple way at home. 

Sirs. Hurst has nothing to sell. Merely 
out out this notice, mail it to her with 
your own name and address, and she 
will gladly send you this valuable infor- 
mation entirely free. Write her at once 
before you forget. 



TIMELY TOPICS 

Readers are asked to co-operate in making this Department 
interesting by sending in suitable items to, F. Raymond 
Benson, 915 Augusta Ave., Elgin, Illinois. 



HIS PASSING FANCY 



There was a man who fancied that. 

By driving good and fast, 
He'd get his car across the tracks 

Before the train came past; 
He'd miss the engine by an inch, 

And make the train hand sore. 
There was a man who fancied that — 

There isn't any more. 

— Carnegie Tech. Puppet. 
# ■ * * 

John L. Brown of Anderson, In- 
diana has purchased the entire flock 
of Single Comb Black Minorcas of 
the Prospect Farms, Newark, New 
Jersey. The purchase includes many, 
winners at Madison Square Garden. 

Captain Guy Hollinger the new 
postmaster at Hanover, Pennsylvania 
is a chicken man and finds much 
pleasure in breeding Partridge Wy- 
andottes. Poultry is a fine means of 
relaxation for the busy business 



The baby chick business has been 
the best ever and it begins to look 
as if it were going into a year round 
business. 

Russel F. Palmer is back in the 
publishing game again with "Poultry 

Farmer." Success to you. 

* * * 

The Allentown Fair is to be held 
September 18-23 and many of our 
readers will want to be there with 
their birds. 

The National Meet of the Rhode 
Island Red Club of America will be 

held at Denver the coming season. 

* * * 

Mr. George Diehl, St. Louis, Mis- 
souri has made a good addition to 
his Single Comb Rhode Island Reds 

by buying out the Unike Farms. 

* * * 

We hear there is some talk of 
raising the membership dues of the 
Rhode Island Red Club of America. 
This is a very serious proposition 
and should be carefully considered. 




^^^^^^ 



Bojy NABOB'S 

Cfcito/ Just Rite Chicks 



GET OUR LOW AUGUST PRICES 
August Chicks For February Layers 

Postage PAID. 95% live arrival guaranteed. MONTH'S FEED FREE with 
each order. A hatch every week all year. 40 breeds Chicks, 4 breeds Duck- 
lings. Select and Exhibition Grades. Catalogue Free. 



DEPT. 16, 



NABOB HATCHERIES, 



GAMBLER, OHIO 



H. R. Showalter has accepted the 
position of western manager of the 
Keipper Cooping Co., Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin and we understand he is 
located at Kansas City, Missouri, 
where a branch office is being put 
up. This company is expanding these 
days. 

An Exchange tells the story of a 
pigeon which tried to incubate a 
couple of hens eggs. At the end of 
two weeks the owner discovered the 
situation and took the eggs away 
from the pigeon and placed them un- 
der a hen with the result that one 
egg hatched. No doubt the pigeon 
would have had a shock had she 
hatched the chicks. 

* * * 

Charles A Ream is now manager 
of the Pennsylvania Poultry Farm, 
Lancaster. Penna. 

* * * 

J. H. Robinson a well known Red 
breeder of Eastern Pennsylvania has 
sold his flock and quit the business. 

* ft * 

Charles T. Corman, a former poul- 
try writer and editor who is now 
Extension Specialist in Poultry for 
the University of Nebraska at Lin- 
coln- -has created a great deal of 
poultry interest in the state. We un- 
derstand they had an "Egg Show" in 
June. 

Albert Angell, Jr., who made Full- 
o-Pep famous has accepted a position 
with Rosenbaum Bros., of Chicago 
and will try his hand at their busi- 
ness. Mr. Angell is a wide awake 
poultry authority and we expect him 
to make a success in his new loca- 
tion. 

Mr. M. R. Knox, Downers Grove, 
Illinois passed away suddenly. Mr. 
Knox was a lover of Blue Andalus- 

ians and will be missed greatly. 

* * * 

D. Lincoln Orr who is Secretary 
of the Madison Square Garden Show 
will have full management of the 
New Orleans, La., show. 

D. H. Richards, son of the late 
E. E. Richards has been retained as 
traveling representative of the Poul- 
try Breeders Publishing Company 

and will make the leading shows. 

* * * 

Mr. F. B. Williams has secured 
eleven acres near Plain ville, Conn., 
and is building an up-to-date poultry 
farm. 

* * * 

A boy five years of age plunged 
through a skylight in Chicago the 
other day and landed in a box of 
chicken feed unhurt. This is a new 
use for poultry feed but we presume 
it will not meet with universal ap- 
proval. 

For Sale — Two thoroughbred blue 
Antedeluvian roosters. W. J. T. — . 
Classified Ad in Tribune — Republi- 
can, Meadville. Pa. These must be 
some roosters. What do you say? 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 11 



,E^s All Year 
k Round Pay~ 

\ WeShowYouHow 

^|| To Get Them 



The Nebraska Experiment Station 
has been greatly enlarged to meet 
the insistent needs. 

* * * 

White Leghorn breeders must 
arouse themselves to the action tak- 
en against their breed as a market 
fowl in Chicago. 



GOOD ADVICE 



Editor Poultry Keeper: 

"I am enclosing P. O. money order 
for |1.00 for the Poultry Keeper for 
three years. 

"I was much pleased by what you 
said in a recent issue in regard to 
buying good stock instead of spend- 
ing years building up a good strain. 

"We purchased some dark Brah- 
mas from a breeder whose ad ap- 
peared in P. K., paying five dollars 
each for them. They are excellent 
fowls in every respect — healthy, 
docile and while the Brahmas are 
not supposed to be one of the egg 
breeds, ours lay well both winter 
and summer. We consider them a 
good investment and well worth the 
purchase price. 

"My renewal to the P. K., shows 
my appreciation of the paper which 
I wish every success yours. 

Mrs. Mary A. Wilson, Minn. 



SOME BOARDERS NEVER PAY 

The breed or strain of poultry 
which contains not a single poor lay- 
er has not yet been developed and it 
will most likely forever remain a 
hope rather than an accomplished 
fact. Therefore it follows that there 
is perhaps no flock which cannot be 
improved in some measure at least 
by diligent culling. It is remarkable 
how accurately production can be 
estimated after very slight exper- 
ience by thoro application of culling 
methods. I recall a group meeting 
in which an expert gave instruction 
in culling in which several of the 
farm women culled over three- 
fourths the proved non-layers from, 
a flock of some fifty hens used as 
a practice flock. If this can be done 
after a short discussion one after- 
noon, it is reasonable to suppose that 
only a little more experience will be 
necessary to enable even more thoro 
culling. Furthermore, you who are 
interested in culling your flocks will 
have the added advantage of being 
on the ground all the time. 

Just the way a hen acts and the 
way she carries herself are important 
factors in estimating her value to the 
flock. Poor layers as a rule are 
lazy, inactive, showing their dislike 
of work by spending as much time 
as they can on their perches. "Early 
to bed, early to rise" applies pretty 
well to hens, except that they ought 
not to be too early about that "early 
to bed" part. When a hen is laying 
at a good rate she naturally has to be 
pretty busy picking up the where- 
withal to make those eggs, and she 
cannot do it in anything less than 
a sun to sun day. And then those 
bashful hens, the ones that seem 
ashamed to be seen picking up their 
feed before people, the chances are 
don't earn the feed they eat. I have 
owned one super-hen, that would lay 
for weeks at a time five and six eggs 
a week, and this hen was a revela- 
tion. 

She was first of all a good healthy, 



lively rustler, on the job at every 
feeding time, up to her ears in the 
litter scratching the rest of the 
time and always tight under the feed 
bucket when it was brot in the yard. 
She sang, hen fashion to be sure, but 
it sounded good, and it showed she 
was happy. A flock like her would 
pay dividends, and only thru selec- 
tion and culling is it possible to weed 
out the others. 

The poor layer will have a small 
abdomen, covered with dry thick 
meaty skin, a small, dry, puckered, 
yellow vent. The vent of the good 
layer is open, large and moist. Her 
abdomen will be full, and the skin 
will be soft, pliable, thin and smooth. 

The pubic bone test is a well- 
known one. The good layer is indi- 
cated by thin, flexible pubic bones, 
at least two fingers apart. If the 
hen is of a yellow shanked and yel- 
low necked breed, the color will be 
reduced in the heavy layer. If a hen 
has a yellow beak and shanks, any 
time in June, July or August she 
has undoubtedly been a poor layer, 
and had as well be disposed of. A 
point to remember in this regard is, 
while a sick hen may show lack of 
color in beak, shanks, vent and eye 
rings, there are enough other char- 
acteristics, or perhaps lack of them 
to throw her out. A laying hen is 
usually in good condition, always 
lively, and always has an appetite. 

As for the profits in culling, it is 
just about the difference in the feed 
bill for all the boarders, the labor in 
taking care of them, and the inter- 
est in the investment that has been 
put into them and their housing. In 
a way, it may be even more. A hun- 
dred hens making a profit are better 
than three times as many or any 
times as many breaking even. 



THE PLYMOUTH BOCKS 



By William C. Denny 



This complete breed book explains standard 
requirements and tells how t» select, mate and 
exhibit winners In all varieties. Subjects of 
special Importance to Plymouth Rock breeders, 
such as how to get correct barring In Barred 
Rocks, "Stay-white" plumage in White Rocks, 
correct, uniform color in Buffs, double mating, 
line breeding, strain building, etc., all are 
plainly and fully treated. 

Well Illustrated, Including three color plates, 
144 pages, 9 by 12 Inches. Price $1.00 postpaid. 
Address Poultry Keeper, Quincy, Illinois. 




Oar new book "For Better 
Poultry"^ives simple feed- 
ing directions which if fol- 
lowed will make your hens 
more healthy and vigorous 
and increase their egg pro- 
duction. This is especially 
true if you feed Sucrene But- 
termilk Egg Mash. This feed, 
rich in "vitamines," develops 
vigor and vitality in hens en- 
abling them to maintain a super— 
eggproduction all year round. Right 
now you should put your pullets on 

SUCRENE 
Buttermilk Egg Mash 

It will develop them rapidly to early laying maturity and 
give you twice the egg production that you can get from 
ordinary grain feed. If you cannot buy Sucrene Buttermilk 
bgg Mash from your dealer, write us. Do not accept any 
just as good" substitute for Sucrene. 

Get This New Poultry Book 

FRFF 64 of accurate in- 

1 iXLiU formation and advice on 
best breeds, houses, incubation, 
brooding; diseases and how to 
to avoid them; how to feed hens 
to keep in best condition and sus- 
tain heavy egg production; how 
to feed and raise most chicks 
from every hatch. Written by a 
prominent poultry expert. 
Write for it today. Sent 
free postpaid. Give the name 
of your feed dealer. 

American Milling Co. 
Dept. 15 Peoria. III. 




I 



"SUCCESSFUL" ESKS 

Most successful made. Our guaranty, strongest 
ever written, *ould put ue out of business if 
they weren't, and we've been at It 29 yesw. 
Poultry lessons FREE. Catalog fre«. Write now. II w j_OW 

DesMoine$lncubitQ?Ci.5652dSt.DcsMBines PRICCD 





Poultry Leg Bands 



Colored Leader, Adjustable, fit 

anything from bantam to goose, 
numbered consecutively, 5 colors: 
Red, Blue, Green, Yellow, Pink. 
100, $1.50; 50, $1.00; 25, 60c. 

Heavy Aluminum, numbered con- 
secutively, large raised figures, mil- 
lions sold, adjustable, will stay on. 
100, 60c; 50, 35c; 25, 20c. 

Celluloid Spiral, 5 colors, 
Red, Blue, Green, Pink, Yellow; 
can be easily distinguished. 

12 25 SO 100 250 500 

No. 1 Asiatics $.25 .45 J.75 J1.20 *2.7S J5.00 

No. 2 Rocks, Reds, etc. .20 .40 .60 1.00 2. 25 4.00 

No. 3 Leghorns, etc. . . .20 .35 .50 .90 2.00 3.50 

Prices are postpaid. State color and breed. 
Eureka Supply House, Box K, Mt. Morris, III. 




WH A AT ' S CAPON $!? ? 



A book that explains why Capons are the most profitable part of the poultry business and everything 
you will ever want to know about CAPONS. 50 pictures from life that show each step in the 
operation. List of Capon Dealers' addresses. Tells how to prevent "Slips," where to get the 
best and cheapest capon tools. Capons are immense eating. Big profits realized. Get wise. This 
book tells how. Copyrighted new and revised edition. Regular 50c copy, prepaid to your address 
(a short time only) for a Dime in coin or stamps. 

GEORGE BEUOY, R. R. 17, CEDAR VALE, KANSAS. 




1000 Breeders For Sale 

REGAL DORCAS WHITE WYAXDOTTES 

My Summer Sale List this season is the most complete 
list I have ever offered. The birds are all specially se- 
lected and were in my matings for 1922. Many of them 
will win in the large shows next Winter and all have 
grand breeding with generations of Regal Dorcas ancestry 
back of them. Bargain Prices. 

SPECIALS — 500 January and February cockerels and 
pullets that will be ready for the September shows. Send 
for a trio or pen of these beautiful chicks to fill out your 
string. 

FREE — Send for complete Summer Sale List. Twenty- 
page Catalogue also free. 

JOHN S. MARTIN, 
Box 408 - Port Dover, Out., Canada 



Page Number 12 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



LIGHT AND DARK BRAHMA'S 

Show birds and choice breeders in old 
and young stock for sale reasonable. 

MILLER POULTRY FARMS 
Lancaster, - - Mo. 



Give your hens a chance to do their best. 
Keep the bouses, runs end brooders 
sanitary with a BROWNS' AUTO-l 
SPRAY. Use it, too, in the garden and 
for spraying home fruit trees and doing 
many other jobs. Over 750,000 in use. 

Send today for Catalog and 
^Qi Spraying Calendar— free, 

THE E. C. BROWN CO. 
jcgWgg 895 Maple St., Rochester, N.Y. I 



RAISE RHODE ISLAND REDS 

"HE BE S.f A L L P UR P OS E BREED 



Your name and address will bring free 
educational literatureonRhode Island 
Reds and information why they are 
the greatest money-making poultry 
breed; also catalogs and circulars from 
leading Red breeders. For ful) informa- 
tion address 

RHOiiE ISLAND EFDCLUB of AMERICA 
W. H. Card, Sec, Box 914 , Manchester, Conn. 
I This ad paid for ' by C. P. Scott, Peoria, 111. I 





HARMLESS BUT POWERFUL 

Is "OCULUM." the Egg maker . It 
routs disease, makes bigger birds, and 
lots of eggs. This Journal 0. K's it. 
Sample and Booklet, 10c Bottles 50c 
and $1.00. 

GUARANTEED 

The "OCULUM" Co. 
Salem, - - Va. 



Ferrets 



-- For - 
Killing Rats 

and hunting rabbits. Instruction 
book and price list free. 

LEVI FARNSWARTH, 
New London, - - Ohio 

Cull Poor Layers— Save Feed 



Know how to tell the profit-making 
hens. Simple, easy-to-apply meth- 
ods and hundreds of secrets fully out- 
lined in new FREE BOOK, "Dollars 
and Sense i n the Poultry Business" ; 96 
pages; complete illustrations; written 
byT E.Quisenberry one of the World's 
leading poultry authorities. Write to- 
day for your free copy to, 

AMERICAN POULTRY SCHOOL 
Dept 4011 Kansas City, Mo. 



S. C. White, Brown and Buff 
LEGHOBN PULLETS 
$1.00 Each 

Yearling hens. Cock birds. We have 
over 10,000 head of High Class 
stock. Catalogue. 25 Standard va- 
rieties. 

The South Kenton Poultry Farm, 
Kenton, Ohio 
Chas. W. Wyllie, Supt. Geo. W. Cox, Prop. 



IMPROVING THE FARM FLOCK. 



"During the past year or so there 
seems to be a revived interest among 
farmers in keeping better stock and 
if they do not overdo the matter in 
the way of keeping more poultry 
than they can house and take care 
of in a profitable way it is sure to 
be a profitable part of their work. 
It is a mistake to start and raise 
from four or five hundred chickens 
the first year. Better if only enough 
is raised so as to have forty or fifty 
to carry through the first winter, 
then increase from these. Much 
trouble and money failures result 
from getting beyond your experience 
and over your capacity. 

Investing in high-priced poultry 
when raising and keeping hens for 
eggs and meat alone is useless. 
Neither would I invest or keep mon- 
grels. I have kept poultry for many 
years, in all ways and for all pur- 
poses and I have never found any 
use for a mongrel or scrub fowl. 
Pure and standard bred poultry is" 
the kind to raise and handle and it 
is not necessary to pay any fancy 
prices to secure good laying strains 
of this class of poultry. The advan- 
tages in keeping pure bred poultry 
are many. It seems to be a hard 
matter to get some people to look 
at it in this way but it is a fact and 
the mongrel is fast loosing ground. 

Farmers, as well as others, make 
a mistake in keeping, year after 
year, everything and anything which 
happens to raise. Careful and 
thorough culling and selection is 
one very important point in poultry 
keeping. Being able to select the 
best and most promising layers in 
the flock is knowledge that is worth 
a good deal to any poultry man. 
Special attention is being given to 
this part of poultry work in many 
sections of the country today and is 
sure to bring about a marked im- 
provement in the egg producing stock 
throughout the country. A good 
many have an idea that getting eggs 
in winter depends altogether on the 
housing, feed and care, and the lat- 
ter certainly does have much to do 
with it, but not all by any means. 
If the laying qualities are not in 
a hen she will not be a profitable 
egg producer no matter how she is 
handled. 

"If every farmer, large or small, 
who keeps hens for eggs will give 
this matter of selection careful 
thought and attention, keeping the 
best every time and all the time, in- 
stead of selling off and retaining by 
guess, he will soon be in shape to 
get more fall and winter eggs, bet- 
ter and stronger birds and the stock 
will grow better and better each 
year. Many farmers in this country, 
who keep poultry to much extent are 
now having their flocks looked over 
by specialists in culling and selec- 



BRED TO WIN AND LAY 



HORNER'S PEDIGREED S. C. REDS 



Cockerels for Sale. We can furnish you with Show birds, or strong fine breeders, $5.00 and 
ap. At Illinois State Fair, 1st Pen, In a hot class of 17 pens, also 2nd Pullet In a class 

1. 3, 4, 5; Pullets. 1, 2, 3, 4,; and Pens 1, 2; Champion 
Write for matting list. 



of 47. Adams County Fair, Cockerels', 
Pen; Champion Pullet. Pen mated. 



ERNEST G. HORNER, 



R. R. 7. 



Quincy, Illinois 



tion of layers and wonderful im- 
provement is resulting from this 
work. 

V. U. Couch. 



GOOD RATION ASSISTS IN EGG 
PRODUCTION 



How the profits in poultry-keeping 
are influenced by feeding a good ra- 
tion is shown by records of 200 well- 
matured White Leghorn pullets at 
the Ohio Experiment Station. 

During November and December 
these birds laid 4,805 eggs, which 
sold for $240.25; they consumed 
2,745 pounds of feed, which cost 
$44.03. They returned $196.22 over 
feed cost. 

The dry mash for the most produc- 
tive lot of fowls consisted of ground 
corn, two parts; middlings, one part; 
ground oats, one part; meatscraps, 
one part, by weight. In addition, a 
grain mixture of three parts corn, 
one of wheat and one of oats was 
fed. 

Grain and mash were fed in equal 
parts; the grain was fed in troughs 
in the evening so all the birds would 
go to roost well-fed. The small 
amount of grain left in the troughs 
was scattered in the litter for the fol- 
lowing morning. This method of 
feeding grain induced the birds to eat 
more mash. 

Mash was kept before the birds in 
open feeders, five feet of eating space 
being provided for each fifty birds. 

Oyster shell and grit were fur- 
nished in hoppers. The green feed 
consisted of one pound of dry oats 
daily to 50 birds fed when the 
sprouts were one to two inches long. 



LIFE FROM LIME 



Every poultry raiser knows the 
leading part that lime takes in the 
successful operation of his business. 
Show such a man chronically weak 
chickens; show him losses due to 
soft-shelled eggs broken in transit, 
and he will invariably ask why lime 
has not been included in the bill-of- 
fare of the roosts. Proofs are not 
needed to show that lime is an es- 
sential article in the diet of a fowl. 
Experience and research have dem- 
onstrated beyond question the truth 
of this statement. 

The obstacle that has hitherto 
stood in the way of the provision of 
the lime has been the apparent lack 
of sources whence this necessity 
could be derived. Each year the 
ever-growing poultry industry de- 
manded more lime. Laboratory pro- 
ducts could not be obtained in suf- 
ficient quantities. The same trouble 
was encountered in salvaging the 
oyster-shells from restaurants and 
hotels. It was then that a great 
natural source of lime was found. 

Off the coast of Louisiana there 
is a great reef five and a half miles 
long. Composed entirely of oyster- 
shells, this deposit has proved to be 
the biggest source of lime of which 
the poultry business boasts. It is 
estimated that there are 5,000,000 
tons of pure oyster-shell in that im- 
mense barrier. This shell when 
washed and crushed has been found 
to contain 98 per cent pure lime food 
for poultry. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 13 



TEN RULES FOR POULTRY 
KEEPERS 



Hatch all heavy breeds before 
May 1. 

Clean and disinfect the brooder 
house and equipment. 

Feed milk in some form all sum- 
mer. 

Feed no other liquid than milk for 
six weeks. 

Feed a dry mash containing animal 
protein from first week until maturi- 
ty. 

Move colony house or brooder coop 
to fresh ground before chicks are 
turned out. 

Keep growing chicks and laying 
hens separate throughout the sum- 
mer. 

Separate the sexes at 8 weeks old, 
or as soon as sex can be determined. 

Sell surplus cockerels as soon as 
marketable. 

House pullets not later than Oc- 
tober 1. 



FOR CLEANER EGGS 



Dirty eggs cost the producer 
money. The taste of an egg may not 
be affected by the amount of dirt, 
but the selling value is directly af- 
fected. The poultry extension de- 
partment of one University puts out 
the following suggestions for the pro- 
duction of clean eggs. They might 
do the work for you, if you try them 
out. 

Keep hens housed until 3 in the 
afternoon when the' ground is soft. 
Gather the eggs when the flock is 
turned out. 

Have at least one nest for each six 
hens. Keep plenty of straw in the 
nests. 

Have a good litter of straw on the 
floor. Hens wipe their feet if they 
have a "door-mat" to scratch in. 

Gather the eggs at 10 in the morn- 
ing to prevent tramping through the 
day. 

Keep the dropping boards clean 
and nail chicken wire under the 
roosts so that the hens cannot get 
on the dropping boards. 

Wash dirty eggs every day, and 
tnen market them as soon as pos- 
sible. Washed eggs should be sold 
for immediate consumption. 

Store eggs in cool, moist place 
free from mustiness or odor. A clean 
cellar is generally satisfactory. 

Avoid handling eggs unnecessar- 
ily. Keep them covered. Don't move 
them from a cool room to a warm 
one, as this causes them to sweat, 
and injures them. 



ILLINOIS STATE FAIR 



The catalogs of the next Illinois 
State Fair are now ready for mailing 
and we hope every breeder of poul- 
try in Illinois will seriously consider 
showing at least, a few of his best 
specimens. On account of lack of 



room a rule has been put in force 
allowing a breeder to exhibit in only 
three varieties. That is, you can en- 
ter in Barred Rocks, White Rocks 
and Buff Rocks or any other three 
varieties you are interested in and 
no more. This eliminates the car- 
load man but it cannot be helped. 
The above rule, however, does not 
apply to Turkeys, Geese, Ducks, Pig- 
eons or Rabbits as suitable places 
for housing them have been secured. 
As the dates are Sept. 19th to 26th, 
it is late enough to give all breeders 
ample time to mature their birds.The 
National Convention of the Amer- 
ican Poultry Association will be over 
and a full report of the convention 
will be read at the summer meeting 
of the Illinois State Poultry Asso- 
ciation which will be held on 
Wednesday of the Fair. The Judges 
so far assigned are O. L. McCord, D. 
E, Hale, F. S. Tarbill and D. T. 
Heimlich, and for the rabbits, C. S. 
Gibson, will hang the ribbons. The 
Officers of the State Association feel 
that it would be a mighty good idea 
for all specialty clubs to have a sum- 
mer meeting at the fair, and after 
the classes are judged to go over the 
class with the Judges and come to 
closer understanding about their 
birds. The enormous number of 
people who attend this State Fair 
and see your birds make it an ideal 
place to start your fall showing. If 
you are unable to attend the Fair do 
not let that interfere with you en- 
tering. For the men we have to 
care for your birds will give them 
every attention. They are like your- 
self, experienced poultrymen and 
want to see your birds in the pink 
of condition. If you have not al- 
ready received a catalog write W. W. 
Lindley, General Manager, State Fair 
Springfield, Illinois, and a copy of 
same will be sent you. Let's make 
this the greatest poultry show ever 
held at the Illinois State Fair. 

Sincerely yours, 

A. D. Smith. 



THE WYANDOTTES 

By J. H. Drevenstedt 

The standard qualities of all varieties of Wj- 
andottP9 are fully described and complete In- 
formation given on how to mate and breed, how 
to exhibit and judge them. Thousands of dol- 
lars were spent In research work, copy making, 
oil paintings, etc. No matter what variety of 
Wyandottes you breed you will find in this book 
Just the information yon need to bring success. 

Attractively illustrated, three color plates, 
160 pages. 9 by 12 inches. Price SI .00, post- 
paid. Address Poultry Keeper, O'i'ncy. Illinois. 



TURKEYS: THEIR CARE AND MANAGEMENT 



Some of the most successful breeders and com- 
mercial growers in the country tell of the 
methods by which they have accomplished their 
successes, and what they have done others also 
can do. If you raise turkeys in any number, 
this book wiil be worth many times Its price 
to you. 

Beautifully illustrated, one color plate, 96 
pages, 9 by 12 inches. Price 75c. postpaid. 
Address Poultry Keeper, Ouincy, Illinois. 



MAKE UP A CLUB 

Make up a club of your own, choosing the 
papers or magazines you want to take. Write 
and let me quote a special cut price. I can 
save you considerable money on your subscrip- 
tions. A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, Illinois. 



Why Not Get REAL TOM BARRON Leghorn Chicks and Eggs 

from a firm that has imported direct each year since 1915, at prices but 
little higher than the Commercial Hatcheries charge for common stock. 
Chicks $15.00 per 100, $13.50 per 100 after June 1st. Eggs $8.00 per 100 
with free replacement for all non fertiles. Orders filled promptly from this 
ad or send for descriptive list to 

COLEMAN MILES EGG FARM, Importers. Box N. Mt. Carroll, 111. 




Dr. David Roberts 
Poultry Tablets 

A combination of sulphocarbolates of 
calcium, sodium and zinc for the treat- 
ment and prevention of White Diar- 
rhea and all intestinal infections of 
baby chicks, as well as poultry in all 
stages of life and productivity. Drink- 
ing water for poultry should be medi- 
cated to overcome and prevent disease. 
The annual, poultry loss by disease is 
stupendous---over 50 per cent. 

Save Your Chicks 

Serve in fresh water. Aids digestion. 
Permits food to nourish them through 
their babyhood, the non-productive 
period when hardy bone and strong 
muscle is needed to give them a good 
start in their race for the laying period. 
They will reward you manyfold later 
on. Give them proper protection and 
you will find there is big money in 
poultry. Sold in tablet form. 

50 Tablets 50 Cents 

Poultry will drink when too sick to eat. 
Baby chick organs are peculiarly sensi- 
tive. They need something to ward off 
disease, particularly that most dreaded 
and destructive disease white diarrhea. 

A Tablet A Day 
Keeps Disease Away 

One package, 50 tablets, enough to 
medicate 50 gallons of water, a most 
effective and economical preventive, for 
only one cent a gallon. Use Dr. 
David Roberts Poultry Tonic, Louse 
Powder, Poultry Cholera Medicine, 
Poultry Roup Paste and Disinfectall, 
all known and tried prescriptions. 
Sold by our druggist, dealer, or direct. 
Dr. David Roberts Practical Home Veteri- 
narian, a veterinary doctor book, regular price 
$i -oo, tells you how to treat your own poul- 
try, also describes our 44 prescriptions — a 
prescription for every animal ailmenc. We 
will tell you how to get it FREE. 

Our Special Introductory 

Offer Send 25 cents, just one-half the 
regular price, for one package Dr. 
David Roberts Poultry Tablets, sent 
you postpaid, providing you give us 
the name of your druggist or dealer. 

DR. DAVID ROBERTS 
VETERINARY CO. 

135 Grand St., Waukesha, Wis. 




Drinking 
To Their 

HEALTH ¥ > 



Page Number 14 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



OUIJL OUT THE LOAFER HEN 



Don't Kill the Layer. Market the 
Culls and Save Feed. 



Nearly fifty per cent of the hens 
in every flock do not lay a sufficient 
number of eggs to pay for the cost 
of their feed alone. Nearly fifty per 
cent »f the male birds in every flock 
are not worth breeding from. There- 
fore, one-half of the poultry owned 
by the average poultryman consumes 
the profit that he makes on the other 
half of this flock. 

The most important thing that 
should be known by every poultry- 
man is to tell how to select his good 
layers, how to cull out his non-pro- 
ducers, how to pick the birds that 
consume feed but do not lay and how 
to pick the birds that should be held 
over as breeders. 

During the next few weeks is the 
important time to cull out these 
loafer hens. Hens that have ceased 
to lay eggs should be disposed of at 
once. By culling out these hens now 
you will not only save feed but you 
will get a higher market price for 
the culled out hens. The longer you 
keep these hens, the lower the price 
will be on the market. 

Cull them out and sell them as 
soon as they cease egg production. 
Keep the hens that lay late in the 
summer and into the fall months. It 
is easy and simple to tell these hens 
if you have the plain method and 
secrets given in "The Call of the 
Hen." A new revised edition of this 
book, by Walter Hogan. gives all the 
latest information on culling out the 
non-layers, selecting for heavy egg 
producers, breeding for egg produc- 
tion, culling, etc. Hundreds of thous- 
ands of copies of earlier editions of 
this book have been sold and gave 
entire satisfaction. 

The new revised edition is strictly 
down-to-the-minute in selecting by 
color changes, bodily changes, pig- 
mentation, changes in moulting — all 
the latest authorative information, as 
worked out by state experiment sta- 
tions, poultry investigators and lead- 
ing poultrymen. 

Endorsed by leading authoritives 
-^Government and State, county 
agents, farm bureaus, poultry clubs 
and experienced poultrymen every- 
where. Contains many illustrations 



Quality Chicks 



f\ ¥ T From best laying strains, 12 

J/O I J varieties. Breeding stock hens 

SI. 50 up. Cocks and cockerels. 
Free 32-page catalog and reduced price list. 
Missouri Poultry Farms, Columbia, Mo. 



If You Want More Eggs 

And Bigger Chicks 

feed our Egg Mash and Scratch feed. 
Egg Mash, $2.60 per cwt. Scratch 
feed, $2.10 cwt. 

300 EGG MASH CO. 
Canal Fulton, Dept 2 Ohio i 



LADY PURITAS 

m ^ PURITAS SPRINGS 
«=1S. C. W. LEGHORNS 

The World's Greatest Layers 

Trapnested for over 10 years 'without missing 
one day. Every nest on our farm is a trapnest. 
We trapnest every day of every year. 



Lady Layer 

Laid 326 Efefcs 
in One 
Year 



Reduced Prices 




ON 8 TO 12 WEEKS OLD PULLETS, COCKERELS AND BREEDING STOCK 

Puritas Springs Leghorns are world wonders. They shell out eggs regardless of weather condi- 
tions. They are also beautiful birds. The large white eggs they lay bring highest market 
prices. Thousands of our customers will hare no other strain of Leghorns; after trying other 
strains they found Puritas Springs Leghorns always lay the most eggs in winter as well as 
summer. The demand was so great this year that we were forced to refuse hundreds of orders 
for hatching eggs and baby chicks. If you once have Puritas Springs Leghorns you will want 
no others: you'll be the proud owner of the world's very best. Send for reduced Price List 
and mention if you have our large free instructive catalog. We are fair and square and guar- 
antee satisfaction in every way. We have hundreds of letters to prove it. 

Puritas Springs Poultry Farm, Box Pill, Avon Lake, Ohio s ^f^i$™l$ r 



showing just how to cull out loafers, 
how to tell good producers without 
trap nests, how to select the breeders 
to keep over, etc. 

It will prove worth ten times what 
you pay for it on a single season. 
Even if you raise but a few hens on 
your back lot, you need this book. 
The method is so simple that a child 
can apply it. 

Guaranteed absolutely to please 
you or money back. Send $2.00 for 
a copy, postage prepaid. Address all 
orders to Poultry Keeper, Quincy, 111. 



WHEN YOU BUY FOWLS 



If you want to buy new birds to 
increase the size of your flock or to 
infuse new blood into it you will find 
fall the best season in which to buy. 
Breeders that have birds to sell pre- 
fer to dispose of them now and can 
afford to sell them at a lower rate 
than they can next spring after they 
have been put to the bother and ex- 
pense of carrying the fowls thru the 
winter. 

Another reason for buying now is 
that the birds will be on hand for 
mating when desired and will have 
in advance several months' time to 
become accustomed to your methods 
of housing, feeding, etc. A further 
reason is that if the birds are ship- 
ped now while the weather is mild 
they are not likely to acquire colds, 
out of which may later develop roup 
or other serious ailments. 

The man that is going to put in a 
flock of purebred layers should se- 
cure the birds now. It frequently 
happens that for laying purposes 
breeders can be induced to part with 
low-scoring birds at a price little 
above what the birds would bring for 
dressed poultry. There are many 
such birds in the flocks of specialty 
breeders and fanciers. They are not 
fit to be used as breeders of show 
stock but for egg production they 
are as good as the prize winners. 

For example, a breeder of Brown 
Leghorns said to the writer: "I have 
some good birds that I will sell you 
if you only want layers, but I do 



BALLARD'S SUPREME WHITE ROCKS 



Have mated some fine pens for the eg 
P. \V. BALLARD, 



trade from my Champion winners. Mating list on request. 

GALESBURG, ILL. 



not want to let anyone know that I 
sold them to you. Some people come 
and buy these knowing that they are 
off in points and then complain be- 
cause they can't take them to shows 
and win prizes on them. Also they 
tell people they bought them of me 
and don't say that they bought them 
as layers only. The people that see 
them say that if they are representa- 
tive specimens of my birds they do 
not want any. This is not giving the 
fancier a square deal." 

It is not an honorable thing to 
buy low-scoring birds at bargain 
prices and then show them of as 
high-quality birds from so-and-so. 
On account of such treatment some 
breeders will not sell their low-scor- 
ing birds alive, but market them as 
dressed poultry. — R.S. 



LIKES P. K. 



"I am very much interested in 
poultry, and therefore am always 
waiting for my next issue of Poultn 
Keeper. I have taken, a while back, 
three poultry magazines, but am 
down to one — P. K. — its the best 
R. A. Noble, Calif. 



ILLINOIS STATE SHOW 

The next Illinois State Show will 
be held in Danville, Illinois, Jan. 3rd 
to 7th, 1923, at the new Stale 
Armory, undoubtedly the finest show 
room for poultry in Illinois. We 
want every Specialty Club in Illin- 
ois to meet with us and we will give 
the club twenty per cent of the 
entree fee back to use as they see 
fit and if the club shows one hun- 
dred specimen birds in the pen 
counting as two birds give a twenty- 
six piece of Community Silverware 
in a mahogany chest for the best 
display. 

We believe there will be more 
beautiful Silver Cups and Trophies 
awarded at Danville than anv State 
Show ever held and we hope it will 
be the largest ever held. The Judges 
will be the best we can secure and 
the same square and honest treat- 
ment accorded every exhibitor at the 
past State Shows will be yours if 
you enter there. Place Jan. Srd to 
7th, in your mind as one place you 
are going to show. You wont regret 



it . 



A. D. Smith, Secy. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 15 



I'A'I SMITH TO ACT AS ASSIST- 
ANT SUPERINTENDENT AT 
CHICAGO COLLISEUM 



The readers of the Poultry Keeper, 
especially the Illinois breeders, will 
be interested to know that Pat Smith 
of Quincy, Illinois, has been selected 
as one of the Superintendents for 
the Colliseum show, December 5-10. 

It is doubtful if there is another 
man in the state of Illinois that is 
better known to the breeders, or if 
there is another man that is as well 
qualified to handle the National Ex- 
hibition. He has had lots of exper- 
ience in local and state shows, also 
at the State Fairs, and the Colliseum 
management congratulate themsel- 
ves in having secured Mr. Smith's 
services. 

With Mr. Smith and Mr. Chas. G. 
Pape on the job, every breeder^in 
the country can rest assured that 
this department will be looked after 
as it should be. With the world's 
greatest judges, this combination 
cannot be duplicated by any other 
show in this country. 

It might be well now to make note 
of the dates, Dec. 5th. to 10th. Prem- 
ium lists November 1st. Entries 
closed November 15th. Owing to the 
uncertainity of mail, it is always best 
to write for a Premium list. I will 
be on my Arkansas farm, Crystal 
Route, Hot Springs, Arkansas, until 
August 3rd, but after the Conven- 
tion at Knoxville will be at my home 
address, 25 W. Washington St., In- 
dianapolis, Indiana. — Theo. Hewes, 
Secretary. 



ANCONAS 



R. C. ANCONA COCKERELS— Early hatched 
— cheap. Mrs. E. .!. Crawford. Owatonna, Minn. 



BABY CHICKS 



CHICKS— C. 0. D. Parcel Post. 2000 miles. 
Pay on arrival at your Post Office. Bargain 
prices. My 17th year. Literature free. C. M. 
La liver. Box 68, McAlisterville, Pa. 8-6 



BABY CHICKS — Half Million for 1922. Twelve 
leading pure breeds from heavy egg producing 
strains. Alive delivery guaranteed. Catalog. 
Smith Brothers Hatcheries, Mexico, Mo. 1-9 



BANTAMS 



BANTAMS AND EGGS— 22 Varieties . 2c stamp 
for circular. Fenn Bantam Yards, (Desk 77), 
I'clavan. Wis. 



BRAHMAS 



LIGHT BRAHMA HATCHING EGGS — $1.50 per 
15 prepaid. Mrs. A. Burcheil. Rossmoyne, Ohio. 



LIGHT BRAHMAS— Cavey Farm, Elkhorn, Wis 

12-12 



DOGS 



RABBIT HOUNDS, FOXHOUNDS. COON, 

Opossum. Skunk. Squirrel. Wolf. Groundhog 
dogs. Setters, Airedales. Circular 10c. Brown's 
Kennels, York Pa. 7-6 



O O 

| BREEDER'S CARDS | 

o o 

DUCKS AND GEESE 



EGGS— Mammoth Pekin 50-$5.00, 100-$8.00. 
White Holland also Bourbon Red Turkeys 10- 
$8.00. Mrs. Frank Spurling, Forest Park, 111. 

8-4 



LEGHORNS 



300 SINGLE COMB WHITE AND BROWN LEG- 

horns. 1 year hens, cockerels, pullets. Hatching 
eggs. A. Schroeder, St. Peter, 111. 12-12 



WHITE LEGHORNS 



S. C. WHITE LEGHORN COCKERELS FOR 

Sale — 12 weeks old, $1.50; 16 weeks old, $2.00; 
200 weeks old, $2.50, of D. W. Young and 
Barron strains. Robert Thompson, Walnut 
Grove, Minn. 



PULLETS — 75c each and up; Chicks, $10; Eggs, 
$6; Hens, $1.50 each, Pedigreed Cockerels, $3 
to $5 each, Others, $1 each; Cock Birds, $5 
each. Imported Barron and Young strains S. 
C. White Leghorns, raised separately. No hen 
under 248-egg record in six years breeding. Trap 
Nested, Pedigreed. Reduced prices. Circular. 
Brownstown Poultry Farm, Brownstown, Ind. 



BROWN LEGHORNS 



S. C. DARK BROWN LEGHORNS— Eggs only. 
6c each delivered. Willis Fairbanks, Mora, 
Minn. 



W. W. KULP, BOX 30, POTTSTOWN, PA. — 

The leaders In size and contest winners. Cata- 
log. Both combs. 



BUFF LEGHORNS 



BUSINESS BEAUTY BUFF LEGHORNS — High 
record layers, large eggs. This year breeders 
$24.00 per dozen. Joseph Benedict, Chevy 
Chase, Md. 



SINGLE COMB BUFF LEGHORN YEARLING 

hens $2.00 each. Eggs and breeding pens. Ar- 
thur Worthington, R. 3, Two Rivers, Wis. 7-2 



BLACK MINORCAS 



SINGLE COMB BLACK MINORCAS — Early 
hatched pullets, Cockerels. Also few breeders 
winter layers. Table Egg Farm, Lookout, Penn. 



BLUE ORPINGTONS 



LOOK — Royal Blue Orpingtons. Winners. John 
Dnangst, 1214 Prairie Ave., Freeport, HI. 8-12 



BUFF ORPINGTONS 



SINGLE COMB BUFF ORPINGTON COCKER- 

els. February hatched. Also several • good 
yearling pens. Walter Goessling, 930 Jeffer- 
son, St., Quincy, 111. 



RHODE ISLAND REDS 



REDS THAT LAY! The strain that pays. 
Rose Comb. Eggs. Circular. Albert Bern- 
hardt, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. 



ROSE COMB RED EGGS— From prize winners 
and record layers. (Bean strain.) Mating list. 
Daugherty's Poultry Farm, Metcalf. 111. 8-2 



PIGEONS 



OFFER— mated Homers. $2.00 pair. Beautl- 
White Homers, $3.00 pair. Get my prices 
on Runts, Carneaux. Maltese Hens. Free book- 
let. Squab Mannual 50c. Charles B. Gilbert. 
2210 Almond St.. Philadelphia. Pa. 10-6 



WHITE ROCKS 



SNYDER'S WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS— Stock 
for sale. Eggs. $2.00 per setting. A. E. Sny- 
der, Dellwood Poultry Yards, Dellwood, N. Y. 



BARRED ROCKS 



"CACKLERS" ..ARE PUREBRED BRED-TO- 

Lay Barred Rocks. Trapnested by Geo. W. 
Pratt, Cropsey, 111. Bargain prices on either 
young or old stock. Unrelated pens. Write 
wants plainly. Circular free. 



PARKS ROCKS— Eggs that will hatch. Cata- 
log. W. W. Kulp, Box 30, Pottstown, Pa. 



MY VICTORY STRAIN OF BARRED ROCKS— 

Won at Toledo, O., Nov. 29th to Dec. 4th, 1921. 
3, 4, 5. Ex Cock; 2 Ex Cockerel; 1, 2, Ex Hen; 
3 Ex Pullet; 1, 2, Pullet Bred Cock; 2 Cock- 
erel Bred Pen; Silver Medal for Best Display. 
Barred Rock Club shape and color specials. 
Send for photo of my winning birds. J. T. 
French, 838 West Grove Place, Toledo, Ohio. 



O — o 

| BREEDER'S CARDS | 

o o 

PHEASANTS 



$9.00 PER POUND for pheasants. Easy raised. 
Great demand. Complete book breeding 3G var- 
ieties: Pheasants, Peafowl. Illustrated natural 
colors $1.00. Colored catalog: 400 varieties 20c. 
Bargains. Lowest prices. All kinds Wild Game, 
Turkeys, Quail, Peafowl, Pigeons, Pet Stock, 
Poultry, Waterfowl. Eggs for hatching. Ex- 
changes made. (1000 Pheasants. Eggs — want- 
ed.) U. Pheasantry, 1026 West 24th, Los 
Angeles, Calif. 6-3 



SEVERAL VARIETIES 



ALL KINDS OF PUREBRED PRIZEWINNING 

poultry and pets. Prices reasonable. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. Peter Bros., Randolph, 
Minn. 



FOR SALE — Pure bred last year's hens at one 
dollar each. White Orpington, Shepherd An- 
oona, English White Leghorn, extra good. 
Henry Mearns, Louisville, 111. 



APRIL HATCHED PULLETS OR COCKERELS 

— From Parks pedigreed stock direct. Also 
(Woods) Light Brahmas, $2 each; $22 dozen. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Eva Bojar, St. Be- 
nard, Ohio. 8-3 



GOLDEN PHEASANT EGGS $3.50 SETTING. 

Black Siberian Rabbits $4.25 pair. Guinea pigs 
$1.75 pair. Squirrels $5.00 pair. Roller Canar- 
ies $5.50. Parrots $8.00. F. Sudow, Los An- 
geles, California. 



SHEPPARD S. C. ANCONA AND PENNSYL- 

vania S. C. W. Leghorn eggs for hatching, 
$2.50 per 15. H. E. Ritter, Middleburg, Pa. 



450 VARIETIES: Wild Game, Peafowl, Pig- 
eons, Pheasants, Rabbits, Wild Turkeys, Ban- 
tams, Poultry, Quail, Deer, Geese. Colored cata- 
log, 20c. U. Pheasantry, Los Angeles, Cal. 



TURKEYS 



WILD TURKEYS. $28.50 pair. $4.75 setting. 
Bronze, Holland, Burbon $4.00 setting. Ferd. 
Sudow, 102G West 24th, Los Angeles, Calif. 6-3 



EGGS FROM HIGH CLASS OLD STOCK— Mam- 
oth White Holland, Mamoth Bronze and Bour- 
bon Red. Ten $8.00; Twenty $15.00; Thirty 
$19.00. Mrs. Frank Spurling, Forest Park, 111. 

5-4 



SILVER WYANDOTTES 



SILVER WYANDOTTE COCKS— $3.00 ..each. 
Rosetta Ralston, Locust Grove, Okla. 



WHITE WYANDOTTES 



WHITE WYANDOTTE HENS — Two cocks and 
five young cockerels. Pair New Zeland Red 
Rabbits. Homer and Carneaux Pigeons. Lew 
H. Stewart, Route 4, Sioux City, Iowa. 



POULTRY SHOW 



MADISON SQUARE GARDEN SHOW— Buyer's 
Guide (list of exhibitors) free. Official Marked 
Catalog 75 cents. Both books very valuable. 
Send for them. Address D. Lincoln Orr, Sec'y, 
Box 23, Orr's Mills— Cornwall, N. Y. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



ONE HUNDRED EGG PRAIRIE STATE IN- 

cubator and 50 chick Hover to trade for chick- 
ens and eggs. E. L. Hiatt, 2700 Scioto Trail, 
Portsmouth, O. 



WANTED— To buy farm from owner. Give 
price, description. Jas. Houck, Box 104, Tif- 
fin, Ohio. 



FOR SALE — Check protector, adding machine, 
parcel-post scales, cornet, caponizing outfit, 
hygrometer, Sure Hatch Incubator. Write for 
description and price. Want to buy Laken- 
velders. F. Raymond Benson, Elgin, 111. 



RADIO FOR EVERYBODY. Learn at home, 
the Construction of Radiophone and Telegraph 
Receivers for Beginners", of 18 chapters, fully 
illustrated. 80 cents post paid. Free catalogs 
of all the latest and best Radio. Automobile, 
Tractor and Electrical books. V. M. •Coue.h, 
Ithaca, N. Y. 



PRINTING 



PRINTING SPECIALS— During June, July. 
August. 100 sheets linen finish note paper and 
100 envelopes both printed with your three line 
advertisement $1.25, 200 note paper and 100 en- 
velopes SI. 50 postpaid. Summer sale list brist- 
ling with bargains, for stamp only. Model 
Printing Company. Manchester, Iowa. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

The classified advertisers In POULTRY 
KKIOPER are coining money fast this year, 
it pays to keep your announcement before 
the people. That Is the way to establish 
u reputation for your business. Why not 
go after the people, get good prices, and 
make more money this year? 

BATES 

Rules for Ads. Classified under proper 

Headings are as follows: 
! month 6c per wor« 

2 months He per word 

3 months 16c per word 

4 months 20c per word 

1 yi-ar 50c per word 



Let The Hens Lag 

More 

Remove The Lice and TheijWiU 



IT IS the healthy hen that lays a good egg and lays it regularly. Hens full 
of vitality and vigor can keep up a heavy egg production. Hens free from 
lice and mites — they put money in your pocket. A hen worried to death with lice cannot 
lay if she wants to. Feeding high priced feed to lousy chickens is a dead loss. Don't do it. 
Use the new way to kill lice and use LICECIL. No dusting, no dipping, no painting. Hang 
up the original open bottle. It acts like magic. It will help to put a few drops in nests 
and on roosts. Then uncork the bottle, hang it up in coop or hen -house and the powerful 
evaporating vapors which leave the bottle will do the rest. 





Ki//SL/ce 




Protect your fowls from the powerful and insidious 
lice and mites that suck the life blood of your birds. 
These parasites allowed to run rampant in a hen 
house will suck more blood, more vitality every night 
than fowls can replace by the assimilation of large 
quantities of food during the day. This is a money- 
making and a money-saving proposition. Think it over. Extra care must 
be taken thatnot only the birds are kept clean, but every crack and crevice 
should be purified as well. Use LICECIL as indicated and in a few days 
your entire flock and hen house will be rid of every louse and mite. 

How to use LICECIL 

Simply put a few drops in the nest and on the roosts, hang the uncovered 
bottle in coop or hen house. The powerful evaporating vapors which leave 
the bottle descending in mist form penetrate feathers, cracks, crevices 
everywhere. Lice, mites, chiggers, roaches, bed bugs, ants, etc., have no 
lungs. They breathe through the pores of the body and are destroyed 
by LICECIL vapors. Will not injure chicks. Testimonials from 
every Stateinths Union tell of wonderful results from its use. 

Give it a Fair Trial 

If you prefer to fight poultry pesta in the old way— it is cer- 
tainly your privilege to do so. But your own best interest, 
and the success others are having, will lead you to give 
UCECILafair, honest trial at the earliestopportunity. 

1 Bottle, $1.00 — 3 Bottles $2.50 
12 Bottles $9.00 — All Postpaid 

AMERICAN SUPPLY CO. 
DEPT. P. K. 

Quincy, Illinois 



Evidence ! 

American Supply Co., 
Quincy. 111., 
Dear Sirs: 

Enclosed please find $2.50 for 3 
bottles of the Licecil. With great 
success I have used it and am more 
than pleased with It. 

I have no more trouble with lice. 
It is the first thing I have got that 
I could and would gladly recommend 
it te any person. 

MBS. F. L. KAENS. 

Riverside Dr. 



Madrid, Nebr.. Mar. 15, 1922. 
American Supply Co., 
Quincy. 111. 
Dear Sirs: 

Find enclosed check for four dol- 
lars ($4.00) for which send me one 
gallon of Licecil. 

I used 3 bottles of Licecil last 
summer, and think it is the best louse 
and mite killer I ever used. 
Yours truly. 

EMIL BENSON, 
B. F. D. No. 2, Madrid. Nebr. 



a*. 




Chicken Mites Filled 



With Lice 
Away 

Hens Will 
Lay. 



smA 




v firstof 



THE 




POULTRY KEEPER 



A JOURNAL FOR EVERY ONE INTERESTED 
IN MAKING POULTRY PAY • DEVOTED PARTIC- 
ULARLY TO PRACTICAL POULTRY KEEPING* 



Try the New Way to Kill Lice and Mites 

Little red mites are doing much damage. They suck the very life out of hens. 

A hen worried to death with Lice and Mites cannot lay if she wants to. But 
she eats just the same. It is a dead loss ito keep lousy chickens and allow them 
to consume high priced feed. Don't do t. Use 

KILAMITE 



(KILLS RED MITES) 



KILAMITE leaves the bottle in powerful, evap- 
orating vapors which descend in a misty form 
throughout the room, penetrating cracks and 
crevices everywhere. Lice and Mites have no 
lungs, they breathe through the pores of the 
body. Neither lice nor mites can possibly stay 
where the odor of KILAMITE is found. It is 
like "Poison Gas" to insects, mites, chiggers, 
roaches, bed bugs, ants, etc. Once a bottle 



broke in. transit and the man handling it 
thought from the odor it was "Poison Gas." 
When he read the label he said insects certainly 
could not live where that odor prevailed. It is 
not poisonous to human beings, animals, or 
fowls or anything that breathes through lungs. 
It is "Poison Gas" to all insects that do not 
have lungs but which secure their oxygen by 
the passage of air through pores in the body. 
They can not stand the odor of it for a minute. 



HOW TO USE KILAMITE 

In order to prove effective sprinkle a few drops of KILAMITE in the 
nests, on the roosts or anywhere about the hen house, and HANG 
THE UNCORKED BOTTLE SOMEWHERE WITHIN THE BUILD- 
ING. The powerful evaporating vapors which leave the bottle pene- 
trate everywhere. The presence of this odor in your hen house will 
mean that it will be free of Lice and Mites. 
It will go farther if you mix it with a little 
kerosene. It is well known that kerosene is 
somewhat effective against lice but does not 
kill red mites. Mix a little KILAMITE with 
it and it becomes deadly for mites and lice. 
By doing this the use of KILAMITE becomes 
a most economical and effective method of 
putting an end to your lice and mite troubles. 
We have sold thousands of bottles and have 
satisfied customers throughout the world. 
Many people buy it by the gallon so as to 
have it always on hand. 




Ctickti Mile. TV.ttt Will tic lit. Blot* 
tf Tcilbful Bch. 




1 Bottle, $1.00; 
3 Bottles, $2.50; 
12 Bottles, $9.00; 
1 Gallon, $4.00; 
5 Gallons, $15.00. 

All prepaid. 

Money back if it fails 



American Supply Company 

Dept. K. QUINCY, ILLINOIS 

ASZ ■YOUR DEALEE 



THE 




A J OURNAL FOR 
EVERYONE 
IWTERESTE.D 



KEEPER 



IN MAKING 
POULTRY 
P A V 



Vol. XXXIX 



SEPTEMBER, 1922 



No. 6 



Intensive Poultry Keeping 



By F. RAYMOND BENSON 



When we jotted down the above 
title, our mind involuntarily went 
back to the time we discovered the 
Back-Lotter in these pages. Inten- 
sive poultry keeping does not nec- 
essarily mean the keeping of poultry 
on the back lot and while this is of- 
ten the case, yet many times we see 
it practiced on larger pieces of 
ground. While perhaps it is espec- 
ially adapted to the— small lander yet 
the subject will prove of especial in- 
terest to all poultrymen due to the 
fact that we all feel the trend to- 
wards smaller and smaller parcels of 
land. After all just what is inten- 
sive poultry keeping? A friend says 
"hat it is the growing of two chick- 
ens where one can hardly make a 
go of life. That is not exactly true 
for it gives a wrong impression. In- 
tensive poultry keeping means that 
we concentrate our efforts to the 
keeping as many fowls in a given 
amount of space as possible, keeping 
the vigor and productiveness up to 
par. It is the opposite of extensive 
poultry keeping. Looking over the 
poultry keepers we know we find 
that many of them practice inten- 
sive poultry keeping in various de- 
grees. 

Intensive poultry keeping seems 
to be very popular and it might be 
well for us to look into its advan- 
tages and disadvantages so that we 
may judge whether it would be ad- 
vantageous for us to attempt it. 

Perhaps one of the biggest advan- 
tages is that only a small amount of 
capital is required to make a start. 
Where wide ranges are used the 
cost is almost prohibitive but with 
the intensive method Ave need but a 
small plot of ground, small house 
and we are ready for business. One 
has the advantage of adapting such 
a plant to his pocket book and many 
times this is very important when 
work is scarce and money is none 
too plentiful. So we find that the 
intensive method appeals to the be- 
ginner or small investor as best fit- 
ted to his immediate ability to build 
and equip. 



We have already made mention of 
the fact that any available land can 
be used for an intensive poultry 
plant. It is not necessary to buy 
many acres which might be located 
far from ones place of business. On 
the other hand a city lot is often 
the means of a good start along this 
line and sometimes even the part of 
the back of the residence is made use 
of for - the beginning. It is usually 
best to use the ground available in- 
stead of trying to locate in new 
places as the initial investment is 
smaller. 



Another fine feature is that the 
intensive poultry keeper is able to 
concentrate on one feature of the 
business such as egg production and 
giving his exclusive attention to this 
is able to do more effective work. 
The extensive poultry keeper has so 
many branches of his business that 
it takes all his time to watch the 
different ends of his business and 
unless he is a mighty good business 
man he may loose out while with the 
intensive poultryman he has but one 
yoal and he works unceasingly to- 
(Continued on page 8) 




One of the Ferris Winners 

Chicago Coliseum Show,Dec.1921 

27J EGG PEDIGREE 
Bred and Owned ]bu 

Geo.B.Ferris, GrandRapids.Mich. 



Page Number 4 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



POULTRY KEEPER 

Qulncy, Illinois 
401 Hampshire Street 
A Journal for Everyone Interested In Making 
Poultry Pay. 
Issued the First of Each Month 

Subscription Price : 
50c a year; Single Copies, 5c 
Foreign Postage: Twenty-five Cents a Tear 
Additional. 

Entered at the Qulncy, 111., Post Office as 
Second Class Matter. 

Remittances should be made by Draft, Money 
Order, Express Order or Registered Letters. 
Small sums will be accepted In United States 
one or two cent postage stamps. 

Change of address — When this Is desired, be 
sure to give old and new Post Office addresses. 

All subscribtions Invariably discontinued at 
expiration. Subscribers will confer a favor by 
reporting to us Irregularities In receiving the 
Poultry Keeper. 

Advertising rates made known on application. 

Poultry Keeper readers are cordially invited 
to express their opinion on any subject of 
poultry that will be of Interest to our readers, 
give helpful talks to the Inexperienced and ask 
questions In any department. 

A. OTIS ARNOLD, Editor. 

F. RAYMOND BENSON, Ass't Editor. 



jgjuErgg I THE PUBLISHER OF THIS 
ATOEFcf MAGAZINE IS A 

^SKOTgfr life member of the 

American Poultry Association 



FALL WORK 



As fall approaches we are remind- 
ed that hot weather is leaving us 
again and we must look about our 
coops and see that everything is in 
order for cold weather. Perhaps it 
may seem a little early to think of 
winter but observation has convinced 
us that it is a wise policy to prepare 
for winter as early as September and 
October. 

See that the doors and windows 
are tight and all broken glass re- 
placed. Look to the roof and make 
it waterproof so that it may shed 
hard storms. Perhaps an addition to 
the poultry house is needed in which 
case it should be built at once. 
The floors, dropping boards and 
nests should be carefully inspected 
and repairs made. 

Make no mistake, winter is com- 
ing and should you delay in this mat- 
ter you will probably have the un- 
pleasant experience of having a visit 
from roup, chicken pox or some oth- 
er serious disease. Each year hun- 
dreds of poultrymen experience many 
difficulties which could have been 
avoided had foresight been used 
and it would be well for us to learn 
our lesson by example rather than 
by experience. 

Let us make ready for the coming 
of winter so that the flow of eggs 
may not be reduced and thereby 
keep the income from the flock as 
great as possible. 



PASS IT ON 



The writer receives many, many 
letters from poultrymen and poultry- 
women all over the world and there- 
by has untold opportunities to do 
favors for these poultry friends. The 
most encouraging thing is the way 
so many of these friends respond to 
our help and advice. It is no un- 
common thing for them to go to 
some inconvenience in order that we 



may extend the bounds of our ser- 
vice. 

The world is certainly growing 
better all the time. We believe this 
thoroughly. Once in awhile some 
sour livered pessimist comes across 
the way and tries to make us think 
that everything is headed for the 
bow-wows but we know the world is 
right and things are not as bad as 
they seem so let the grouch rave if 
it comforts him. 

Pass on the good things. Keep the 
the world bright. Do your neighbor 
a favor and prove yourself a brother 
to mankind. We all like the sunny 
fellow who is anxious to keep every- 
body happy and it would be a fine 
thing if every reader of POULTRY 
KEEPER would adopt the motto of 
passing on a favor or kindness. 
It makes all feel better and the world 
would be a much better place in 
which to live. 



SELL SURPLUS STOCK 



If you have not already done so we 
suggest that you sell surplus stock at 
once. Do not' make the mistake of 
keeping more fowls than you have 
room for — in other words do not 
crowd. Often some ambitious breed- 
er will raise more fowls than he 
should and then when fall comes he 
will crowd them into small quarters, 
thinking it poor policy to cut prices 
in order to sell surplus birds. Us- 
ually it will be found the best policy 
to keep only such fowls as can be 
handled properly and the balance 
should be sold even if the price must 
be shaded to some extent. 

Many years ago the writer had a 
fine bunch of surplus birds at this 
time of the year and crowded them 
into a small house expecting to sell 
them along towards spring at good 
prices. The winter was unusually 
severe and we did not ship many and 
those which were sold had their 
combs frozen and the experience 
proved very unsatisfactory. In the 
end we sold them for just about 
enough to break even. It is far bet- 
ter to sell your fowls in the fall un- 
less you have plenty of room in 
which to house them. 



SPECIALTY CLUBS 



For the sake of an argument let 
us suppose that the reader is a breed- 
er of Rhode Island Reds. No doubt 
he finds a ready sale for all his sur- 
plus fowls of good quality. It being 
a well known fact that a good Red 
will command a good price we follow 
on to the conclusion that the poultry- 
man is making money. Did you ever 
stop to consider why a good Red 
commands a high price? Various 
reasons may enter into this matter 
but the demand for good stock has 
more to do with the price than any 
other one item. What causes this 
demand? Back East in New Eng- 
land there lives a man by the name 
of Card who is Secretary of the 
Rhode Island Red Club of America 
and Mr. Card and the hundreds of 
members of this Club are boosting 
Reds 365 days of each year. That 
is the reason Reds are worth more 
money. 

So it is with all breeds. No breed 
can long prosper without having a 



Specialty Club back of it to boost 
it and advertise it. 

Your duty in this matter is per- 
fectly plain. You should join and 
support the Club back of your breed 
of poultry. Perhaps there may be a 
little of the selfish motive back of 
this but no red-blooded man wants 
to lay down on the job and let others 
carry all the burden. Let us have 
a large support of the Specialty 
Clubs. 



LET US CALL A HALT 



Some weeks ago the authorities 
arrested 100 men near Springfield, 
Mass., and stopped a cock fighting 
derby. The same day near Roches- 
ter, New York 132 arrests were made 
for the same reason. 

Men who pride themselves on their 
ability their efficiency and their pow- 
ers still appear to loose all control 
of themselves when they will be pres- 
ent at or encourage a cocking main. 
We cannot understand how a man 
can find pleasure or recreation in 
such cruel and heartless past time 
as fighting cocks. Perhaps the un- 
educated and uncouth members of 
civilization of foreign countries 
might find pleasure in such sport, if 
it may be so called but surely no in- 
telligent and upright American 
would want to encourage the game. 
We believe those arrested in the 
above instances must have been for- 
eigners who have not yet caught the 
spirit of American fairness. 

Let us call a halt in the past time 
and bend our energies to the greater 
and better aim of producing food or 
beauty of feather and form. This 
is far more noble and more in keep- 
ing with American ideals. We trust 
that every reader of POULTRY 
KEEPER will use their influence to 
further this matter. 



HOW ABOUT WINTER 
GREEN FOOD? 



So much has been said of late 
years about the value of green food 
for poultry that the majority of 
poultry keepers make an attempt to 
supply it in some form. 

As fall approaches it is well that 
we face the problem again and make 
some provision to meet the need. 
Should you be so fortunate as to 
have a surplus of beets, mangles, 
cabbage or other like green stuff, 
your solution is at hand but most 
poultrymen find that it is necessary 
to sprout oats for their fowls. Per- 
haps this is a very lucky thing for 
sprouted oats do much to keep the 
flock in good health and we know 
that health is very essential. 

It is possible to sprout oats with 
home made contrivances but it pays 
to purchase a well made sprouter. 
They work so much more efficiently 
and with less labor and are quite 
satisfactory. 

Perhaps it would be a good plan 
to look up an oat sprouter now so 
as to have it when you need it. Don't 
make the mistake of buying a sprout- 
er simply because it is cheap but 
rather purchase one which will meet 
your requirements even should it 
cost a little more. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 5 




2440 




to 164000 



Buckeye Mammoths built in three sizes: 
No. 7 Capacity . . 10,368 eggs 
No. 8 Capacity . . 4,608 eggs 
No. 6 Capacity . . 2,440 eggs 



Egg- Capacity in Four Years 



INDICATIONS OF DISEASE 



A short 'time ago we stopped to see 
a young poultryman and found he 
was having trouble with his poultry. 
Investigating the droppings we found 
a clew to the trouble but the owner 
was much surprised that we should 
look to the droppings in our search 
for the cause of the sickness. 

Perhaps some of our readers may 
not know that one of the best indi- 
cators of fowl's health is the drop- 
pings. The droppings should be of 
sufficient consistency to hold their 
shape, but not too hard. In color 
they should be dark, shading off into 
grayish white. If the droppings are 
soft or pasty and of a brownish or 
yellowish color, it indicates too much 
carbohydrates or a lack of meat 
scraps. If on the other hand they 
appear watery and dark, with splash- 
es of red mucus in them, it indicates 
too much meat. A greenish watery 
diarrhoea usually indicates unsani- 
tary conditions. 

Successful poultrymen watch the 
dropping board each morning and 
are thus warned of any change and 
able to remedy the trouble. It pays 
to look after this matter with more 
than usual interest. 



NEW FEATURES OF KANSAS 
CITY SHOW 



The Annual Heart of America 
Poultry Show will be held in Con- 
vention Hall at Kansas City on Jan. 
2nd to 7th. The show is about four 
weeks later than usual, but it will 
come right at the time when poultry 
raisers want cockerels, breeders, 
hatching eggs, baby chicks and poul- 
try supplies. Judges of National rep- 
utation have been employed. 

One of the interesting features of 
the show will be an egg laying con- 
test. Another will be a demonstra- 
tion and display of all kinds of foods 
made from poultry and eggs. It is 
stated that eight hundred different 
dishes can be made by the use of 
eggs. The actual preparation will 
be demonstrated during the show for 
the purpose of creating a greater de- 
mand for the consumption of eggs. 
There will be of course an educa- 
tional program during the week. 

In addition to the wonderful dis- 
play of standard bred poultry which 
has always been seen at this show a 
new feature will be a display of la- 
dies hats made entirely of poultry 
feathers or trimmed with feathers 
from poultry. 

A square deal will be guaranteed 
to every exhibitor. Write to T. E. 
Quisenberry, Sec'y-, for a premium 
list. This association solicits your 
birds and your hearty cooperation. 



The great New York State Fair 
is to be held September 11-16. This 
will be some show and you better 
hitch up your auto and attend. 



The loss and damage to egg ship- 
ments has been greatly decreased 
during the past year, in fact during 
1920 the loss amounted to $1,267,- 
229.87 while during 1921 only $375,- 
000 was charged up to this item. 
Poultrymen are learning to pack eggs 
better for shipment. 



Another amazing instance of 
rapid and sound growth, due to 
real business methods and the 
Buckeye Mammoth — the real 
business incubator. 

Four years ago the Farrow-Hirsh 
Company, of Peoria, installed 
their first Buckeye Mammoth — 
a No. 6, replacing a 5,000 -egg 
machine of another make. Their 
satisfaction was expressed a year 
later when they purchased seven 
more No. 6 Buckeyes and one No. 
7. Last year they added three 
No. 7's. This year they have al- 
ready purchased ten more No. 7 
Buckeyes, giving them a total 
egg-capacity of 164,672. 

While they have quadrupled the 
size of their hatchery since they 
began, they have increased their 
egg-capacity more than 67 times 
— a remarkable illustration of the 
compactness and space-saving of 
Buckeye Mammoth Incubators. 



They attribute much of their suc- 
cess to the accuracy with which 
they can gauge each Buckeye 
hatch — no guesswork — the 
strong, robust quality of the 
chicks, and the extremely low 
labor and operating cost. They 
have steady, satisfied customers 
in every state in the Union. 

Today there are more than eight 
hundred successful hatcheries 
throughout the United States and 
Canada using Buckeye Mam- 
moth Incubators — and not a 
single instance of failure. 

We will be glad to send our Buck- 
eye Mammoth Catalog which 
tells all about this remarkable 
invention. Let us show you how 
to start small and grow big in the 
commercial hatchery business. 

The Buckeye Incubator Co. 
1115 Euclid Ave., Springfield, Ohio 

World's Largest Manufacturers of 
Incubators and Brooders 



Blip Irtf^l Ttf3 mammoth 
XM^XXX^^y V> incubators 



Page Number 6 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Start Feeding Sprouted 
Oats NOW. Have a Long 
Winter Egg Season at 
Cold Weather Prices. 



Get 100% More Eggs 



OJRN loafing g 
hens into in- 
dustrious lay- 
ers — have eggs to 
sell at top-notch 
prices, by feeding 
sprouted grrain. Onebu.' 
cats, wheat or rye makes 
3 bu. of tempting, crisp 
treen feed in the 

"SUCCESSFUL" 

Sectional Grain Sprouter 

Knocks the feed problem into a cocked 
bat, takes care of young: chicks too — 
makes them grow. Double steel walls — 
fireproof— cannot warp, shrink or swell. 
Lasts a lifetime. Write todey for booklet and 
offer. Booklet on Proper Care of Chicks, 10c. 
DES MOINES INCUBATOR COMPANY 
c> ; 5 3rd Street Des Moines, la. 



MILLER'S 

TEE OLD SELLABLE ILLINOIS HATCHERY. 
Select Chicks from Heavy Laying Hens. 

White and Brown Leg- 
horns, 50-$7, 100-J13, 
5O0-5G2.50. Barred Rocks 
and 3. C. Reds, 60-58. 
100-$15, B00-$72.50. W. 
Wyandottes, W. Rocks, 
R. C. Reds, 50-58.50, 
100 - $16., 500 - $77.50. 
Black Langshan, Buff 
Orpington, Parks Barred 
Rocks, 50-$9, 100-$17, 
500-582.50. S. C. An- 
conas, 331 Egg Strain, 
80-58.50, 100-518, 500-587.50. Buff Rocks, 50- 
$9.50, 100-518.00, 500-587.50. Wlilte Orpingtons, 
60-510.50, 100-520.00. 100 per cent Live Delivery 
Guaranteed. Prepaid Parcel Post. Order Now 
Prom This Ad and Save Time. Reference, 
Stsle Bank. Catalogue Free. 
MI1XEB HATCHERY, Box K, Heyworth, 111. 





— ~£k$3 2 



Improper Feeding' 

I bought a cockerel and when I got him home 
I noticed that he had bowel trouble. The 
droppings were a rich yellow. In about a 
week my whole flock was affected and the 
egg yield dropped from 27 to as low as 3 eggs. 
Give me a cure if possible. 

A. W"., Alaska. 

Without other data we would say 
that improper feeding was the cause 
of this trouble. A lack of carbohy- 
drates or perhaps too little meat 
scraps might have caused it. Again 
it might have come from a dozen 
causes but it is evident that the ra- 
tion was at fault and then it de- 
veloped into more serious things. A 
change in the rations and the feed- 
ing of charcoal would be of great 
help. We would look well to the 
quality of the feed as it might be 
moldy or unfit for use. 



Cliicks Die 

I have started to raise some chickens and I 
bought 50 day old chicks and they seem alright 
but when I turn them out in the morning I 
have from one to two dead each morning. Can 
you tell me what to do as we are young in 
the business ? 

Mrs. F. A. S.. New Jersey. 

It is quite impossible for us to 
give you much help as you did not 
give us any details. Lice might 
make the trouble or perhaps it is 
bowel trouble caused by improper 
feeding. If you will give us data 
as to feeding and care we will be 
very glad to help you in every way 
possible. We are especially glad to 



/ 




i 



Again Far in the Lead — Away Ahead 



Here is the correct answer to your incubator problems. The growth and develop- 
ment of the poultry business calls for larger plans, larger units, for hatching pur- 
poses. The Old Reliable — the standard of all incubators, now presents a grouping; 
sectional system that in every way ranks first. It is far removed from the experi- 
mental stage. It embraces all the well known principles of the Old Reliable, the 
result of 42 years study and effort to reach perfection and produce incubators in style 
and form to meet the public's demand. The original fundamental principles have 
never been deviated from. The growth and expansion, and all that adds to ease of 
operation, convenience and economy, as well as efficiency, have been carefully safe- 
guarded in every change we have made. 

The Old Reliable Standard Mammoth 

Is made in both hot air and hot water styles, in sections of 1,100 egg capacity. These sections 
may be used in singles, doubles or three-high. You cannot afford to ignore questions of 
responsibility and reliability when selecting yonr equipment. The constant flow of testimonials 
from satisfied customers is our warrant for the belief that we are offering you the best incu- 
bator equipment possible to produce. 

The Reliable Sales book contains complete information of our full line of incubators: likewise a 
complete line of poultry equipment and accessories. We can furnish everything necessary for 
operating the largest or the smallest poultry plant. Everything we make or sell is supported 
fcy a positive money back guarantee. 

Write for catalog and dealer terms and prices. 

RELIABLE INCUBATOR & BROODER CO., Box 15, QUINCY, ILL. 



P. 

i 




Raymond Benson 



help beginners because we realize 
how handicapped they are in the bus- 
iness. Drop us another line. 

Mating Problem 

Will you please tell me in the next POULTRY 
KEEPER if it is alright to mate March puUets 
with a May rooster. I have White Leghorns. 

Mrs. B. K., Oregon. 

We prefer two year old hens as 
breeders but if pullets must be used 
we rather have a two year old male 
to head the pen. We might mate 
them as you suggest but certainly 
not from the same pen, even though 
they were hatched at different times. 
We advocate out crossing as beins; 
the greatest aid in keeping up the 
vigor of the flock. 



They Are Not 

Do you consider the White Leghorn a good 
market fowl? A. B. C. Illinois. 

We would not class them but of 
course there is much in knowing how 
to get them in good condition. Some 
markets now cut the price on Leg- 
horns and all small breeds and while 
this is unfair yet it shows that the 
breeders have got to get busy and 
furnish a better market fowl or loose 
their market. We have given atten- 
tion to egg production and now we 
must look to the meat side of the 
problem. 



Rhode Island Red Bantams 

I have been thinking some of trying to pro- 
duce a Rhode Island Red Bantam but want to 
know first if there are anv bred now. 

J. I. J., Ohio. 

The Rhode Island Bantam has 
been bred in a small sort of a way 
for some years. I believe that they 
were bred in Oberlin in your state 
the first that I heard of them but 
for some reason they have never be- 
come very popular. They can be 
produced and with proper advertis- 
ing would become quite extensively 
bred. 



Chicks Shed Feathers 

I have some White Leghorn chicks which are 
shedding their feathers. Every morning th° 
floor is covered. My Brown Leghorns do not 
shed that way. What causes this and a rem- 
edy? S. P. S., Missouri. 

All chicks shed or molt to a more 
or less extent. Unless the amount 
of feathers was excessive we would 
not be alarmed at all but should 
they become naked we would change 
the ration. No doubt a ration which 
is too stimulating has been used or 
perhaps too much feather forming 
material is contained in the ration. 
Do you give the chicks plenty of 
green food? 



Several Questions 

1. Are White Wyandottes good layers.? 

2. Are thev as good as the other Wyan- 
dottes? 

3. How much per pound will they bring on 
the market? 

4. Do they need free range? 

5. Are they better than the Rhode Island 

Reds? 

O.Do you think they would do well in Min- 
nesota?' M. P.. Minnesota. 

1. If you get a laying strain they 
make excellent records but it is the 
same as with every other breed, you 
must know what strain you are buy- 
ing. 

2. The Whites have been more 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 7 



extensively bred and are fully as 
good in every way as any of the oth- 
er 'Dottes. We would not say they 
are any better. This' is speaking in 
a general way and having no partic- 
ular strain in mind. 

3. That depends on the price be- 
ing paid at time of delivery. The 
only way you could determine what 
they would bring would be to get 
the price of your market which will 
change often. 

4. No more so than any of the 
Standard breeds. 

5. We would not say so. It is 
difficult to compare two breeds as 
both have their good and bad points. 

6. Yes. 



Still More Questions 

1. Why are thicks hatched in incubators 
smaller than those hatched under hens? 

2. Will incubators hatch goose, turkey and 
duck eggs equally as well as hens eggs? 

3. My turkeys are eight weeks old and I 
feed them one pint of curd mixed with one 
pound of sand to 13 turkeys three times a day. 
I also feed ground corn meal about twice a 
weelc. They have free range but they die. 
What is the cause? 

4. To 45 ducks nine weeks old I feed five 
quarts of bran mixed with half pint of sand 
and a pint of mill gTound corn meal and yet 
there are a number of small ones who don't 
seem to grow and die off. What must I do 
for this? 

5. What must I do for chiggers on my lit- 
tle Chicles? 

G. My goslings are nine weeks old but they 
v^try from one pound to three pounds. Why 
do they vary so in size? 

Miss 0. M.. Missouri. 

1. Your statement is not a fact. 
Chicks hatched in incubators are ful- 
ly as large as those hatched under 
hens, all things being equal. Much 
depends on the parent stock and the 
way the machine is run. 

2. Yes. Follow the instructions 
which come with machine. 

3. Improper feeding causes this. 
We suggest that you buy the book 
"Turkeys: Their Care and Manage- 
ment" and study it with care. You 
can get this book of POULTRY 
KEEPER for 75c. 

4. Here again your ration is sad- 
ly incomplete. 

5. A two per cent ointment of 
creolin and lard will help. You 
might dip them if fairly well grown 
using ten quarts of water of about 
100 degrees and add six ounces of 
creolin and mix well. Use when 
cool as a dip. 

6. Improper ration will cause 
this. 



Vent Gleet 

I have a male which has an inflamation of 
the vent with a whitish discharge with bad 
ft of disinfection and let its have it in 
POULTRY KEEPER? I am sure many readers 



would be grateful for it as they must he for 
the many good ideas which you have passed 
on to us in the past. Thank you. 

E. T., Illinois. 

In an early issue you will find 
just such an article as we have pre- 



pared one during the summer 
months. We are glad to have this 
subject brought up as it is a highly 
important one. 

(Continued on page 11) 



Page Number 8 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 





per HEN 
Official 
NET PROFIT! 

This is the exact record of 
the Ferris Pen at New Jersey 
Egg Contest. Double your 
profits with the White Leg- 
horns that are making history 
at such National Egg Contests 
as Illinois, Ark., Neb., Calif., Texas, Conn.. Mich., 
etc. Get the benefit of 22 years breeding for eggs. 

TRAP NESTED — PEDIGREED 

Guaranteed by the world's largest Leghorn 
farms. Over 25,000 satisfied customers. Sat- 
isfaction or your money back. Free instruction by our 
14 White Leghorn specialists assures your success. 

LAYING HENS 

Thousands of 
yearling hens from 
our choicest matings 
can now be spared 

at lowest prices in years. 

MATURE 

COCKERELS 

Get your breeding 
cockerels now. You 
can save nearly half 
and get first choice 

of thousands of our fin- 
est pedigreed cockerels. 

JUNE PULLETS 

Will lay in Nov. or 
Dec. and pay for 
themselves before 
spring. Our fall sale 
means a saving of 
40 per cent to you. 
Write for prices. 



LAYING PULLETS 

Make sure of a big 
winter egg-yield. 
Bargain prices on 
thousands of the fin- 
est ever raised. 

YEARLING MALES 

Now selling the 
males that have 
headed our best 
pens. Astonishing 
bargains on males 

that were not for sale at 
any price last spring. 

EGGS and CHICKS 

Big discounts on 
orders placed now 
for shipment next 
spring. We can also 
ship fall eggs and 
chicks fro m our 
southern farm. 



REE GET THIS CATALOG 

A Post Card brings it— 
FREE. Get our special 
low prices. Increase 
your income. Make 
sure of a big winter 
egg-yield. Write today. 

GEO. B. FERRIS 

909 Union Ave. Grand Rapids, Mich. 




Ask for 
Free Booklet 
on Vaccination . 




For the Prevention and Treatment of 
Roup, Chicken Pox, Diphtheria, Canker, etc. 

.S.L. AVIAN MIXED 
BACTERIN uitfa 

S2.00, 2S0 doses. SS.OO, 500 loses 57. SO. 
Svringe »r>d Nttalts. $1.50. 

American Scientific Laboratories, Inc. 

U7 West Kinzie St. Dept. 1-23 Chicago, UL 



Poultry Leg Bands 



Colored Leader, Adjustable, fit 

anything from bantam to goose, 
numbered consecutively, 5 colors: 
Red, Blue, Green, Yellow, Pink. 
100, $1.50; 50, $1.00; 25, 60c. 

Heavy Aluminum, numbered con- 
secutively, large raised figures, mil- 
lions sold, adjustable, will stay on. 
100, 60c; 50, 35c; 25, 20c. 

Celluloid Spiral, 5 colors, 
Red, Blue, Green, Pink, Yellow; 
••an be easily distinguished. 

12 25 50 100 250 500 

No. 1 Asiatics $.25 .45 ».75 $1 20 $2.75 $5.00 

No. 2 Rocks, Reds. etc. .20 .40 .60 1.00 2.25 4.00 
No. 3 Leghorns, etc. . . .20 .35 .50 .90 2.00 3.50 

Prices are postpaid. State color and breed. 
Eureka Supply House, Box K, Mt. Morris, III. 





INTENSIVE POULTRY KEEPING 
By F. Raymond Benson 

(Continued from page 3) 

wards this end and as a result be- 
comes an expert along this one line 
and success comes. 

Another feature which it is well 
to consider is that with the inten- 
sive plant the exposure to the ele- 
ments is reduced to a minimum and 
this is well worth thinking about if 
one is none too strong physically. It 
is very important that the fowls re- 
ceive proper care winter and sum- 
mer, during storms and in sunshine 
and the intensive plant allows one 
to give this attention to his fowls 
without becoming wet and cold and 
withal disagreeable. The poultry- 
man should be willing to suffer from 
storms in order to care for his flock 
but many take up poultry keeping to 
gain back their health and to those 
who are delicate the rigors of winter 
must be avoided as much as possible. 

Many times a man would be glad 
to take up the keeping of poultry 
but it would take his wife away from 
her social and society life in the 
city and his children would not have 
the opportunity for school or recre- 
ations, not to mention the wish of 
the man to be near his lodge or 
church. With the intensive plan one 
can locate so close to the city or in 
fact within the city and need not 
deprive his family or himself of any 
of these privileges. Today we think 
much of our social life and it takes 
a lot of grit to throw this ali to the 
winds and move intp the _. country. 
Perhaps it might be as well for us 
if we did not give so much attention 
to this side of our lives but the fact 
remains that we as a nation are 
growing into it rather than away 
from it and facts are stuborn things. 
We know of a mayor of a city of 
moderate size who felt that his 
health demanded that he retire from 
politics and go into the poultry bus- 
iness. What did he do but build a 
modern intensive plant right in the 
heart of his city and to this day he 
can be seen working about his poul- 
try yards and it goes without saying 
that he found much pleasure and 
health in so doing. His family have 
been able to carry on their social 
life as of old. 

These, then are a few of the ad- 
vantages but for fear that some of 
our readers may become over en- 
thusiastic and jump into the game, 
let us briefly touch on a few of the 
disadvantages so that we may know 
both sides of the question. 

One of the chief disadvantages is 
the high cost of feed under this plan. 
Every kernel must be purchased that 





To produce vapor-bath sprouts with their diastase, grape sugar, and vita- 
mines that bring the eggs; to cut down feed bill and run up egg yield; 
| AS? 1 4 f .1«.IHWPW£!I j to change 1 bu. grain into 2 to 3 bu. egg-producing green feed; g«-t a 

wo t r: n bath"SPR0UTER 

Makes your dry lots profitable in summer and brings the eggs all 
winter. We are the originators of the Grain Sprouter and'make all 
kinds and sizes from a few hens to 1,000. Free circular on "Sprouted 
Oats and Eggs." Ask for catalog on Incubators, Brooder Stoves, 
Brooders, Feeders, etc. 

CLOSE-TO-NATURE COMPANY 
20 Front Street Colfax, Iowa 



is fed to the fowls. Nothing is raised 
and the fowls being confined to 
small quarters do not have 'the op- 
portunity to range and obtain any 
food in this way. The cost of feed- 
ing a hen is greatly higher than 
when the hen is on free range. In 
like manner the cost of labor in car- 
ing for them is higher. When the 
fowls have ample run one can use 
large hoppers and all kinds of feed- 
ing devices and we know poultrymen 
who had schemes of feeding that 
would enable them to make but one 
visit to the coops each day with food 
and water. Intensive poultry keep- 
ing increases the cost of labor and 
really this should be figured in just 
as if you hired a man. You may do 
the work yourself but the labor 
should be charged up to the business 
just the same. 

Another feature which means 
quite a bit to anyone whose working 
capital is limited, is the risk you 
take in going into one feature of the 
game. Suppose for example that you 
were in the commercial egg business 
and the bottom was knocked out of 
prices as it was the past spring. It 
would hit you pretty hard. The man 
who has several sources of income 
would have the best of you in such 
an event. But on the other hand 
when eggs go to a dollar a dozen 
you have the best of the argument. 
You should so plan it to get as many 
eggs as possible during the highest 
price period and when they go down 
you need not worry for you have 
made your profit. 

(Continued next month) 



HAWK SET 



Guaranteed to catch all hawks 
that are taking your poultry or 
your money returned. Price GOc. Anthony 
Henak, Oxford Junction, Iowa. 



LIGHT AND DARK RRAHMAS 

Show birds and choice breeders in old 
and young stock for sale reasonable. 

MILLER POULTRY FARMS 
Lancaster, - - Mo. 



Get Prices on Old Trusty 
Incubators and Brooders. 

Nearly a million in use. Quick 
shipment. Low prices. Free 
catalog to any address on re- 
quest. M.M.JOHNSON CO. 
Clay Center, Nebraska 




Shipment | Freight 



KILLS MITES IN HEN-HOUSES 



ARROW 



^-Appli 
^ONCE 



e d 
E A 

GARBOUNEUM S^gg 

Guaranteed and highly recom- 
mended. Write for Circulars. 
C&rbolineum Wood PreservingCo. 
Dept. 154 Milwaukee, Wis. 




Free-ConAeys Poultry Book 



30 pages chock full of information about the feeding and 
rearing of chicks, culling of hens, etc. Tells how to keep 
chickens healthy and how to make them pay. Whether 
a beginner or a professional, Conkey's Book is worth 
dollars to yon. Sent for 6 cents in stamps to paypostage. 
THE C. E. CONKEY CO. 6542 BroarJwaj, Cleveland, atrio 



Quality Chicks 



W T From best laying strains, 12 

I I r\ varieties. Breeding stock hens 
* ,v ' r* ¥1.50 up. Cocks and cockerels. 

Free 32-page catalog and reduced price list. 
Missouri Poultry Farms, Columbia, Mo. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 9 



ILLINOIS EGG LAYING CONTEST 

The report of Mr. C. P. Scott, Chief of the Department of Poultry Hus- 
bandry on the Illinois Egg Laying Contest for June as follows 
Five Highest Pens in the Mediterranean Class 





Owner 


Address 


Variety 


Eggs 


-1 

1. 


George B. Ferris 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


White Leghorns 


116 


2. 


Northland Farms 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 




91 


3. 


E. D. Lewis 


Jackson, Mich. 




90 


o 
6. 


Harold Barclay 


Wheaton, 111 




90 


6. 


Sweet Briar Farm 


Ontarioville, 111. 


Anconas 


90 


4. 


ti. hj. Heine 


Lakewood, N. J. 


White Leghorns 


89 


5. 


Funk Egg Farm 


Bloomington, 111. 




88 




Five Highest 


Pens in the American English Classes 






Owner 


Address 


Variety 


Eggs 


1. 


M. W. Klemm 


Lincoln, 111. 


Barred Rocks 


76 


o 
L. 


F. W. Boulware 


Hatton, Mo. 




7 4 


o 
L. 


Fernside Farm 


Foxboro, Mass 


S. C. Reds 


1 A 

i 4 


o 
o. 


Kent Poultry Farm 


Cazenovia, N. Y. 


Barred Rocks 


7 6 


o 
o. 


Mrs. F. M. Robinson 


Metamora, 111. 


S. C. Reds 


1 6 


4. 


E. G. Horner 


Quincy, 111. 




C ft 

bit 


tr 
0. 


Geo. W. Pratt 


Cropsey, 111. 


Barred Rocks 


a o 
DO 


tr 
0. 


C. P. Scott 


Peoria, 111. 
AT MURPHYSBORO 


S. C. Reds 


c o 
06 




Five Highest Pens in the Mediterranean Class 






Owner 


Address 


Variety 


TP rv rv f. 

-CjggS 


1. 


Ward L. Hull 


Roodhouse, 111. 


White Leghorns 




2. 


Wm. E. Clarke 


Mt. Vernon, 111. 




107 


o 
o. 


F. A. Millard 


Kingsville, Mo. 




1 ft o 


4. 


E. T. Fox 


Watseka, 111. 




ft ft 

9 9 


r 
0. 


Egyptian Poultry Farm 


DuBois, 111. 




ft A 

94 




Five Highest Pens in the American English Classes 






Owner 


Address 


Variety 


Ji'goS 


1. 


Geo. W. Pratt 


Cropsey, 111. 


Barred Rocks 


95 


2. 


Kenneth Pautler 


Murphysboro, 111. 


S. C. Reds 


94 


q 


C. Braxton 


Galesburg, 111. 


W. Wyandottes 


88 


4. 


Mrs.M. R. Walters 


Areola, 111. 


Barred Rocks 


86 


5. 


Shaw's Pharmacy 


Murphysboro, 111. 




85 


5. 


George Niebruegge 


Valmeyer, 111. 


White Rocks 


85 


5. 


John Swain 


Belleville, 111. 


White Wyandottes 


85 



QUINCY CONTEST 

The standing of the five highest pens and the five highest individuals 
at the Quincy Contest will be of interest to our readers. The years contest 
is fast drawing to a close and the final winners will be reported soon. 

Highest Pens, Mediterranean Class 
1. Geo. B. Ferris, Grand Rapids, Mich., 872 eggs. 2. Harold Barclay, 
Wheaton, 111., 766 eggs. 3. S. C. Price, Hazelton, Pa., 754 eggs. 4. John 
J. Nyenhuis, Hudsonville, Mich., 72 6 eggs. 5. Geo. Ghost ley, Anoka, Minn. 
720 eggs. 

Highest Individuals to date are: 1. Harold Barclay, Band No. 187, 191 
eggs. 2. Geo. B. Ferris, Grand Rapids, Band No. 419, 190 eggs. 2. John 
J. Nyenhuis, Band No. 57, 190 eggs. 3. A. E. Davidson, Mt. Sterling, 111., 
Band No. 205, 189 eggs. 3 E. D. Lewis, Jackson, Mich., Band No. 143, 189 
eggs. 4. C. G. Ream, Lancaster, Pa, Band No. 10, 182 eggs. 5. Northland 
Leghorn Farm, Grand Rapids, Mich., Band No. 14, 179 eggs. 

Highest Pens American and English Classes 

1. Kent Poultry Farm, Cazenovia, N. Y., Barred Rocks, 733 eggs. 2. 
A. B. Blevins, Litchfield, 111., Minorcas, 682 eggs. 3. Mrs. F. W. Robinson, 
Metamora, 111., S. C. Reds, 632 eggs. 4. Frank Pifer, Sullivan, 111., W. Wyan- 
dottes, 631 eggs. 5. Lawrence Rasmussen, Highland, 111., W. Wyandottes, 
561 eggs. 

Highest Individuals to date: 1. Kent Poultry Farm, Band No. 452, 170 
eggs. 2. C. P. Scott, S. C. Reds, Band No. 288, 167 eggs. 3. Kent Poultry 
Farm, Band No 451, 166 eggs. 4. Frank Pifer, Band No. 81, 15 6 eggs 5. 
F. W. Boulware, Hatton, Mo., Barred Rocks, Band No. 552, 152 eggs. 



For Use, 
On Your Poultry J 

Seize the hen and dust Instant 
Louse Killer into the feathers. 
The handy sifting top can 
makes it convenient to use. 
Sprinkle it in the nests, on the 
roosts and floors. Put Instant 
Louse Killer in the dust bath 
occasionally — your hens v/ill 
do the rest. This means 
louse prevention. 

FOR STOCK 

With one hand stroke the hair 
the wrong way, with the other 
sift in the Louse Killer. 
Especially good for lousy colts. 

GUARANTEED. The dealer 
will refund your money if it 
does not do as claimed. 

1 lb., 25c; 2»/ 2 lbs., 50c 
( Except in the far West and Canada ) 

Dr. HESS & CLARK 
Ashland Ohio 




8 to 12 
WEEK OLD 



PULLETS 

from heavy laying Hogan tested stock. Rocks, 
ttcds, Wyandottes and Leghorns at new low 
prices. WECKEL BEOS., Box 391K, Molina, 111. 



* Poultry Leg Bands 

rajOIIIII THE "BEST YET" ALUMINUM. 

I'M Not colored. Will stay on. 12.20c: 
WJjlPal^llll' 25. 30c; 50. 60c; 100. 90c. Stat* 
breed. 

CELLULOID SPIRAL BANDS. 
Red, Green, Amber, Pink, Black. 
White. Yellow. Purple. Light Blue. 
Dark Blue. Ruby, Cerise. 

Size/or 12 25 50 100 250 500 

Baby Chicks, Pigeons.. $.10 S.20 $.35 f .60 $1.25 $2.25 

Crowing Chicks 15 30. .40 .75 1.75 3.00 

Leghorns. Anconas . . .20 .35 .50 .90 2.00 3.50 

Hocks. Reds. etc. ... .20 .40 .60 1.00 2.25 4.00 

Asiatics 25 .45 .75 1.20 2.75 5.00 

Turkeys. Geese. . . . .30 .50 .85 1.40 3.25 6.00 
Aluminum Marker Work*. Dept. 13 Beaver Falls. Pa. 




PROFITABLE CULLING AND SELECTIVE 
FLOCK BREEDING 



One-fourth to one-half of the hens In the 
overage flock are non producers, or practically 
so, for six months in the year. These "slacker" 
hens eat up the profits faster than the good 
layers in the flock can earn them. If you 
keep poultry for profit, whether you have a 
commercial or backyard flock, you cannot af- 
ford to feed these idle hens. Get rid of them 
by adopting simple, easily applied culling 
methods. 

"Profitable Culling" describes every known 
method of selecting layers that is of recognized 
value. You can readily follow the plan and 
easily understood descriptions in this book, 
which are fully illustrated with several dozen 
black-and-white and three-color photographic re- 
productions of live, plucked and dissected good 
iayers, non-layers, and poor producers. By prop- 
er culling you can secure largest profits and 
protect your feed bin and bank account by 
keeping the egg production of your flock up to 
or about fifty per cent yield throughout the 
laying year or season — in fact until early Sep- 
tember. 

Size of book Is 9x12 inches. It contains 120 
pages with atractive Sewell art cover; is printed 
on super-calendered half-tone book paper and 
profusely illustrated. Compiled at a cost of 
more than $4,000. Price postpaid, $1.50. Ad- 
dress Poultry Keeper, Quincy, Illinois. 



LADY PURITAS 




PURITAS SPRINGS 
S. C. W. LEGHORNS 

The World's Greatest Layers 



Lady Layer 

Leid 326 Efefea /~v 
On: / A 




Trapnested for over 10 years without missing 
one day. Every nest on our farm is a trapnest. 
We trapnest every day of every year. 

Reduced Prices 

ON 8 TO 12 WEEKS OLD PULLETS, COCKERELS AND BREEDING STOCK 

Puritas Springs Leghorns are world wonders. They shell out eggs regardless of weather condi- 
tions. They are also beautiful birds. The large white eggs they lay bring highest market 
prices. Thousands of our customers will have no other strain of Leghorns; after trying other 
strains they found Puritas Springs Leghorns always lay the most eggs in winter as well as 
summer. The demand was so great this year that we were forced to refuse hundreds of orders 
for hatching eggs and baby chicks. If you once have Puritas Springs Leghorns you will want 
no others; you'll be the proud owner of the world's very best. Send for reduced Price List 
and mention if you have our large free instructive catalog. We are fair and square and guar- 
antee satisfaction in every way. We have hundreds of letters to prove it. 

Puritas Springs Poultry Farm, Box Pill, Avon Lake, Ohio S^U^r 



Page Number 10 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 




SUPER SOL-HOT 
Heater for Canopy 
Brooders and 
Incubators-. 

► The Only 
Heater with 
Positive Oil Control 

The Super Sol-Hot is the only heater on the mar- 
ket with a positive oil control—it maintains a con- 
stant oil level— it's automatic — burns even flame alt 
the time. Acquaint yourself with the Super Sol-Hot 
before next season. Write now for free descriptive 
folder. We'll alsosend vou folder telling all about my 

MULTI-DEK 

Sectional Incubator 

The Multi-dek "add a section as you need it" idea 
."■ust exactly fits in with the average poultry raisers' 
requirements, 250 to 3000 egg capacity, furnished 
complete, ready to set up, or you can build it your- 
self from set of plans we furnish free. A big winner. 
Write for free folder. 




H. M. SHEER CO. 

Dept. 28 QUINGY, ILL 




i Powerful, Belia 
ble. Built to last; 
do hard, heavy 
work. Big Burplu3 
power. Use cheapest 
fad. 3 Month's Trial, Easy Terms. 
Ee^t to start; no cranking. Mo3t practi- 
cal engine ever built. 10-year guarantee. 
ENGINE BOOK FREE— Write today. 
OTTAWA MANUFACTURING CO. 
721-0 King St., Ottawa. Kansas. 



Gasoline 
Engine Prices 

2 H-P.S33.30 
2 .H-P. 45.57 
3HiH-P. 59.50 
4 H-P. 75 95 

5.7.10.12.1o.22 
HP& All Ker- 
osene Engines 
at Proportion- 
ally Low Prices 



S. G. White, Brown and Buff 
LE6B0BN PULLETS 
$1.00 Each 

Yearling hens. Cock birds. We have 
over 10,000 head of High Class 
stock. Catalogue. 25 Standard va- 
rieties. 

The South Kenton Poultry Farm, 
Kenton, Ohio 

Chas. W. Wyllie, Supt. Geo. W. Cox, Prop. 



TIMELY TOPICS 

Readers are asked to co-operate in making this Department 
interesting by sending in suitable items to, F. Raymond 
Benson, 915 Augusta Ave., Elgin, Illinois. 



The International Rose Comb 
White Minorca Club has reorganized 
and is planning a new feature. The 
secretary is L. L. Reed, Middleport, 
Ohio, and every breeder would do 
well to get in touch with him. 

The Annual meeting of the Rhode 
Island Red Club of America will be 
held in Denver, Colorado, January 
16, 1923. All Red breeders should 
make a note of this and attend if 
possible. This club is growing all 
the time and shows what can be done 
when everyone pulls together. 

We understand that Canada has 
reduced the duty on incubators and 
brooders going into that country to 
1 5 per cent. If this is the case it 
should stimulate business among our 
brothers to the north and help them 
get an even better start in poultry. 
Let us do all we can to give them 
a lift for as a matter of fact our 
interests are the same. 

The Jersey Black Giant Club held 
an open air meeting at Crosswicks, 
New Jersey, on July 11th and accord- 
ing to reports they had a regular 
meeting. This club is wide awake 
and boosting 365 days a year. 

Melvin F. Uphoff, Secretary of 
the National Golden Wyandotte Club 
will judge the Goldens at the New 
York State Fair and this is a guar- 
antee that it will take quality to win. 

Dr. O. B. Kent, who was formerly 
with the poultry department of Cor- 
nell University has accepted a posi- 
tion as director of the Poultry De- 
partment of the Quaker Oats Com- 
pany. We wish Dr. Kent every suc- 
cess in his new position. 

The First Western District Meet 
of the Silver Laced Wyandotte Club 
of America will be held at Des 
Moines December 6-10. 

White Hill Farms, Little Blue, 
Missouri, has been incorporated for 
$150,000. Wm. Shands has built up 
this business and has been elected 
president of the new corporation. 
This is another proof that there is 
money in the poultry business. 



Stormont's Barred Rocks Bring Home the Bacon, Note! 

In National Illinois Eg-g Laying Contest, my strain of Barred Rocks made the following 
winnings: Grand Champion Pen, Majority 200 eggs; Grand Champion Layer, 27!) eggs in 
eleven months, Third Highest Layer and Fifth Highest Layer. Sly pen was recognized with the 
following prizes: 28 Certificates of Award, 15 Ribbons, 7 Silver Cups and .$2.s.0O in cash. This 
greatest of all BARRED ROCK RECORD made over 100 pens and 500 layers all breeds com- 
peting. Mr. A. D.Smith, Sec. of Contest said: "I DO NOT HESITATE TO RECOMMEND 
YOUR BIRDS IN CONTEST AS EXCEPTIONALLY HEAVY LAYERS. THEIR RECORD IN 
THE CONTEST SHOULD BE SUFFICIENT EVIDENCE TO SATISFY ANYONE." I am book- 
ing orders for cockerels of this same blood for Oct. delivery- Write for circular and prices. 



REV. A. C. STORMONT, 



R. F. D 



WARRENSBI RG, MO. 



(Formerly of Auxvasse, Mo) 



The Interstate Fair Association is 
erecting a new building at Lynch- 
burg, Virginia, which will be 100 by 
50 feet. This will help greatly in 
giving poultry a better opportunity 
and no doubt poultrymen will ap- 
preciate it and show their gratitude 
by bringing more birds. 

C. A. Finsterbusch of Santiago, 
Chile, has started the first poultry 
paper in the country under the title 
of "Chile Avicola." We have no 
doubt but that this paper will prove 
of great worth in this fertile field 
and we regret our inability to fol- 
low its progress as ye editor only 
reads good old U. S. A. 



FEED MOULTING HENS 
DICKINSONS 

GLOBE EGG MASH 

Help them molt evenly and quickly. 
Your Dealer Can Supply You. 



SUPERIOR LEG BANDS 




Aluminum 


Spiral • 


Sure 


Clinch 


Celluloid 


12 - 


S .15 


12 - $ .15 


25 - 


.25 


25 - .30 


50 - 


.35 


50 - .50 


100 - 


.65 


10O - .95 


250 - 


1.50 


250 - 2.00 


500 - 


2.50 


500 - 3.25 



Also, colored number bands. Baby 
chick bauds. State breed and sex. Postpaid. Cat. free: 
AURORA BAND C0.79LaSalle St., AURORA, ILL 



$4Q95 Buys 140-Egg Champion 

|Q Belle City Incub ator 

Hot- Water.Copper Tank, Double Walls 
Fibre Board, Self Regulated. (JAqc 
S7.9S_bu7s 140-Chick Hot-*IU^ 





Water Brooder. Or both for only 

Express Prepaid 1 '©var , 

East of Rockies and l9»1.00fll 
allowed to points West. Usara 
Guaranteed. Order now. Shara 
In my $1 .OOO in Prizes, or write 
forFree Book "HatchincFacta." 
It tells everything. Jim Rohan, Prea, 

QeHeCity Incubator Co., boj 145 Racine, Wis. 



LEG BANDS 

All guaranteed-Any tiie n 

A I.IIMINUM BANDS r 
with raised figures, z 
price postpaid, 10-lBc, <5 
25-25C. B0-35C, 100-60C. 
ECONOMY colored 

celluloid with 





aluminum back. 
Any color, two large black num- 
bers In each band, prices 12-SOc 
25-oOc, 60-80C. 100-11.50. 
Makers of 25 different styles of 

of LEG * WING bands. 
The National Poultry Band Co. 
Send for catalog. Newport, Ky. 



$1.00 This Ad Worth $1.00 

Prepaid Gratis, in TJ. S., Our NEW $1.00 

Safety Chemical Windshield Swipe 

The Modern, Safety, Windshield Cleaner. 

SRfg ONE 75c Pkg. EG-0-M0L 

By U2 Years TJnparalelled Achievement, MOST 
Effective Poultry Compound World Has Known. 
Enclose this ad' with 75c ($1.00 outside TJ. S. 
money back it' returned) for above and Dry 
Mash' Formulaes that lower Feed Costs and in- 
creases Poultry Profits. Rural Agents Wanted. 

FARM CHEMICAL CO., Dunkirk, Ind., U.S.A. 

Makers "TUE IMPS" Products 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 11 



Pat Smith of Quincy, Illinois, is to 
act as assistant superintendent of 
the Coliseum Show in Chicago the 
coming winter. Don't forget the 
date is December 5-10. Plan to at- 
tend and enter a few birds if you can. 

W. R. Schrader for some time Sup- 
erintendent of the Greater St. Louis 
Poultry Show has passed on to his 
reword. This will be sad news to 
his many friends. 

* * * 

The large hatchery located at 
Cushing, Nebraska, owned by Mrs. 
Paul Anderson has been destroyed 
by fire. The loss is estimated better 
than $25,000 with only $7,000 in- 
surance. We have not learned Mrs. 
Anderson's plans but trust she will 
resume business again. 

* * 5i: 

Out in Iowa the other day they 
sent a man down for four years for 
stealing chickens. This will be good 
news to our readers and perhaps we 
will hear more of it in the future. 
If more were sentenced for chicken 
stealing there would be few roosts 
raided. 

* * *' 

The Texas State Fair will be held 
October 6-15 this fall and we under- 
stand that the awards are quite lib- 
eral. 

* * :j: 

The Oklahoma State Fair is to be 
held September 23 to Oct. 1, They 
have -a new poultry building there 
anci are justly proud of it. 

* * * 

How about trying "Kilamite" and 
starting the fall right? 

Mr. Charles V. Keller of Winmac, 
Indiana, has been quite ill but is re- 
ported at this writing to be on the 
road to recovery Mr. Keeler has 
many friends who will wish him 
rapid progress to health again. 

Mr. G. M. DeMent has launched 
the "Southern Poultry Journal" up- 
on the rough seas of poult it journal- 
ism. The South is a rich field and 
we wish the newcomer every success. 



Remember the Illinois State Fair 
is September 16 to 23 and reserve 
time to give it the once over. 

Out in Petaluma, California, they 
have a regular Egg Day Carnival 
once a year. They have a chicken 
parade, an egg scramble, egg bar- 
becue, egg games and rooster races. 
They also elect an Egg Day Queen. 
The Petaluma Chamber of Commerce 
is back of this and it has proven a 
great help to the poultry industry. 

The Greater St. Louis Coliseum 
Show will be held December 2 8 to 
January 1. 'Tis going to be some 
show" boys. 

Over in Australia they hold poul- 
try shows that would make Link Orr 
gasp. The Royal Centenary Show 
has .11,000 exhibits and 100 judges. 
How's that? 

The editor is always glad to re- 
ceive items which will prove useful 
for this department. 



NEW SPECKLED SUSSEX CLUB 



A new Club has been formed to 
be known as the National Speckled 
Sussex Club with the following of- 
ficers: President, E. R. Fields, Sand- 
wich, 111.; Vice president, W. J. 
Smith, New Hampton, Iowa; Secre- 
tary ,-treasurer, E. H. Hoffman, La 
Crosse, Wis. Directors, Mrs. C. L. 
Constable, Goodland, Ind.; H. L. 
Bradford, Bailey, Tenn.; C. E. Lewis, 
Wells, Vt. This club has been or- 
ganized to promote the breeding and 
exhibiting of this variety and all 
breeders of Speckled Sussex are in- 
vited to join and write the secretary. 

RHODE ISLAND BEDS 



By D. E. Hale 



Experience breeders and beginners alike will 
find the information contained In this Instruc- 
tive and beautiful Illustrated book worth many 
times the price. Learn from it how to select 
and mate birds for the breeding pen, how to 
feed, judge and exhibit successfully. 

Fully Illustrated, including a fine color plate 
by Sewell, 88 pages. 9 by 12 Inches. Price 75c, 
postpaid. Address Poultry Keeper, Quincy, 111. 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

(Continued from page 7) 



Purple Comb 

I have a good rooster that gets a purple 
comb about every week. He looks well and 
eats and drinks but I know this comb isn't 
right but being a beginner I don't know what 
to do. H. L. L., Minnesota. 

This is nothing serious but might 
lead to trouble unless you attend to 
it. Separate the fowl from the bal- 
ance of the flock and give one half 
teaspoonful of Epson salts in water. 
Feed lightly and be sure to give more 
green food in the ration hereafter. 
Charcoal should be kept before the 
flock at all times. 



Broken Shank 

I had a valuable cock break his shank a 
short time ago and wish- you would give me 
suggestions as to treatment that 1 may know 
better what do do next time such a thing oc- 
curs. D. S., Indiana. 

Perhaps a few splints and set 
broken bones and bind with cotton. 
Then wrap well and sew with thread. 
We sometimes have used auto tire 
tape over the bandage during damp 
weather. Feed well and keep .fowl 
quiet for about two weeks when 
bandage may be removed. Keep 
bowels active with castor oil or 
Epsom salts. 



Get More Eggs 
— Save Feed 

A New Book FREE to Poultiy Rais- 
ers. 96 pages, Fully Illus- 
trated 



This splendid book, "DOLLARS 
AND SENSE IN THE POULTRY 
BUSINESS" was compiled under the 
personal supervision of Prof. T. E, 
Quisenberry, who is intimately 
known throughout the Poultry In- 
dustry as one of America's Foremost 
Poultry Authorities and Experts in 
Poultry Culture. He is the origina- 
tor of simple, easy-to-follow methods 
that have been applied by thousands 
and thousands with astounding suc- 
cess. 

No matter how much experience 
you have had — or how little you may 
know, you can use the secrets out- 
lined to remarkable and profitable 
advantage. And you can master 
these secrets during spare time. Join 
the 4 6,000 in the United States, Can- 
ada and 20 Foreign Lands who are 
applying the "Quisenberry Way" day 
after day, every month in the year 
regardless of conditions. 




Don't Kill the Laying Hen! 

Do you know how to select the good layers 
and how to cull out non-producers ? Do you 
know how to save feed? The Quisenberry 
Method of Culling is fully outlined in the book 
referred to in this announcement — and it is 
FREE. 

Remember, every plan outlined in this book 
is practical and easy to apply. There are no 
theories — no fanciful ideas — no "freak stunts." 
There is'nt a single method outlined that is 
not worth a lot of real money to you. 

■SEND AT ONCE: You need the information 
given in this valuable book — and you need it 
NOW. Don't delay getting this book into your 
hands and knowing all about the simple prac- 
tical methods outlined that axe positively 
guaranteed to turn failure into success; elimi- 
nate loss and piles up biggest profits; Every 
poultry raiser should write immediately for a 
copy of this Free Boole. Address T. E. Quisen- 
berrv. Dean American Poultry School, Dept. 
+013, Kansas City, Mo. 




REG U'3 CM OFF 

THE GUARANTEE ROUP CURE 

! 'CA\^0 Sy0tl was discovered on our breeding estate, where we breed J^T.- - 
" registered Holstein Cattle, Spahr's Giant Epochal Berk- 

shire Hogs, and our world's famous NONESUCH, f^^-g}] 
FERRIS WHITE 300-egg strain leghorns. After los- 
ing several thousand dollars worth of our valuable , 
birds, we were determined to discover a cure for Roup, 
Colds- Canker, DiDtheria, and Chicken-pox. AVE POSI- 
TIVELY GUARANTEE "SMOKE EM," to effect a complete 
cure or every cent of your money back. Read what a nation- 
al known breeder has to say about "SMOKE EM." "We 
carry 5,000 chickens on the farm. In one small house that contained 150 pullets the 
roup broke out. We removed 40 pullets that I would have gladly given to anyone who 
would have taken them off the farm. We used one can of "SMOKE EM," three smok- 
ings and strange to say it cured all of the forty head. You have a wonderful roup 
cure." The Hencackle Farm, Per J. R. M. Boyd, Cumberland, Md. Write or wire us for 
particulars. Dealers: We have a good proposition for you. 

THE H. M. SPAHR BREEDING ESTATE, Dept. 12B Thiumont, Maryland 




HEN 



Page Nmmbei- 12 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



(000-Egg Queens 




(52) 

The experience of a great many users of 
large Queen Incubators shows that it is more 
profitable and satisfactory to build up large hatch- 
ing capacity by the use of 1000-egg Queens than 
by installing one large unit. It makes it much 
less expensive to start in business, and you can 
add to capacity gradually as desired. Cost of in- 
stallation and operation is less by the Queen 
method . The Queens may be stacked in three tiers, 
the two upper rows being equipped with stub legs. 

Larger Hatches 

Hatching with 1000-egg Queens also results in 
larger hatches, as proven by records. Queens are 
wonderful hatchers — we have sold as many as 
275 of these large Queens to one poultryman. 
Queen Air Release Tube is a feature not found in other 
machines. It makes it impossible for air pockets to form 
in the tank, insures uniform heating and provides ideal 
hot water vapor heat. There are many other advantages 
■which we shall be glad to explain to anyone interested. 
Write us about your needs. Queen Incubators are made 
in size from 70-egg to 1000-egg capacity. Catalog sent free. 

QUEEN INCUBATOR COMPANY, Lincoln, Nebraska 



KITSELMAN FENCE. 



"Saved at Least 
40 Per Cent," 

Writes F.Marks. Green Lawn 
Poultry Farm, Wauseon, O. 
Cut your own fence costs 
to the bone by buying direct 
\ from us at Lowest Factory Prices. 
We Pay the Freight. 
' Write today for Free 100-page Catalog of 
Farm, Poultry and Lawn Fence, Barbed 
WirefG-ates, Posts, -and latest low prices. 
KITSELMAN BROS. Dept 229 MUNCIE IND. 
America's Oldest Fence Manufacturers. 




Another 

Sig drop in fence prices — 
freight prepaid. Write 
for new 1922 cut price 
catalog, showing big 
price cuts on 150 styles 
of famous Brown quality 
Double Galvanized fence, 
roofing and paints. Also barga; 
gates, steel posts, etc. 

THE BROWN FENCE & WIRE 

D«pt. 57 CCI«»»l»nd. OMo 



Oat Sprouter $2.49 

For $2.49, Including heater, you can make the 
test oat sprouter on earth. Plans for building, 10c 
I. PUTNAM, Eoute 924-0, ELMIRA, N. Y. 





HARMLESS BUT POWERFUL 

Is "OCULUM." the Egg maker . It 
routs disease, makes bigger birds, and 
lots of eggs. This Journal O. K's it. 
Sample and Booklet, 10c Bottles 50e 
and $1.00. 

GUARANTEED 

The "OCULUM" Co., Box S. 
Salem, - - Va. 



FOLLOW NATURE— FEED 
PLENTY OF SPROUTED 
OATS 



The Best Green Feed 



After many years of close study, 
poultry breeders in all parts of the 
country have come to the conclusion 
that nothing contributes more to in- 
crease the egg yield and put the birds 
in good condition than a plentiful 
supply of sweet, tender blades of 
grass or succulent food. 

Did you ever notice how eagerly 
the young grass is devoured by the 
fowls, young and old, during the 
spring months, when the grass is of 
the finest quality and how quickly 
the egg yield increases? Many peo- 
ple heretofore believed and no doubt 
many do yet, that this increase in 
the number of eggs laid is principal- 
ly due to warmer weather, while in 
fact the green food thus supplied by 
nature in addition to the ration given 
by the breeder is entirely responsi- 
ble for it. 

The nearest we can come to imi- 
tate nature in this respect after the 
fall supply is exhausted is in sup- 
plying sprouted grain, especially in 
form of oats, which can be. so easily 
and cheaply produced in a modern 
sprouter. 

Observations during past seasons 
with sprouted grain in hot weather 
when the grass is tough and fibrous 
shows that too little attention is of- 
ten given to succulents in the ration. 
Of course, one cannot do without 
grain or its by-products, especially 
animal protein, but one can waste a 
lot of money feeding grain alone 
without succulents in the ration. 

If a considerable portion of the 
grain fed during hot weather is giv- 
en in a sprouted form to growing 
stock they mature much quicker and 
at less expense. .The older birds pass 
through the moult more quickly and 
in better condition when kept sup- 
plied with an ample quantity of suc- 
culent sprouted grain. The result 
is that the hens come back into lay- 
ing condition earlier in the winter 
and lay more consistently through 
the cold winter months. — M. C. 



POULTRY HOUSES AND FIXTURES 



Complete, New, Down to Date 



This book goes right to the bottom of the 
subject of poultry house construction. It tells 
how to plan houses In order to save lumber. 
What grades to buy and how to buy to good 
advantage. There Is not an Important detail, 
from locating the house to painting the complet- 
ed building, that is not fully and clearly treated. 
Plans and bills of materials are given for houses 
to meet every practical need. Also tells how 
to equip the house with labor-saving conven- 
iences. 

Size of book, 8% by 12 Inches, 112 pages, 
printed on supercalendered book paper, with 
235 helpful illustrations. Price $1.00 postpaid. 
Address Poultry Keeper, Quincy, Illinois. 



f AI TTTfifV* Any Bone Cutter claimed to be MANN'S without F. W. MANN CO. cast on 
» * i^Jl^. jts surface, is an imitation. The genuine MANN'S is made onlj in Milford. 

Make Your Hens Lay 

You can douuk- your ep:g yield bv feediupr fresh-cut. raw bone. It *f / 




egg yield by feeding fresh-cut. raw bone. It 
contains over lour times as much e^g-making materialas irrain and 
takes tue place of bugs and wo-ms in fowls diet. That's why 
gives more egps. greater fertility, stronger chicks, larger fowls. 

MANN'S !£> T D E E S L T BONE CUTTER 

cuts easily anl rapidly all large ana small bones with adhering 1 
meat and gristle. Automatically adapts to yor.r strength. Never 
10 Days 1 Free Trial. Uomoney down. P^nd for our free books today. 

F. W. tAAHH CO. Box 57 MILFORD, MASS 




Cured Her 

Rheumatism 

Knowing from terrible experience the 
suffering caused by rheumatism, Mrs. J. 
E. Hurst, who lives at 508 E. Olive St., 
13223, Bloomington, HI., is so thankful at 
having cured herself that out of pure 
gratitude she is anxious to tell all other 
sufferers just how to get rid of their tor- 
ture by a simple way at home. 

Sirs. Hurst has nothing to sell. Merely 
cut out this notice, mail it to her with 
your own name and address, and she 
will gladly send you this valuable infor- 
mation entirely free. Write her at once 
before you forget. 



Cured His Rupture 

I was badly ruptured while lifting a trunk 
several years ago. Doctors said my only hope 
of cure was an operation. Trusses did me no 
good. Finally I got hold of something that 
quickly and completely cured me. Years have 
passed and the rupture has never returned, 
although I am doing hard work as a carpenter. 
There was no operation, no lost time, no trouble. 
I have nothing to sell, but will give full infor- 
mation about now you may find a complete 
cure without operation, if you write to me. 
Eugene M. Pullen, Carpenter, 1G-J, Marcellus 
Avenue, Manasquan, N. J. Better cut out this 
notice and show it to any others who are rup 
tured — you may save a life or at least stop 
the misery of rupture and the worry and danger 
of an operation. 




Egge Brings More Eggs 

When eggs 
are selling at from 
60 cents to 51.00 a 
dozen, is when you 
make the most 
money. Nothing so 
helpful as Egge. It 
is a marvelous egg- 
builder, helps to 
keep the fowls in 
perfect health and 
solves the problem 
of making hens lay 
in cold weather. 

EGGE IS COM- 
POSED OF: Egg 

and shell forming 
materials, kidney, 
liver and bowel reg- 
ulators, blood solvent 
and purifiers, appe- 
tizers and feed as- 
similators. It con- 
tains medicinal in- 
gredients that stim- 
ulate the whole di- 

gestive tract from crop through gizzard to 
ovaries, shell forming organs and circulation. 

READ THE EXPERIENCES OF OTHERS 

Mrs. Carrie Powell, "Please send me 12 
packages of your poultry remedy. Everyone 
that uses it likes it, and my neighbors say that 
they would not be without it. They do not 
have any trouble getting eggs when feeding 
your remedy." 

Mrs. A. J. Whitlook, When I began using 
Egge my chickens were badly afflicted 
with roup, and I was only getting six and eight 
eggs per day. Now I am getting eighteen and 
twenty eggs per day, and my chickens are 
healthy and thrifty. 

Miss Mary Robinson, "Enclosed is a $4.00 
P. O. order for Egge. I can fully say that I 
am more than pleased with the good results 
from my 200 hens in the laying qualities. 

Wm. Geers, says, "I have used Egge and 
find same a great remedy for poultry, not only 
as a health producer, but It is also very valu- 
able in winter time for hens. While feeding 
your remedy, I got more eggs than I ever did 
before." 

J. H. Kohlmeyer, says: "Egge has no equal. 
The cost is practically nothing compared with 
the results I got, and I cannot recommend It 
too highly." 

EGGE SAVES SICK CHICKENS 

You see from testimonials and contents, Egge 
is not alone an egg tonic but contains ingredi- 
ents that make it a remedy for relieving cholera, 
roup, canker, limberneck, gapes, pip, etc. Send 
for a package today. It will help your hens 
through the molt and get them to laying again. 
PRICES — Large Package 50c; 25 lb. Pail, $5.00. 
All prepaid, money back if it fails. 

AMERICAN SUPPLY CO. 
Dept. P. K. Quincy, III. 



When writing advertisers please mention 
this paper. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 13 



Reliable Mammoth Incubator 




To think of a Mammoth Incubator 
is to immediately associate the 
achievement with J. W. Myers, Pres- 
ident of the Reliable Incubator & 
Brooder Company of Quincy, Illinois. 
You would no more fail to do this 
than you would fail to associate the 
discovery of lightning with Franklin, 
the discovery of the law of gravity 
with Newton, or the discovery of 
America with Columbus. Mammoth 
Incubators and J. W. Myers are in- 
separable. 

The construction of the Mammoth 
embodies all the underlaying princi- 
ples subject to service, durability, ef- 
fiency and it is scientifically econ- 
omical. The Mammoth is well 
packed and insulated between the 
double wood walls to prevent the loss 
of a single egg, no matter how se- 
verely the atmospheric changes may 
prove to be during the period of 
hatching. These changes cannot 
penetrate the egg chamber. The 
build of the Mammoth is identical 
with the smaller Standard Reliable. 
An advantage of the Mammoth is 
the additional partition in the center, 
dividing it into two sections, each 
having an independent and separate 
regulating device and heater. It po- 
sesses the same double heating and 
ventilating system which has made 
the Reliable Standard Incubator 
THE WORLD'S GREATEST 
HATCHER. The construction is 
suCh that the maximum egg capacity 



is secured with the minimum oil con- 
sumption. The heater is encased in 
the end of the machine, and utilizes 
all the heat given off and none 
wasted, thereby enabling users to 
operate the Mammoth on a third to 
one half less oil than used by any 
other incubator of like size. 

The best way to measure the use- 
fulness of a Mammoth is to try one 
and in that way you may easily trace 
the history of the egg from the nest 
to the bank. Almost anyone can cut 
prices, but Mr. Myers believes in 
producing a better article for the 
money, this takes brains and the ac- 
curacy of the rule is herewith dem- 
onstrated. Only through the suc- 
cess of satisfied customers does J. W. 
Myers, President of the Reliable In- 
cubator and Brooder Co., of Quincy, 
Illinois, claim any success of his 
own. 



TURKEYS: THEIR CARE AND MANAGEMENT 

Some of the most successful breeders and com- 
mercial growers in the country tell of the 
methods by which they have accomplished their 
successes, and what they have done others also 
can do. If you raise turkeys in any number, 
this book will be worth many times its price 
to you. 

Beautifully illustrated, one color plate, 96 
pages. 9 by 12 inches. Price 75c postpaid. 
Address Poultry Keeper. Quincy, Illinois. 



MAKE UP A CLUB 



Make up a club of your own, choosing the 
papers or magazines you want to take. Write 
and let me quote a special cut price. I can 
save you considerable money on your subscrip- 
tions. A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, Illinois. 



1000 Eggs 

in Every Hen 

New System of Poultry Keeping — 
Get Dollar A Dozen Eggs — Fa- 
mous Poultryman 

TELLS HOW 



"The great, trouble with the poultry business 
has always been that the laying life of a hen 
was too short," says Henry Trafford, Inter- 
national Poultry Expert and Breeder, for nearly 
eighteen years Editor of Poultry Success. 

The average pullet lays 150 eggs. If kept the 
second year, she may lay 100 more. Then she 
goes to market. Yet, it has been scientifically 
established that every pullet is born or hatched 
with over one thousand minute egg germs in 
her system — and will lay them on a highly 
profitable basis over a period of four to six 
years' time if given proper care. 

How to work to get 1,000 eggs from every 
hen; how to get pullets laying early; how to 
make the old hens lay like pullets; how to 
keep up heavy egg production all through 
cold winter months when eggs are highest- 
triple^ egg production; make slacker hens hus- 
tle; $5.00 profit from every hen in six winter 
months. These and many other money making 
poultry secrets are contained in Mr. Traffords 
"1,000 EGG HEN" system of poultry raising, 
one copy of which will be sent absolutely free 
to any reader of this paper who keeps six hens 
or more. Eggs should go to a dollar or more 
a dozen this winter. This means big profit 
to the poultry keeper who gets the eggs. Mr 
Trafford tells how, if you keep chickens and 
want them to make money for you, cut out 
this ad and send it with your name and ad- 
dress to Henry Trafford, Suite 1090P, Herald 
Bldg., Binghamton, N. Y., and a free copy of 
"THE 1,000 EGG HEN" will be sent by re- 
turn mail. 



h KNOWN FROM 
jfl COAST TO COAST 
"iM C.P.SCOTT 

PEORIA. ILL 
ROUTE "7 ,BOX 



D 



Barred Rock 

Baby Chicks 

And All Other Standard Varieties. 

I make a specialty of Barred Rock chicks and 
I can guarantee my customers that they will 
be more than satisfied if they order chli from 
me, as I keep nothing but the choicest of 
birds in my flocks, and they are culled each 
year for high egg production. Every customer 
ordering from me must be satisfied or money 
will be cheerfully refunded. Barred Rock 
chicks $16.50 per hundred. 

FRED YTJNKER, Dakota, Illinois 




JOHN 1 S. MARTIN, 



REGALS — "The Ideal Fowl" 

Regal Dorcas White Wyandottes have stood the test and may rightly be named the All-purpose 
fowl. They are splendid layers of large brown eggs and have made wonderful records in the Official 
Laying Contests. They are a superb table fowl and mature much sooner than most other strains. 
Canadian winters are severe but the Regals thrive and keep right on laying with the mercury 20 to 
30 below. I raise, as a rule, between one and two thousand January and February chicks with prac- 
tically no losses. 

As an Exhibition fowl the Regals lead all others. Xo strain has a greater record of winnings. 
.My unoroken record of fifteen victories at the New York State Fair has not been equaled by any other 
strain. 

I 

WHY SEEK FL'RTHER? If you are thinking about starting in the Poultry Business your success 
or failure will largely depend on your choice of a breed. If you are already breeding White Wyan- 
dottes and are not satisfied witli your flock, give the Regals a trial. They have made money for me 
and they will do the same for you. Book your order at once to make sure of delivery when you 
want them. 

200 Acres Devoted to White Wyandottes. Free — Send for 20 Page Catalog and Summer Sale List, 
giving description of over 1,000 breeders that I am offering for sale. 



Box 408 



PORT DOA ER, ONT., CAN*. 



Page Number 14 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



This 



SAMPLE 

Hakes 2 

Pip and Disinfectant^ 



We want you to try this new and better Coal 
Tar Disinfectant— the only one made in solid 
form— 

CoMegb NOX 

Solidified Disinfectant 

Just dissolve one little cube of Conkey's 
Nox in a gallon of warm water and you have 
a gallon of Disinfecting Solution all ready 
for use. You pay nothing for bottles, barrels 
or cans; pay no freight on heavy liquid; you 
have no leaking or breaking. 

Destroys Lice, Mites, Ticks 

In combating poultry mites and similar uses, 
Conkey's Nox is undoubtedly the most efficient 
coal tar preparation known to science at the 
present time. It should be used constantly for 
cleansing and disinfecting coops, nests, roosts, 
incubators, brooders, fountains, etc. 
Use Conkey's Nox once and you will prefer it 
to any other form of Disinfectant, Extermina- 
tor or Germicide. Send 10c, coin or stamps, 
for sample package containing 2 cubes, for 
making 2 gallons. Circular free. 

THE C. E. CONK EY CO. 
6542 Broadway Cleveland, Ohio 

| THE G. E. CONK EY CO. 

I 6542 Broadway, Cleveland, Ohio 

| Enclosed find 10 cents. Send me postpaid sample of 

| Conkey's NOX for 2 gallons of Disinfectant. ' 

| Name M ; > 

| Address _ 



STORMOXT MOVES 



Rev. A. C. Storm.ont, owner of 
pen 53 Barred Plymouth Rocks 
which won the championship at the 
Illinois Egg Laying Contest last year 
has moved from Auxvasse, Missouri, 
to Warrensburg, Missouri, as you 
will see from his ad elsewhere in 
this issue. In regard to moving Rev. 
Stormont writes: "I am moving to 
Warrensburg, Mo., where I have pur- 
chased a five acre tract just inside 
the city limits. The winning in Ill- 
inois Contest, and the returns from 
my ad in the POULTRY KEEPER 




REV. A. C. STORMOXT 



has made my business so big that I 
must seek larger quarters. I cc-uid 
not begin to fill the orders that your 
paper brought last spring for eggs 
and stock. I shipped into most every 
state. I am now booking orders for 
cockerels to be delivered in October. 
I have a wonderful lot of cockerels, 
running over with the same blood 
that made the great record in- the 
Illinois Contest." 



SPLENDID NEW POULTRY I5« K 
FREE 

Would you like to get a splendid 
64 page poultry book full of informa- 
tion' and advice on the best breads, 
houses, incubation, brooding, dis- 
eases and how to avoid them, how 
to feed hens to keep them in bept 
condition and sustain heavy egg pro- 
duction, how to feed and raise most 
chicks from every hatch and get the 
book free of charge. You can get 
this splendid book of 64 pages abso- 
lutely free of charge by writing -the 
American Milling Company, Dept. 15, 
Peoria, Illinois, giving them the 
name of your feed dealer and men- 
tioning this paper. • It is full of 
ful information and will interest 
you. 



FOE THOSE WHO CAN USE HAMMEB AND 
SAW 



Built and Used by Poultrymen 



Is a »fi-page book; paper bound: contains 108 
Illustrations, fully describing various styles it 
poultry houses for the large farm, as well as 
the back yard. Poultry house equipment, In- 
cluding roosts; trapnests, food boxes and hop- 
pers; drinking founts; fences, both permanent 
and movable; metal fence posts; brooders both 
tireless and heated; broodcoops; covered chick 
yards; poultry catchers, the popular stove-pipe 
hopper, and many othe useful appliances that 
can be made at home and money saved. Fir 
the man who enjoyes making his own poultry 
appliances, building his own coops, houses, etc 
this book Is of especial value. Labor-saving and 
money-saving devices are fully explained and 
Illustrated so that the man who can use a ham- 
mer and saw can make any of them. Price SO 
cents. Address Poultry Keeper, Qulncy, Illinois 



SUCCESSFUL BACK-YAED POULTEY 
KEEPING 



A new one just off the press. Tells every- 
thing you need to know about poultry keening 
on a small scale to insure success. The largest, 
most complete and down-to-date book on~tl>o 
subject ever published. Will turn failure into 
success and is an invaluable guide to anv be- 
ginner. 

Every person who is keeping fowls on a 
small scale or is planning to do so — everyone 
who wants to learn about the latest practical 
methods adapted to back-yard conditions — will 
want this big, truly helpful book. Every im- 
portant phase of the subject is covered in the 
seventeen chapters contained within its pages, 
from the laying out of the plant to the use of 
artificial illumination — the new method that 
positively doubles and more than doubles fall 
and winter production. Whether you are in- 
terested in poultry keeping simply' to produce 
a supply of eggs for home use or as a money- 
making side line, you need this practical dowti- 
to-date book. 

".Successful Back-Tard Poultry Keeping" 
contains 104 pages. 8'^ by 12 inches, over 100 
illustrations and a beautiful three-color art cover 
by Schilling. Price SI. 00. postpaid. Address. 
Poultry Keeper, Quincy, Illinois. 



THE 0BPINGT0N 



By J. H. Drevenstedt 



This book meets the need of authentic Infor- 
mation regarding the breeding of these birds. 
It gives full Instructions on selecting breeders, 
matin? for best results, general care, feeding 
and management. There are speeial articles no 
each of the different varieties. Indespensable to 
all Orpington breeders who want to pn duce the 
best. 

Well Illustrated, 80 pases, 9 by 13 inches 
Price 75c. postpaid. Address Poultry Keeper 
Qulncy. Illinois. . 



CAPON 



WHAT'S n A DrMVT AND 

WHY? 



A book that explains why Capons are the most profitable part of the poultry business and everything 
vou will ever want to know about CAPONS. 50 pictures from life that show each step in the 
operation. List of Capon Dealers' addresses. Tells how to prevent "Slips." where to get the 
best and cheapest capon tools. Capons are immense eating. Big profits realized. Get wise. This 
book tells how. Copyrighted new and revised edition. Regular 50c copy, prepaid to your address 
(a short time only) for a Dime in coin or stamps. 

GE0EGE BEUOY, E. E. 17, CEDAE VALE, KANSAS. 



HORNER'S PEDIGREED S. C. REDS 

We are now ready to furnish you with blue ribbon cockerels 

and pullets for early show. 
ERNEST G. HORNER, R. 7, Box 30, QUINCY. ILL. 




XOGiKP^ " a Hatch 



September Chicks Make Winter Meat and March Layers 

We pay the postage, guarantee 95 per cent live arrival 
and send FEED FREE with each order. 

40 breeds of chicks, 4 breeds of ducklings. Select and Exhibition 
grades. Pound size chicks. April and May pullets and mature breeders at 
rigiut prices. Catalogue free, stamps appreciated. 

NABOB HATCHERIES, 

DEPT. 16. GAMRIER, OHIO 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 15 



70% Water 



Heavy Drinkers Are Heavy Layers; 

Water is a natural tonic just as important as 
feed. Get full value from lush priced feeds. 
Increase esg production and profits by keeping 
warm water before your hens all the time. 

Eureka no^Ss Fountain 

KEEPS WATER WARM 24 HOURS 

No lamp, no fire, no danger. Nd upkeep. No 
trouble. Only up-to-date Sanitary Fountain. 

Drinking cup does not project beyond outer can. 
No possible chance to catch litter or filth. No 
contamination. Water always warm, clean and 
pure. Made of heavy galvanized iron. Built 
like fireless cooker. Works like thermos bottle. 
Simply till every evening with hot water— that's 
all. Hens will have plenty of pure, clean, warm 
water early in the morning just when they want 
it and need it most. 

Made in Three 
Sizes, as Follows: 

2 gallon size, 15 Vz 
ins. high; 13 ins. di- 
ameter; 15 lbs. weight. 

each . . $3.50 

3 gallon size, 18 ins. 
high; 14 ins. diame- 
ter; 20 lbs. weight. 

2S- $4.00 

5 gallon size, 22 Ins. 
high; 15 ins. diame- 
ter; 30 lbs, weight. 

each . . $5.00 

MONEY BACK TRIAL OFFER — Order direct 
from this ad today. The "Eureka is a necessity 
—a year round fountain. Keeps warm water 
warm in winter and cold water cool in summer. 
Last years thousands of satisfied users. Money 
back if not absolutely satisfied. Order today — 

EUREKA SUPPLY HOUSE 

3 Wesley Avenue Mount Morris, Illinois 




THE PLYMOUTH BOCKS 



By William C, Denny 



This complete breed book explains standard 
requirements and tells how to select, mate and 
exhibit winners In all varieties. Subjects of 
special Importance to Plymouth Rock breeders, 
such as how to get correct barring In Barred 
Bocks, "Stay-white" plumage In White Bocks, 
correct, uniform color In Buffs, double mating, 
line breeding, strain building, etc., all are 
plainly and fully treated. 

Well Illustrated, including three color plates, 
244 pages, 9 by 12 inches. Price $1.00 postpaid, 
.address Poultry Keeper, Qulncy, Illinois. 



MAKE UP A CLUB 



Make np a club of your own, choosing the 
papers or magazines you want to take. Write 
and let me quote a special cut price. I can 
nave you considerable money on your subscrip- 
tions. A. Otis Arnold, Qulncy, Illinois. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

The classified advertisers In POULT BY 
KlfilCPIOR are coining money fast this year. 
!( pays to keep your announcement before 
I lie people. That Is the way to establish 
a reputation for your business. Why not 
go after the people, get good prices, and 
make more money thlB year? 

BATES 

Rates for Ads. Classified under proper 
Headings are as follows: 

1 month 6c per wor* 

2 months _ 11c per word 

3 months 16c per word 

4 months 20c per word 

1 year - 50c per word 



ANCONAS 



E. C. ANCONA COCKERELS— Early hatched 
—cheap. Mrs. E. J. Crawford, Owatonna, Minn. 



BABY CHICKS 



BABY CHICKS — Half Million for 1922. Twelve 
leading pure breeds from heavy egg producing 
strains. Alive delivery guaranteed. Catalog. 
Binlll) Brothers Hatcheries, Mexico, Mo. 1-9 



| BREEDER'S CARDS | 

o — o 

BANTAMS 

BANTAMS AND EGGS— 22 Varieties . 2c stamp 
for circular. Fenn Bantam Yards, (Desk 77). 
UclllVHII. Wis. 

BBAHMAS 

LIGHT BRAHMAS : — Hens one year old $4.00 
each: two year old, $3.00: Cocks $5.00. Anna 
B. Corwin; 'it. F. D. Xo. 3, Newburgli, N. Y. 



LIGHT BRAHMA HATCHING EGGS— $1.50 per 
lf> prepaid. Mrs. A. Burehell, Rossmoyne, Ohio. 

LIGHT BRAHMAS— Cavey Farm, Blkhorn, Wis 

12-12 

DOGS 

RABBIT HOUNDS. FOXHOUNDS, COON, 

opossum, Skunk, Squirrel. Wolf, Groundhog 
dogs, Setters. Airedales. Circular 10c. Brown's 
Kennels, York Pa. 7-6 

DUCKS AND GEESE 

PURE WILD MALLARD AND COLORED MUS- 

covey Ducks for sale. Oliver H. Ridgeway, 
Oxford. Maryland. 

FOR SALE— THOROUGHBRED TOULOUSE 

Breeding Geese at .$4.00 and $3.00 each: also 
Mammoth Pekin Breeding Ducks at $2.50 and 
$8.50 each. G. Bruenn, Durand, Wisconsin. 



FERRETS 



FERRETS FOR SALE— BROWN OR WHITE, 

large or small, either sex;, only the best stock. 
W. A. Peck. New London, Ohio. 9-4 



LEGHORNS 



500 SINGLE COMB WHITE AND BROWN 

Leghorn 1 year hens, cockerels and pullets. 
A. Schi'oeder, St. Peter, III. 



WHITE LEGHORNS 



FOR SALE— CHOICE S. C. WHITE LEGHORN 

cockerels, hatched from bred to lay, trap- 
nested stock, at $4.00 each. G. Bruenn, Dur- 
and, Wisconsin. 

BARRON S. C. W LEGHORN PULLETS, 

.$1.00 each. 15 weeks old, extra large. Also 
few Northland Farms cockerels. Same age. 
Same price. Fred Bawden, Keokuk, Iowa. 



S. C. WHITE LEGHORN COCKERELS FOR 

Sale — 12 weeks old, $1.50: 16 weeks old, $2.00; 
200 weeks old, $2.50, of D. W. Young and 
Barron strains. Robert Thompson, Walnut 
Grove, Minn. 



PULLETS — 75c each and up; Chicks, $10; Eggs, 
$6; Hens, $1.50 each, Pedigreed Cockerels, $3 
to $5 each. Others, $1 each; Cock Birds, $5 
each. Imported Barron and Young strains S. 
C. White Leghorns, raised separately. No hen 
under 248-egg record in six years breeding. Trap 
Nested, Pedigreed. Reduced prices. Circular. 
Brownstown Poultry Farm, Brownstown, Ind. 



BBOWN LEGH0BNS 



SINGLE COMB BROWN LEGHORN COCKER- 

els one dollar each, 14 weeks old. Forest Lock, 
Borden, Indiana. 

S. C. DARK BBOWN LEGHOBNS— Eggs only. 
6c each delivered. Willis Fairbanks, Mora, 
Minn. 

W. W. KULP, BOX 30, POTTSTOWN, PA.— 

The leaders in size and contest winners. Cata- 
log. Both combs. 

BUFF LEGHOBNS 

BUSINESS BEAUTY BUFF LEGHORNS— High 
record layers, large eggs. This year breeders 
$24.00 per dozen. Joseph Benedict, Chevy 
Chase, Md. 

BLACK MINORCAS 

SINGLE COMB BLACK MINORCAS — Early 
hatched pullets, Cockerels. Also few breeders 
winter layers. Table Egg Farm, Lookout, Penn. 



BLUE ORPINGTONS 



LOOK — Royal Blue Orpingtons. Winners. John 
Unangst, 1214 Prairie Ave., Freeport, Dl. S-12 



BUFF ORPINGTONS 



SINGLE COMB BUFF ORPINGTON COCKER- 

els. February hatched. Also several good 
yearling pens. Walter Goessling, 930 Jeffer- 
son, St., Quincy, 111. 



O — O 

| BREEDER'S CARDS | 

o o 

PIGEONS 

OFFER— mated Homers, $2.00 pair. Beautl- 
White Homers, $3.00 pair. Get my prices 
on Runts, Carneaux, Maltese Hens. Free book- 
let, Squab Mannual 50c. Charles B. Gilbert, 
2210 Almond St., Philadelphia, Pa. 10-6 

RHODE ISLAND BEDS 

VIGOROUS COCKERELS FROM REDS THAT 

lav! Rose comb. Prices reasonable. Circular. 
Albert Bernhardt, Mt. Healthy. Ohio. 

ROSE COMB BED EGGS— From prize winners 
and record layers. (Bean strain.) Mating list. 
Daugherty'g Poultry Farm. Metcalf, 111. 3-2 

WHITE BOCKS 

SNYDER'S WHITE PLYMOUTH BOCKS— Stock 
for sale. Eggs, $2.00 per setting. A. E. Sny- 
der, Dellwood Poultry Yards, Dellwood, N. Y. 



BARRED ROCKS 



"CACKLERS" ..ARE PUREBRED BREDTO- 

Lay Barred Rocks. Trapnested by Geo. W. 
Pratt, Cropsey, 111. Bargain prices on either 
young or old stock. Unrelated pens. Write 
wants plainly. Circular free. 

PARKS BOCKS— Eggs that will hatch. Cata- 
log. W. W. Kulp, Box 30, Pottstown, Pa. 

MY VICTORY STRAIN OF BARBED ROCKS— 

Won at Toledo, O., Nov. 29th to Dec. 4th, 1921. 
3, 4, 5, Ex Cock; 2 Ex Cockerel; 1, 2, Ex Hen; 
3 Ex Pullet; 1, 2, Pullet Bred Cock; 2 Cock- 
erel Bred Pen; Silver Medal for Best Display. 
Barred Rock Club shape and color specials. 
Send for photo of my winning birds. J. T. 
French, 838 West Grove Place, Toledo, Ohio. 

SEVERAL VARIETIES 

WHITE WYANDOTTE HENS— Two cocks ami 
fine young cockerels. Pair New Zeland Bed 
Rabbits. Homer and Oameaux Pigeons. Lew 
H. Stewart, Route 4, Sioux City. Iowa. 

APRIL HATCHED PULLETS OR COCKERELS 

— From Parks pedigreed stock direct. Also 
(Woods) Light Brahmas, $2 each: $22 dozen. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Eva Bojar, St. Be- 
nard, Ohio. 8-3 

SHEPPARD S. C. ANCONA AND PENNSYL- 

vania S. C. W. Leghorn eggs for hatching, 
$2.50 per 15. H. E. Ritter, Middleburg, Pa. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES 

WHITE WYANDOTTE COCKERELS AND 

Pullets for sale. Bred 16 years for show anil 
heavy egg production. Robert Fetrow, Etters, 
Pa. 

COCKERELS — Buy them now, from blue ribbon 
White Wvandottes, $2.50: three for $7.00. W. 
J. Puderer, 518 E. C. St., Belleville. 111. 

AGENTS 

AGENTS — Sell guaranteed egg producing poul- 
try tonic, money back agreement, agents pro- 
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Products, 29 Times Plaza, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

POULTRY SHOW 



MADISON SQUARE GARDEN SHOW— Buyer's 
Guide (list of exhibitors) free. Official Marked 
Catalog 75 cents. Both books very valuable. 
Send for them. Address D. Lincoln Orr, Sec'y. 
Box 23, Orr's Mills — Cornwall, N. Y. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

FOR SALE — Check protector, adding machine, 
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PRINTING 



BETTER POULTRY PRINTING— Prepaid every- 
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cards, envelopes noteheads. tags, labels, $1.00 
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special bargain sheet for stamp only. Model 
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THE 




POULTRY KEEPER 



A JOURNAL FOR EVERY ONE INTERESTED 
IN MAKING POULTRY PAY DEVOTED PARTIC- 
ULARLY TO PRACTICAL POULTRY KEEPING 






Try the New Way to Kill Lice and Mites 

Little red mites are doing much damage. They suck the very life out of hens. 

A hen worried to death with Lice and Mites cannot lay if she wants to. But 
she eats just the same. It is a dead loss ito keep lousy chickens and allow them 
to consume high priced feed. Don't do t. Use 

KILAMITE 



(KILLS RED MITES) 



KILAMITE leaves the bottle in powerful, evap- 
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Where the odor of KILAMITE is found. It is 
like "Poison Gas" to insects, mites, chiggers, 
roaches, bed bugs, ants, etc. Once a bottle 



broke in transit and the man handling it 
thought from the odor it was "Poison Gas." 
When he read the label he said insects certainly 
could not live where that odor prevailed. It is 
not poisonous to human beings, animals, or 
fowls or anything that breathes through lungs. 
It is "Poison Gas" to all insects that do not 
have lungs but which secure their oxygen by 
the passage of air through pores in the body. 
They can not stand the odor of it for a minute. 



HOW TO USE KILAMITE 

In order to prove effective sprinkle a few drops of KILAMITE in the 
nests, on the roosts or anywhere about the hen house, and HANG 
THE UNCORKED BOTTLE SOMEWHERE WITHIN THE BUILD- 
ING. The powerful evaporating vapors which leave the bottle pene- 
trate everywhere. The presence of this odor in your hen house will 
mean that it will be free of Lice and Mites. 
It will go farther if you mix it with a little 
kerosene. It is well known that kerosene is 
somewhat effective against lice but does not 
kill red mites. Mix a little KILAMITE with 
it and it becomes deadly for mites and lice. 
By doing this the use of KILAMITE becomes 
a most economical and effective method of 
putting an end to your lice and mite troubles. 
We have sold thousands of bottles and have 
satisfied customers throughout the world. 
Many people buy it by the gallon so as to 
have it always on hand. 




Chicken Mile. Hll.d With the Life Bleed, 
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All prepaid. 

Money back if it fails 



American Supply Company 

Dept. K. QUINCY, ILLINOIS 



TOUR DEALER 



THE 




A JOURNAL FOR 
EVERYONE 
INTERESTED 



KEEPER 



IN MAKING 
POULTRY 
PAY 



Vol. XXXIX 



OCTOBER, 1922 



No. 7 



Raising Chickens vs. Poultry Culture 

By D WIGHT E. HALE 



This is the first of a series of Six 
Articles that will appear in Poultry 
Keeper from the pen of Judge Hale. 
Any one of these articles will be 
well worth the price of a year's sub- 
scription. Do not let your subscrip- 
tion expire and you might get your 
friend and neighbor to subscribe 
and get this valuable series. — Edi- 
tor, 



We have often asked, and been 
asked the question, "where does 
raising chickens leave off and poul- 
try culture begin. The word "cul- 
ture" means to cultivate and culti- 
vate, according to Webster, means, 
"to bestow care and labor upon, with 
a view to ultimate returns." There- 
fore, in order to appreciate modern 
poultry culture, the great improve- 
ments that have been made, and the 
improvements that can and ought 
to be made, let us investigate some 
of the methods in vogue by those 
wlho just "keep chickens." 

The fact that some people still 
"keep chickens" instead of applying 
the up-to-date methods of poultry 
culture, was brought to mind at one 
of our recent state fairs. We write 
a great many advertisements and 
realize that advertising is scientific, 
mail-order salesmanship. Therefore, 
we like to know the kind of people 
we must make our advertisements 
■talk to and we also like to know the 
class of people that read the articles. 
Being thus interested we stood in 
the poultry building watching one 
of the subscription agents at work. 
A rartJher rural looking gentleman 
came along and was accosted with 
the usual question: "do you keep 
chickens?" "Nay," replied the far- 
mer, "they's a bunch running 'round 
the place. They set themselves, 
raise themselves, roost in the trees 
and on the machinery, eat 'round ith' 
grain stacks, and when we want one 
to eat we just go out and shoot it." 
This case, while seemingly exagger- 
ated, is not uncommon on many 
farms.but as this class of farmer does 
not subscribe for poultry papers or 



attend farmers institutes, there lis no 
use in our discussing him here. 

There is another class of farmer, 
however, who reads poultry papers, 
farm papers, daily papers, attends 
farmers institutes, — who will have 
nothing but pure-bred hogs, cattle, 
horses sheep or dogs on his farm, but 
he tolerates the chickens merely for 
the women's sake. He wants the 
best of stock, follows the stock mar- 
ket reports, reads up on breeding, 
stock, silos and cribs for his grain, 
but he forces the fowls to seek the 
shelter of the machine shed or barn, 
and then abuses them liberally for 
dirtying the harness and machinery. 
The poor birds are forced to hunt for 
their feed around the grain stacks, 
cribs and mangers, and to drink the 
filth of the barnyard pools. When 
we see such conditions, see how the 
fowls exist by right of hustling and 
the survival of the fittest, we cease 
to wonder at the vitality and stamina 
of the much abused barn yard scrub. 

When a nest of eggs is found un- 
der the barn, in the hay loft, under 
the feed box in the manger or else- 
wihere, the eggs are carried in tri- 
umph to the house where the women 
folks place them in a pan on the 
top shelf in the pantry until the 
next trip to town. No matter how 
old the eggs are, how long they have 
been incubated by the various hens 
sitting on them; no matter that the 
heat rises and it'hat top shelf regis- 
ters 100 or more degrees, they rep- 
resent so much pin money for the 
women when taken to the village 
grocery. This is too common a 
method of keeping chickens on many 
general farms. 

No need to take our word for the 
fact that the loss from improper 
handling of farm eggs amounts to 
millions of dollars annually. Several 
years ago the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture sent one of its best men 
out in the Mississippi valley to in- 
vestigate these conditions and try 
and ascertain what the loss was 
from improper handling of eggs, and 
how to overcome it. The investiga- 



tion was carried on mostly in Kan- 
sas, though the same verdict would 
have been found in any other state. 
After spending more than one year 
in his investigation. Mr. Harry L&- 
mon, at that time Senior Poultry 
Husbandman of the Poultry Dep't., 
wrote in part, as follows: 

"The annual loss resulting from 
these sources (delays in handling 
the product) in the egg trade of the 
country totals about 15% of the 
value of the product, or $45,000,000. 
In the state of Kansas alone, where 
the investigations have been princi- 
pally carried on, the annual loss is 
estimated at more than .$1,000,000. 

"The farmer gathers the eggs 
whenever convenient, sometimes 
each day, sometimes two or three 
times a week. The eggs are brought 
to ithe house and kept until the far- 
mer makes a trip to the vilage for 
some other purpose and takes the 
eggs along. No particular attention 
is given to the conditions under 
which the eggs are kept in the mean- 
time. They may be kept in the pan- 
try or cupboard of the kitchen or 
they may be placed in the cellar 
with ithe idea of keeping them cool, 
but there is the likelyhood that the 
cellar may be damp, and the eggs in 
consequence moldy. Likewise, no 
particular effort is made to obtain 
clean eggs by proper attention to 
the nests and by frequent gathering, 
or to separate the clean from the 
soiled eggs when taken to market." 

Mr. Lamon goes on, with pages, 
showing how ithe village grocer takes 
these eggs in trade, case count, (just 
as they run) because he is afraid to 
offend the farmer or his wife and, 
perhaps, lose their trade. He also 
tells how the grocer holds them until 
he has a real shipment, then sends 
them to the city commission man 
who sorts, selects, candles, grades, 
etc., and pays for the good ones. The 
result is an extremely low price to 
the farmer for the eggs and it is the 
result of just "keeping chickens." 

Just think of iit, forty-five million 
dollars lost each year in this country 



Page Number 4 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



because people just keep chickens in- 
stead of applying a little poultry cul- 
ture, "the bestowing of care upon 
with a view of greater returns." 

The farmer .is not the only person 
who just "raises chickens." We find 
him in every city, town and village. 
He or his wife likes fresh eggs for 
home consumption and the side mon- 
ey they bring in. Perhaps a crude 
shelter called a poultry house has 
been built where the birds live midst 
filth and squallor, scratching in the 
litter (if there is any) damp and 
foul, for the scraps that are thrown 
to them. In every community you 
find people who are just raising 
chickens and keep them midst just 
such surroundings. 

Poultry Culture 

We have explained to you how 
some people "raise chickens" and 
the amount of money lost by such 
haphazard methods. Let us now see 
what can be gained by applying a 
little scientific care or poultry cul- 
ture. 

"The bestowing of care and labor 
upon" is hardly the definition for 
poultry culture most of us would 
have given, had we been asked the 
question. The tendancy of today is 
to get the greatest results possible 
with the least amount of labor, and 
it is hardly to be expected that the 
type of farmer we first mentioned 
will take kindly to any suggestion 
that calls for more care and labor. 
However, we have found that this 
type of man is, as a rule, willing to 
allow the women folks what little 
revenue is to be had from the chick- 
ens, consequently ought to have ho 
objection to anything that will tend 
to increase that revenue. Therefore, 
we hope that some of the following 
suggestions will fall on fertile 
ground, not because we do not rea- 
lize that none of Poultry Keeper 
readers are to be classed with the 
first mentioned farmer, but because 
we believe you are looking for in- 
formation that will increase your 
profits. 

Even though the man of the house 
is willing to just raise chickens, the 
women folks might really be inter- 
ested in bestowing a little care and 
labor upon the fowls, if they were 
where they could. This brings us to 
the question of poultry houses, a 
subject that has received a great deal 
of attention the past few years, and 
a line of work along which some ex- 
cellent results have been obtained. 

A few years ago it was the com- 
mon idea that a poultry house, to 
give satisfactory results, must be 
built like a refrigerator; double 
walls, air-tight, and artificially 
heated in winter. Today we find 
the best results are obtained in what 
are known as fresh-air or open front 
houses. The same principle is be- 
ing applied to humans. Fresh air 
has been found to be of great aid in 
curing ills. Half the air is night 
air and ought to be used. 

In the early days the old straw 
shed, the kind made by making a 
rough framework of poles and cov- 
ering them with straw gave better 
results than some of the latter, bet- 
ter looking, but poorly ventilated 
buildings. The cattle, hogs and 
chickens all gave better results when 
sheltered in the old straw shed or 



straw stack because they had plenty 
of fresh air. We used to say they 
got toughened to It, but whatever we 
called it, they had hardiness and 
stamina that imparted vigor to their 
offspring and we heard less about 
tuberculosis and other diseases 
caused by poor ventilation. 

Chickens will stand a great deal 
of cold, provided it is a dry cold and 
not accompanied by drafts. Why, 
way up in northwestern Canada they 
are using the open-front house and 
not frosting any combs. I can re- 
member when I was a boy and even 
up to the age of 16 or 17 I thought 
it was pretty hard if I did not have 
a warm room in winter, and we were 
afraid to open the windows. As a 
result I was anaemic, had sitomach 
trouble and catarrh. Today our win_ 
dows are opened winter and summer 
and I am healthy, ruddy and strong. 

A modern house does not need to 
be elaborate or costly. A new poul- 
try house, modern in every partic- 
ular, can be built for approximately 
$2 per head, and often cheaper, de- 
pending on where you live, price of 
material, etc. Many farmers and 
others have old barns, machine sheds 
and other outbuildings that can be 
easily made into modern fresh-air 
houses. The main thing to remem- 
ber in using an open-front house is 
that it be at least 14 feet from front 
to back, and 18 to 2 0 feet would be 
better. This is because the roosts 
are generally placed in the rear of 
the house and if nearer than 14 feet 
there is more danger of frosting 
combs. The open-front should face 
the south or southeast so as to get 
the greatest benefit of the sun on 
long winter days. 

We have seen many farm build- 
ings converted into model fresh-air 
houses by merely cutting an opening 
in the south side or end and stop- 
ping up all cracks. These openings 
come within about two feet of the 
floor and within a foot or so of the 
eaves. They should be covered with 
a fine mesh wire to keep the fowl 
in and prowlers out. It also keeps 
the snow from blowing in. It is also 
generally advisable to have these 
openings fitted with a frame that is 
covered with muslin, hinged at the 
top so they can be swung in, up and 
out of the way during the day, and 
hurriedly and easily closed at night 
or when a storm comes up that blows 
directly into the house. 

The interior equipment is very 
simple, consisting merely of a drop- 
pings board, with roosts above and 
nests underneath. 

If your house is less than 14 feet 
it might be well to have a muslin or 
burlap curtain hung directly in front 
of the roosts and this to be let down 
at night. However, it has the dis- 
advantage that it will make it much 
warmer behind this roosting curtain 
and the difference in temperature 
on extremely cold mornings is apt to 
frost a comb when the bird comes off 
the roost and before it has exercised 
and got the circulation going good. 

As mites, the dread of all poultry 
raisers, seek refuge in the cracks of 
the wall and come forth at night to 
suck their fill of the fowls' blood, it 
is well to have your roosting equip- 
ment in the form of a table so that 
it will stand out away from the wall. 



Oil is sure death to these pests, so 
if they do bother, just wrap a wick 
or soft cloth around the legs of the 
table and keep soaked with oil. The 
easiest and beat way is to keep the 
house and nests well sprayed or 
painted with a good liquid lice kill- 
er. You will find several insecti- 
cides advertised in this paper. 

The nests should be dark because 
the hen prefers a dark nest and is 
not so apt to form the bad habit of 
eating eggs. Have the nesta ar- 
ranged so the fowls can enter from 
the rear and have the front hinged 
so it can be easily let down, thus 
making it easy to gather the eggs 
and clean the nests. 

The only other necessary equip- 
ment is a drinking fount, feed, grit 
and shell hoppers. Like the house 
the equipment need not be elaborate 
or expensive. 

Now, with proper shelter for our 
fowls, we come to feeds and feeding. 

This subject will be covered in 
more detail in a later article so we 
will merely say here that the simp- 
lest way to use a good commercial 
egg mash kept in a hopper at all 
times, along with grit, shell and 
charcoal. Feed a good commercial 
scratch feed in a deep litter morning 
and night to induce exercise and fur- 
nish the fat and carbonhydrates nec- 
cessary to balance the ration. Fur- 
nish plenty of fresh water and one 
feed of some good, juicy, green feed 
at noon. This is bestowing care and 
labor upon them, but it is the kind 
that pays and puts your poultry 
keeping business into the class of 
poultry culture. This poultry cul- 
ture pays and pays well, and in the 
articles to follow we will take up in 
detail some of the many side lights 
that will show you how to get the 
biggest possible returns. 



SPROUTED OATS KEEP YOUR 
EGG FACTORY GOING 



It has always been a mystery t° 
me why so many poultry raisers are 
shutting down their egg factory dur- 
ing the fall and winter months or 
just at the time when they should 
"cash in" on their flock. 

Years ago, or before we knew 
"what was what" in poultrydom. 
fowls laid only to any extent 
during the spring months when pro- 
vided by nature with the necessary 
ingredients to manufacture eggs 
from. 

Times have changed however, and 
in no branch of farming or food 
production have more changes and 
advances been made than in that of 
the production of poultry and eggs. 
Times were when a hen with 120 
eggs in twelve months to her record 
was a little wonder; after a while the 
144 eggs hen and then the 200 egs 
hen was widely heralded, while now 
the 300 egg hen is the hero of the 
day. 

While of course scientific breeding 
and selecting has had a lot to do 
with securing such wonderful pro- 
ductive specimens, no less credit 
must be given to the investigators 
and experimenters of correct feeding 
systems and formulas. The fowls 
must be provided with the proper 
raw materials to manufacture eggs 
from. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 5 



Without calling things by their 
scientific names every successful 
breeder knows that it takes a variety 
of grains, animal protein food and 
green feed to make 'em lay, besides 
grit, shells, mash feed and clean 
drinking water. Give these articles 
regularly every day plus plenty of 
exercise and you have the whole 
thing in a nutshell to keep the hens 
happy and laying all through the 
colder months as well. 

All these food items can be se- 
cured at any time of ithe year with 
the exception of the proper green 
food, which is of such vital impor- 
tance to supply the hens with suc- 
culence and to serve them as a food 
assimdlator. 

Here again the intensive genius 
of man has come to ithe rescue of 
the poultry raisers by placing before 
him the up-to-date oat sprouter en- 
abling him to grow his own sweet, 
tender greens in any locality and at 
any time of the year. 

With one of these modern sprout- 
ers it takes so little time and it is so 
easy to produce sprouted oats — hy 
far the best green feed ever placed 
before the fowls — that it is really a 
wonder every poultry raiser is not 
in posession of one of them. 

Sprouted oats not only serves as 
food assimikitor, but also contains 
a lot of grape sugar and vegetable 
milk which is so very helpful to the 
hens in the formation of eggs. 

I would not think Qf trying to se- 
cure fall and winter eggs without giY- 
ing my hens a daily ration of this 
most excellent and best of all green 
feeds. E. H. 



HEIfS BEGINNERS 



I take this opportunity of congrat- 
ulating you upon the excellency of 
POULTRY KEEPER. I am a be- 
ginner at raising chickens and POUL- 
TRY KEEPER has been invaluable 
to me. Very truly yours, 

George Turner, 
Box 2 8, Roslyn, Pa. 



BABY CHICK MEETS 



We have just received a telegram 
from Mr. G. R. Spitzer, Sec. of Baby 
Chick Association that at the meet- 
ing in New York Saturday the Board 
of Directors of the International 
Baby Chick Association voted to hold 
the 8th annual Convention in Wash- 
ington D. C. the first week in Aug- 
ust 1923. Kansas City was second 
choice and will probably get the con- 
vention in 192 4. 



FOB THOSE WHO CAN USE HAMMER AND 
SAW 



Built and Used by Poultrymen 



Is a 96-page book; paper bound; contains 10f 
Illustrations, fully describing various styles of 
poultry houses for the large farm, as well as 
the back yard. Poultry house equipment, In 
eluding roosts; trapnests, food boxes and hop 
pers; drinking founts; fences, both permanent 
and movable; metal fence posts; brooders both 
tireless and heated; broodcoops; covered chick 
yards; poultry catchers, the popular stove- pi |n- 
hopper, and many othe useful appliances thai 
can be made at home and money saved. For 
the man who enjoyes making his own poultry 
appliances, building his own coops, houses, etc., 
this book Is of especial value. Labor-savlnr and 
money-saving devices are fully explained anil 
Illustrated so that the man who can use a ham 
mer and saw can make any of them. Prloe W> 
cents. Address Poultry Keeper, Qulncy, nilnola 



r0° 




Another Buckeye Record of 
successful growth from a modest start 



A. C. Sieb of Lincoln, Illinois, has been 
in the hatchery business eight years. 
Not until four years ago, however, did 
he install his first Buckeye Incubators 
— two No. 6 Buckeye Mammoths. 
The results of this conservative beginning 
impelled him, in February, 1 9 2 1 , to clean 
house, sell all his old machines and in- 
stall four No. 7 Buckeye Mammoths of 
10,368 egg capacity each. And in this 
short season he shipped 200,000 chicks. 
He has nearly 10,000 customers 
throughout the United States, 
shipping even to Oregon and Wash- 
ington, and to British Columbia, 
owing to the strength and vitality 
of Buckeye-hatched chicks. 
He tells us: "There is no machine that 
will equal the Buckeye. It is a time 
saver, labor saver, extremely economi- 
cal and easy to operate." 
There is no more certain source of profit 
in business today than the commercial 
hatchery equipped with Buckeye Mam- 
moth Incubators. More than eight 
hundred successful hatcheries are prov- 
ing it — and not a single failure. 
The Buckeye removes the uncertainty, 



the guesswork, the gamble, by delivering 
the highest percentage of strong, healthy 
chicks. You know to within one to five 
per cent just what your hatch will be. 
We will be glad to send our Buckeye 
Mammoth Catalog which tells all about 
this remarkable invention. Let us show 
you how to start small and grow big 
in the commercial hatchery business. 

The Buckeye Incubator Co. 
1215 Euclid Ave., Springfield, Ohio 

World's Largest Manufacturers of 
Incubators and Brooders 




Buckeye 



Buckeye Mammoths built in three sizes: 
N. 7 Capacity . . 10,368 eggs 
N. 8 Capacity . . 4,608 eggs 
N. 6 Capacity . . 2,440 eggs 



mammoth 
incubatow 



Page Number 6 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



POULTRY KEEPER 

Qulncy, Illinois 
401 Hampshire Street 
A Journal for Everyone Interested In Making 
Poultry Pay. 
Issued the First of Each Month 

Subscription Price: 
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Poultry Keeper readers are cordially invited 
lb express their opinion on any subject of 
jioultry that will be of Interest to our readers, 
give helpful talks to the Inexperienced and ask 
questions In any department. 

A. OTIS ARNOLD, Editor. 

F. RAYMOND BENSON, Ass't Editor. 



THE PUBLISHER OF THIS 

MAGAZINE IS A— 

LIFE MEMBER OF THE 

American Poultry Association 



THE OLD GUARD IS 
PASSING 



As the years pass along yvg have 
impressed upon our minds the fact 
that slowly the "Old Guard" is pass- 
ing away. Each year some of them 
answer the roll call and we loose 
their advice and encouragement. We 
cannot stop the grim reaper and all 
things are for the best. 

We wish, however, that those 
members of the old fraternity who 
are still with us would impart to us 
some of the choice bits of wisdom 
which have become theirs by reason 
of hard experience. Many prob- 
lems might be solved if they would 
turn back the leaves of time and give 
us a heart to heart talk. We of the 
younger school are doing all that it 
is possible to do to assist poultry to a 
higher level but pioneers with white 
locks and wrinkled visage have wis- 
dom which comes only to those who 
hiaze the trail. 

All honor to these poultrymen who 
ere now resting within the shadow. 
We know that they will leave us a 
Zieritage of experience which will 
prove a monument greater than any 
human hands can carve, a place of 
honor and their name shall appear 
as a member of the "Old Guard." 



WHAT'S THE LIMIT? 



One of the great questions con- 
fronting poultrymen is the limit of 
production of our domesticated hen. 
Some years ago it was thought that 
the 200 egg hen was a brain storm. 
Tu due time breeders produced her 
and no one considers the 2 00 egger 
impossible today. In fact unless you 
can produce her you will have ito 
take a back seat. Then came the 
goal of 250 eggs per year and that 
being reached they started out after 
the 300 mark. This has been at- 
tained to a remarkable degree and 
now we hear of the 32 0 and 335 
hen as possible — in fact specimens 



has reached this number of eggs in 
one year. 

The question naturally arises — 
What's the limit? Shall we say that 
325 is impossible. In view of past 
events we feel justified in believing 
that we may have 32 5 before long. 
But — What's the limit? 

We cannot say where our hen will 
break down and thus warn us that 
we have reached the dividing line be- 
tween sane and insane breeding. How 
far man may carry his scientific 
knowledge is yet to be determined 
but it is safe to say that we still 
have a wonderful future ahead and 
who can say but that we may make 
even greater strides in the future 
that we have in the past. We are 
not contented to believe that the 
limit has been reached or will be 
reached for years to come. The 350 
egger may be in the immediate fu- 
ture for all that we know. What's 
the limit? 



LET US HAVE FACTS 



A friend has called our attention 
to a writer in New York daily paper 
from which we learn that, "There is 
not a single poultry farm in the East 
selling its product at market prices 
that is paying now or ever has paid." 

The above quotation is quite 
strong language to use and in view 
of the fact that it is so far from 
the truth in the matter we consider 
it worthy of contradiction. To any- 
one who has kept in touch with poul- 
try progress it is evident that as the 
years pass the business as a whole 
has reached a higher level of effici- 
ency. It is true that there have been 
failures in the poultry business but 
these were usually due to inexper- 
ience and ignorance. So far as the 
matter is concerned, can anyone show 
us a single business of national pro- 
portions in which there have never 
been failures? Failures don't prove 
anything against a business. We all 
know that there is a demand for eggs 
and market fowls and the fact of 
the matter is that there are many, 
many farms in the East, West, North 
and South which return to their own- 
er a tidy sum each year. 

There is money in poultry as we 
proved in our article "Intensive Poul- 
try Keeping." It takes knowledge, 
ability and energy to make a suc- 
cess of this business and if we lack 
these qualities we should not get 
mad and knock the whole business. 
Let us have facts. 



INTEREST IN THE MILK 
GOAT GROWING 



We believe that it was about sev_ 
en teen years ago that the first im- 
portation of milk goats was made in- 
to this country. The interest in this 
humble animal has grown to en- 
thusiasm and we find record of a 
sale at Delevan Lake, Wisconsin, 
June 24th when twenty-nine high 
grade goats sold at auction for $25,- 
000. This seems quite a sum of 
money to pay for that number of 
animals but it proves that men of 
wealth have turned their attention to 
the goat. 

The day of the goat is dawning 
and perhaps no class should be more 



interested in them than the poultry- 
men. Many a man who keeps poul- 
try will invest in two or three goats 
(not the high priced kind just men- 
tioned) in order that his family may 
have milk of unquestionable quality. 
With milk, eggs, honey and an oc- 
casional fowl to eat and a good gar- 
den in summer — well what more 
could one want? The goat will solve 
the problem of fresh milk and poul- 
trymen will find them satisfactory. 



IN FAIRNESS TO THE 
JUDGES 



Let us quote from a paper which 
came to our desk. 

"When judges of national reputa- 
tion become so steeped in crime that 
they can no longer be trusted to ren- 
der unbiased decisions, the exhibi- 
tors should have some sort of re- 
dress." 

When such a condition as above 
described exists, then it is high time 
_ that something be done and done 
quickly. 

But does anyone believe that such 
a condition does exist? 

In fairness to our poultry judges 
we do not believe they should be 
branded as criminals until so proven 
and instead of generalities let us 
have definite charges so that action 
may be taken. Such a charge may 
or may not be true of some individ- 
ual judge but should all judges be 
condemned? We know many judges 
who are just and upright men in 
their several stations before God and 
man who never deviate from the 
minutest principle of justice. To 
bring such a charge against them is 
wrong. 

We fear that the motive back of 
this charge is not for the uplift of 
poultry keeping. Nothing is gained 
and much may be lost by such tac- 
tics. It would be far better to be 
generous and on the square and not 
call all judges crooks. 



BUY THE INCUBATOR 
EARLY 



Some people are habitually late. 
They always manage to be late in 
everything. They never do a thing 
today which they can put off until 
tomorrow. In some things this may 
not be a very serious matter but if 
one plans to install one or more in- 
cubators next season, it is none too 
early to get busy. Often when one 
waits until the season is well ad- 
vanced he will find that the incuba- 
tor factory is so rushed with orders 
that it may be weeks behind in their 
shipments. Again there is quite a 
possibility that transportation com- 
panies may not be very prompt with 
the result that the incubator may not 
reach you when you need it most. It 
really is best to place your order well 
in advance of the time you will need 
it. Suppose it does arrive a 
month ahead of the time you wish 
to start it, you will at least have the 
satisfaction of knowing that you have 
it and will not be delayed. 

Look over the advertisements and 
write for catalogs now and place 
your order so that you will not be 
hindered and perhaps loose a hatch 
or two. Last year a poultryman told 




THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 7 



us he lost $200 by delay in receiving 
incubators. It goes without saying 
that this year he will place his or- 
der early. In fact his order is al- 
ready in the hands of the manufac- 
turers. 



SHALL WE HAVE ANOTHER 
ASSOCIATION 



After events at the lasit American 
Poultry Association convention it is 
evident that utility breeders cannot 
expect much from this organization. 
The old wheel-horses claim that the 
organization was started for the ex- 
hibition end of the game. It is quite 
true that they admitted an egg stand- 
ard but unless we miss our guess 
they are going to stop and fight 
hard to a finish. Perhaps their 
finish. 

If the American Poultry Associa- 
tion does not care to recognize util- 
ity poultry another organization will 
be formed which will set up stand- 
ards which meet the requirements 
and then we will have the very un- 
happy condition of two associations 
which from the very nature of things 
will not get along very harmoniously. 

The writer is not a utility crank 
but can see the drift of things and 
wishes it were possible that the 
American Poultry Association might 
see its way clear to bring about unity 
among poultrymen instead of seem- 
ing to assume an indifferent attitude. 



ARE YOU A GOOD SPORT? 



The show season is always a good 
time to test one's sportsmanship. If 
you can loose and smile you are a 
real sport, but if you get a grouch 
on when you loose — well it would be 
better had you left your birds at 
home. 

Now days we see more real sports- 
men in the show room. Once in a- 
while we run across a crabby looser 
and it is all the more noticeable be- 
cause there are so few of them. Last 
winter we met such a fellow and he 
explained with extraordinary ferver 
just what he though about the judge 
and the show management. We did 
not ask his name but passed on, no- 
ting that he was taking no orders 
for eggs. His neighbor exhibitor 
told us that he too had lost a cov- 
eted prize but he smiled — and too 
order. He said he had sold fifteen 
sets that day. He was a real sport. 

A cheery word and a smile will 
draw trade while a snarl is repulsive. 
Let us be good sports or keep our 
birds at home. 



DO YOU READ THE ADS? 



When we receive a paper or mag- 
azine and have the time we read it 
through, ads and all. We find that 
it pays to do this and have formed 
a habit of so doing. A short time 
ago a reader of POULTRY KEEP- 
ER wanted to purchase a pen of 
fowls and wrote us regarding it. To 
our surprise we found that just that 
month an advertiser had offered just 
such a pen. We wrote the inquirer 



stating the case and within a couple 
of weeks received a second letter 
from him stating that he was just 
too late to get the pen, it having 
been sold. Had he read the ad and 
wrote the breeder instead of writing 
us first, he would have gotten the 
pen. As it is he had to pay consid- 



erable more for a pen from another 
breeder. "Me for the reading of the 
ads after this," he writes and it 
would be a good motto for us all. 

Read the ads every month for you 
cannot tell when something will be 
offered that will just meet your 
needs. 



Hens Hot Laying? 

Find it slow work getting 'em started ? 
They have been weakened growing 
new feathers. 

Pullets somewhat backward, too? Start 
them laying and paying for the feed they 
have eaten. 

Here's the way: Give them the tonic 
and conditioner which successful poultry- 
men have been using for over 50 years. 
It builds up hens weakened from molting 
— starts them laying and keeps them lay- 
ing all winter — develops pullets into Fall 
and Winter layers of high priced eggs. 

Pratts Poultry Regulator 

costs less than two cents a month per 
hen. In Nature's way — not by dangerous 
forcing or stimulating — it tones up and 
strengthens your birds so they can turn 
their feed into eggs. It's a safe and easy 
way to change your loafers into layers. 

Test it on your own flock without risk- 
ing a penny. Pratt Dealers everywhere 
are authorized to furnish Pratts Poultry 
Regulator on this guarantee— 

"Your Money Back if YOU AreNot Satisfied" 

Prevent roup, colds and other Fait troubles 
by disinfecting houses and utensils with Pratts 
Poultry Disinfectant. A safe, efficient and eco- 
nomical way to keep away disease germs and in- 
sect pests. 

PRATT FOOD COMPANY 

Philadelphia, Pa. Hammond, Ind. Toronto, Canada 

For heavy egg production — use Pratts Buttermilk 
Laying Mash and Pratts Scratch Feed. Quality 
feeds made by poultrymen for poultrymen. They 
make eggs. 



\ATTS SI 51 YEAR OF SERVICE 



Page Number 8 



SAMPLE 

JH| Makes 2 
J^GAIMSl 

Dip and Disinfectant 



We want you to try this new and better Coal 
Tar Disinfectant— the only one made in solid 
form— 

CoMejfs NOX 

Solidified Disinfectant 

Just dissolve one little cube of Conkey's 
Nox in a gallon of warm water and you have 
a gallon of Disinfecting Solution all ready 
for use. You pay nothing for bottles, barrels 
or cans; pay no freight on heavy liquid; you 
have no leaking or breaking. 

Destroys Lice, Mites, Ticks 

In combating poultry mites and similar uses, 
Conkey's Nox is undoubtedly the most efficient 
coal tar preparation known to science at the 
present time. It should be used constantly for 
cleansing and disinfecting coops, nests, roosts, 
incubators, brooders, fountains, etc. 
Use Conkey's Nox once and you will prefer it 
to any other form of Disinfectant, Extermina- 
tor or Germicide. Send 10c, coin or stamps, 
for sample package containing 2 cubes, for 
making 2 gallons. Circular free. 

THE C. E. CONKEY CO. 
6542 Broadway Cleveland, Ohio 



1 THE C. E. CONKEY CO. 

I 6542 Broadway, Cleveland, Ohio 

| Enclosed find 10 cents. Send me postpaid sample of 
. Conkey's NOX for 2 gallons of Disinfectant. 



| Name .... 
I Address.. 



Poultry Leg Bands 

THE "BEST YET" ALUMINUM. 
Not colored. Will stay on. 12,20c: 
25. 30c; 50. 60c: 100, 90c. State 
breed. 

CELLULOID SPIRAL BANDS. 
Red. Green, Amber, Pink, Black, 
White. Yellow. Purple. Light Blue. 
Dark Blue. Ruby, Cerise. 

Siiefor 12 25 50 100 250 600 

Baby Chicks. Pieeons..S. 10 $.20 $.35 $ .60 $1.25 $2.25 




Growing Chicks 15 

Leghorns, Anconas . . .20 

Rocks. Reds, etc 20 

Asiatics .25 

Turkeys, Geese . . . = . .30 
Aluminum Marker Works 



30. 
.35 
.40 
.45 
.50 



.40 

.50 
.60 
.75 
.85 



.75 
.90 
1.00 
1.20 
1.40 



1.75 
2.00 
2.25 
2.75 
3.25 



3.00 
3.50 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 



Dept. 13 Beaver Falls, Pa. 




Wants to Join Cat Club 

I have heard of the Beresford Cat Club of 
America but don't know where to get in touch 
with it and want to join. Can you help me 
out? E. J. E., Illinois. 

Write to Mrs. S. S. Kellogg, 1935 
N. Francisco, Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Soft Shelled Egss 

I seem to be getting' a lot of soft shelled 
eggs of late and wonder if you can tell me 
the cause. I feed egg shells and good grain 
and it seems to me that this ought to be 
enough. H. H., "Wisconsin. 

You must include grit, oystershell 
and charcoal in your ration if you ex- 
pect to keep your fowls in normal 
health. The soft shelled eggs will 
no doubt be remedied by keeping 
oyster shells in the hopper at all 
times. A tonic might not be a bad 
thing to give the ones which seem to 
be ran down. A better ration is 
suggested as follows: For scratch 
feed give 1 part wheat, 1 part oats 
and two parts cracked corn. For 
mash give equal parts of bran, shorts, 
corn meal and meat scraps. All to 
be by weight. 




That Sounds Like Faking. 

I have some birds which are brassy and I 
want to bleach them out so as to enter them 
in our local show. Can you give me the name 
of a good bleach for this purpose. 

E. L. L., New York. 

As we understand the Standard of 
Perfection that would be faking and 
and Tve don't believe in that and of 
course would not care to tell you 
how to do it. Very sorry about this 
and feel sure that after you under- 
stand the situation that you will look 
at At the same way that we do. 



The Leghorn Question 

I see in the last issue of POULTRY KEEPER 
that you answer A. B. C. , Illinois and say 
that Leghorns are not a market fowl. Now I 
must disagree with you on that point al- 
though in general I think you conduct the best 
"Question and Answer" department in the 
country. Now don't get puffed up but just 
give us good common sense in the future as 
you have in the past. But tell the world 
that Leghorns are good eating. 

C. C, New York. 




Here's the grain sprouter that exactly meets the re- 
quirements of every poultryman. Whether you have 
a flock of 50 chickens or several thousand there's a 
Hi style and size of 



WISCONSIN 



SECTIONAL GRAIN SPROUTER 



to meet your needs— you add extra sec- 
tions as you need them.Wisconsin Grain 
Sprouters, like the famous 
Wisconsin Incubators are 
built right. Strong 
wooden frame — heavy 
galvanized sides lined 
with thick sheets of 
Nuroid to retain 
heat. Wisconsin's 
•re n ot affected by 
moisture — they can't 
warp, shrink or swell. 
Convert* one bushel of 



Read 
These Letters: 

Wisconsin Incubator Co. 
Racine Wis. 

Purchased a "Wisconsin 
Sprouter*' from you last 
full and wish to say that it 
certainly has given me amaz- 
ing results. A flock of 
chickens without one of 
your sprouters is not 
iplete as well as un- 
profitable. 

E. L. Lambert, 
Driftwood, Okla. 



Sold on 



^— grain Into 3 bached of tender sprouts. 
30 day'i trial. Write for fife catalog— learn how 
much better Wisconstns are moitruetvd, and how much lower 
our prices are than others. We pa? freight— don't buy until 
you get our catalog. We can Bare you mossy. 

WtSCONSIH INCUBATIft CO., Dept. 14 MCIME, WIS 




Wis. Incubaior Co. 
Racine, Wis. 
' wouldn't be with- 
_ -it my Wisconsin 
Grain Sprouter, as 
tender graen sprouts 
keep i7i u chickens 
healthy and doubles 
eao yield. Get mors 
egga in winter when 
the prise is high than 
* any other time, 

Mrs. Joe Denton, 



F. Raymond Benson 



We were asked by A. B. C, wheth- 
er we would consider the Leghorn 
a good market fowl. As we under- 
stood it he wished to start in raising 
a fowl for the marked. With that 
in view we would not start with Leg- 
horns and no doubt you have bred 
Leghorns long enough to know that 
what we state is a fact. But note 
that we add that if one knows how 
he can make even the Leghorn a 
much better market fowL We don't 
want you to assume for one moment 
that we have any fight coming on 
the Leghorns. They are a good 
fowl but are better egg producers 
than market fowl. But Leghorn 
breeders must awake and breed bet- 
ter market fowls. lit is alright to 
cater to the egg side of the game 
but if you carry it too far you will 
loose your market for the table 
fowl. 



Liver Trouble 

ity chickens get dark combs and damp 
around and act sick and I am coming to you 
for help as you did so well for us before when 
the chickens were sick. B. J. K., Ohio. 

We would begin treatment by- 
giving about a half-tablespoonful of 
Epsom salts to each fowl or perhaps 
a pound to the drinking water of 
each 100 fowls. This will cleanse 
the bowels. Then add charcoal to 
the hopper and keep it before the 
fowls a1Q S5 Buys 1 40-Egg Champion I 

10 Belle City Incubator! 



Hot- Water.Copper Tank, Double Walls 
Fibre Board, Self Ref-ulated. c*-J fto.e 
S7.95 buys 140-Chick Hot- Pill" 
Water Brooder. Or both for only ■ *» 

Express Prepaid 

East of Rock' 





Ov«r 
„, d 1 911,000' 

West. U»er» 

Guaranteed. Order now. 



It tells everything. 

Belle City Incubator Co., b 0 j 145 Racine, Wis. 




Regal Quality] Still Advances—New York state Fair 

Syracuse, N. Y., September 12, 1922 
For the seventeenth time Regal-Dorcas White Wyandottes prove their 
matchless superiority ait America's greatest early exhibition by making a clean 
sweep of every prize competed for. 

Under Charles Nixon of Washington, N. J., they made the phenomenal win- 
ning of 

Cocks, 1st, 2nd, 3d, 4th, 5th; Cockerels, 1st, 2nd 3d 4th 5th. 

Hens, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th; Pullets, 1st, 2nd 3d 4th 5th. 

Pens (young) 1st, 2nd, 3d. Pens (old) 1st, 2nd, 3d. 

National W. W. Club specials for best Cock, Hen, Cockerel and Pullet. 

State Fair Commission Gold Special for Best Display. 

After placing the awards Judge Nixon's comment was: "A marvelous 
string of White Wyandottes; in quality, condition and development fully equal 
to the keenest winter competition." 



These magnificent birds should be seen to be 
appreciated. Cocks and hens in full feather, Cock- 
erels and pullets fully matured, up to weight and ab- 
solutely uniform in shape, color and head points. 

Not only as exhibition birds but also as producers 
Regal Dorcas White Wyandottes have won public 

JOHN S. MARTIN, 



approval and no strain of any breed has a stronger 
following of friends. Thousands of birds of tie same 
breeding as the winners are at your service. 200 
acres devoted to the one breed. 

Free — Send for illustrated catalogues telling all 
about the Regal Dorcas Strain. 

Box 408 PORT DOVER CANADA 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 13 



KILL THEM ALL 

Every Rat and Moose easily Des- 
troyed by New Discovery 
Not a Poison. 

Absolnte freedom from rats and mice is now 
assured everyone. No more trapping and 
poisoning jost a few. Clean out the whole 
bunch, old, yonng, big and little. 




Kick's Hat Killer kills every rat or mouse 
on your place. Most wonderful of all it does 
not harm anything but rats, mic-e, gophers, and 
other rodents. It is harmless to children, pets, 
poultry and all kinds of stock. It can be 
spread anywhere and will kill only rats and 
.nice. This death bringing disease rapidly 
spreads and quickly destroys all the rats anil 
mice. There is no smell or odor for they rim 
outside for water and die away from the 
building^ 

A Trial Costs You Nothing 

Mr. Hicks is offering everyone troubled with 
these pests the chance to get rid of them at 
no cost to themselves. He will send two large 
double strength, one dollar bottles for the 
price of one. You keep one for yourself; the 
other you sell to your neighbor at one dollar, 
thus getting your own free. Send $1.00 today 
(curren 




PURITAS SPRINGS 
S. C. W. LEGHORNS 

The World's Greatest Layers 

Trapnested for over 10 years without missing 
one day. Every nest on our farm is a trapnest. 
We trapnest every day of every year. 

Reduced Prices 

END OCTOBER 31st 

ON 8 TO 12 WEEKS OLD PULLETS, COCKERELS AND BEEEDING STOCK 

Puritas Springs Leghorns are world wonders. They shell out eggs regardless of weather condi- 
tions. They are also beautiful birds. The large white eggs they lay bring highest market 
prices. Thousands of our customers will have no other strain of Leghorns; after trying other 
strains they found Puritas Springs Leghorns always lay the most eggs in winter as well as 
summer. The demand was so great this year that we were forced to refuse hundreds of orders 
for hatching eggs and baby chicks. If you once have Puritas Springs Leghorns you will want 
no others: you'll be the proud owner of the world's very best. Send for reduced Price List 
and mention if you have our large free instructive catalog. We are fair and square and guar- 
antee satisfaction in every way. We have hundreds of letters to prove it. 

Puritas Springs Poultry Farm, Box P 111, Avon Lake, Ohio ^fURb™.'^ 



Put a Homestead fence on your farm 
this winter. Sink the posts and stretch 
the galvanized woven wire on the posts. 
You will have a fence which will last for 
generations, and the cost of your fence 
will be surprisingly reasonable. 

The Homestead knot, shown in circle 
below, is a protection to your stock for it 
does not scratch or tear. 

Send for catalog and prices. You will 
find the exact fence to suit your needs, for 
a large assortment of fences is shown. 

HOMESTEAD FENCE COMPANY 

219 Front St., Hannibal, Mo. 

MM 



KITSELMAN FENCE 




"Saved at Least 
40 Per Cent," 

Writes F. Marks, Green Lawn 
Poultry Farm, Waaswn, O. 
Cut your own fence costs 
to the bone by buying direct 
from us at Lowest Factory Prices. 
We Pay the Freight. 
' Write today for Free 100-page Catalog of 
Farm, Poultry and Lawn Fence, Barbed 
Wire, Gates, Posts, and latest low prices. 

KITSELMAN BROS. Dept 229 MUNCIE IND. 

America's Oldest Fence Manufacturers. 





Price and Quality talks You fret 
both when you buy from Brown . My 
| sensational cut prices have made fi 
big hit— lower than ever. My (1) ' 
■Direct From Factory 

freight prepaid plan 01 selling fence gate*.- . . 
poata, roofing* and painta. ib saving* money (or i_ 
600. 000 farmera. Writ" fi- eat price catalogs— fr«a. 
■ROWN FENCE & WIRE CO. A-57 ClaBrotood. DM* 



4. White Leghorn, Alfred Ter 
Haar 21 

5. White Leghorn, Grand View- 
Farm 20 

5. White Leghorn, A. C. Stor- 

mont _ z© 

5. White Leghorn, A. J. BaiL. 

man _ 20 

5. White Leghorn, Popular 

Heights Farm ~ 20 

5. White Leghorn, Martin 

Rodston ...„ _ — . 20 

5. Ancona, Dilts Bros 20 

5. Ancona, Sweet Brier Farm.. 20 
Five Highest Pens in American anjd 

English Class. 
Variety Owner Eggs 

1. Rhode Island Whites Fran- 
cis Schilling _ 84 

2. Barred Rocks, Mrs. M. R. 
Walters — - 82 

3. White Rocks, Geo. Neibru- 
egge _ _. 81 

4. White Wyandottes, Jo-hn 
Swain , 78 

5. White Wyandottes, Tip Top 
Poultry Farm — 74 

Five Highest bidividuals in American 

and English Classes 
Variety Owner Eggs 
1. Barred Rocks, Jules Fran- 
cois 24 

1. Barred Rock, Geo. Pratt ....'24 

2. White Rock, Wm. Holliday.. 22 
2. S. C. Reds, L. E. Rauch........ 22 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 15 



3., White Rock, Geo. Niebrueg- 

ge 21 

3. White Rock, Whlstlecote 

. Farm Annex 21 

3. White Rock, Samuel Hens!.. 21 
3. White Wyandotte, John 

Swain 21 

3. S. C. Red, Kenneth Pautler.. 21 
3. R. I. White, Francis Schill- 
ing 21 

3. H, I. White, Francis Schill- 
ing 21 

4. White Rock, Geo. Neibrueg- 

ge ... 20 

4. Buff Wyandotte, Mrs. R. N\ 
Nesbit 2 0 

5. Barred Rock, Mrs. M. R. 
Walters , 19 

5. Barred Rock, W. P. Skinner 19 
5. Barred Rock, John Braun.... 19 
5. White Wyandotte, Tip Top 

Poultry Farm 19 

5. R. I. White, Francis Schill- 
ing 19 

Five Highest Pens in Mediterranean 
Class 

Variety Owner Eggs 

1. White Leghorns, Ward L. 
Hull 97 

2. Whinte Leghorns, E. T. Fox 89 

3. White Leghorns, E. T. Fox 86 

4. White Leghorns, Win. E. 
Clark 84 

5. Anconas, H. E. Errettt 80 

Mve Highest Individuals in Mediter- 
ranean Class 

Variety Owner Eggs 

1. Black Leghorn, Johnson & 
Bowyer 2 4 

2. White Leghorn, Ward L. 
Hull 2 3 

2. White Leghorn, E. T. Fox.... 2 3 
2. White Leghorn, Cornbelt 

Poultry Farm 2 3 

2. White Leghorn, Mrs. Frank 
Pifer 2 3 

3. White Leghorn, Arthur 
Trockenbrodt 22 

3. White Leghorn, Northland 
Farms 22 

3. White Leghorn, Homer Col_ 

lins 22 

3. White Leghorn, E. T. Fox.... 22 

3. White Leghorn, Ward T. 

Hull 22 

3. Ancona, H. E. Errett 22 

4. White Leghorn, Francis 
Fitzsimmons 21 

4. White Leghorn, Wm. E. 

Clark 21 

4. Whiite Leghorn, Mrs. Frank 

Pifer , 21 

4. Whiite Leghorn, Cornbelt 

Poultry Farm 21 

4. White Leghorn, Cornbelt 

Poultry Farm 21 

4. White Leghorn, J. J. Peters 21 
4. White Leghorn, Ward L. 

Hull 21 

4. Ancona, H. E. Errett 21 

4. Blue Andalusian, G. F. 
Kramper 21 

5. White Leghorn, Arthur 
Trockenbrodt — . 2 0 

5. White Leghorn, Grand View 
Farm 20 



"SUCCESSFUL" Grain Sprouter- 
succulent Green Feed— Happy— Healthy 
Hens— Plenty of Fall and Winter Eggs 

Feed Sprouted Oats 3S£S58k! 

cally produced in T 'Successful" Sectional Metal Grain Sprouter. 
Get greater fertility in winter laid eggs— earlier chicks. Make 
three bushels of tempting egg-making feed from one bushel o£ 
oats, wheat or rye — increase the egg yield at least 60 per cent— 
and at same time save one-third feeding coat Write for catalog 
and 1923 offer we make on the 



99 



SUCCESSFUL 
XZlVft GRAIN SPROUTER 

Made with doable steel walls— metal trays— nothing In It to 
warp, shrink, swell or mold the food. Fireproof. Lasts a life- 
time. Large glass doors. Made in sections bo you can add more 
sections as your needs grow. There's a size for your needs 
whether you keep 60 or 600 hens. Thousands of poultry raisers 
say fhey would not be without this wonderful food maker. The 
newest, most reliable construction evermade in a grain sprouter. 
Not only turns idle hens into industrious layers but supplies 
feed for growing chicks— protects health— prevents chick loss. 
Booklet— "How to Raise 48 Out of 60 Chicks" 10 cents. 

Write today for catalog and full details of 1923 offer. 

PES MOINES INCUBATOR C0« 565TTiirdSt.,DesMoines,!owa 





'A Hatch 



October Chicks for Winter Meat and High -Priced Broilers 

GREAT MONEY IN BROILERS FROM OCTOBER CHICKS 

We pay the postage, guarantee 95 per cent live arrival 
and send FEED FREE with each order. 

S. C. White, S. C. Brown, S. C. Buff, and R. C. Brown Leghorns, 50 for $7.50; 100 for .$14.00; 50» 
for $85. Barred and White Rocks, R. C. and S. C. R. I. Reds, Buff Orpingtons, S. C. Black Min- 
orcas, Anconas, 50 for $9; 100, $17; 500 for %S0. Silver Laced Wyandottes, $10 for 50; $19 a 100. 
White Wyandottes, $10 for 50; $19 a 300; $85 for 500. Light Brahmas, $11 for 50; $21 a 100. 
Broiler chicks same as Leghorns. Catalogue free. 

NABOB HATCHERIES, i>kit. 16. gambiek, ohio 



5. White Leghorn, Wm. E. 

Clark 20 

5. White Leghorn, Homer Col- 
lins 20 

5. White Leghorn, E. T. Fox.... 20 
5. White Leghorn, E. T. Fox.... 20 
5. White Leghorn, Adolph 

Rezniek 20 

5. White Leghorn, L. E. War- 
en 20 

5. Brown Leghorn, A. F. 

Eisenhauer 20 

5. Ancona, E. R. Post 20 

We want to call the attention of 
all contestants who haven't sent in 
their entry for the coming 1922-23 
Contest that entries are coming in 
and that we cannot hold pens for 
any individuals any longer. Our 
conning contests will be better in 
many ways than the one closing in 
that we will give you publicity of 
the highest order. The winners of 
the 5 highest individuals and also 
pens will be published monthly in 
the American Poultry Journal along 



IT 8 A f ITiriN' A "y Bone Cutter claimed to be MANN'S withoot F. W. MANN CO. cast on 
^*£*k.KJ M. lv/ll< its surface, is an imitation The genuine MANN'S is made only in Milford. 

Make Your Hens Lay 

. Tou can double your egg yield by feeding fresh-cut. raw bone. It v 
contains over lour times as much egg-making material as grain and 
takes the place of bugs and worms in fowls' diet. That's why i 
gives mure eggs, greater fertility, stronger chicks, larger fowls. 

MANN'S tf 0 T D E E S L T BONE CUTTER 

Cuts easily and rapidly all large and small bones with adhering 

meat and gristle. Automatically adapts to yoi'.r strength. Never clogs. 
10 Days* Free Trial. No money down. Sf>nd for our free books today. 

F. W. MANN CO. Bos 57 MILFORD, MASS. 





Easy Way To Get Eggs 

"OCULUM" The Egg Maker has stood 
a 15 y~ar test. Its users get 2 eggs 
where they got 1. 

"OCULUM" made 48 hens jump from 
S to 42 eggs a day." 

H. C. Miller, Judge N. P. Ass'n. 

AJcron, O. 

Bradley, Fishel and other fanciers 
praise it. This Journal O. K.'s it. 

Bottles 50c and .$1.00 postpaid. Book- 
let FREE. 

The "OCULUM" Co., Box S, Salem, Va. 
Dealers Handle. Guaranteed. 
AGENTS wanted 



Cured Her 

Rheumatism 

Knowing the terrible experience the suffer- 
ing caused by rheumatism, Mrs. J. E. Hurst, 
who lives at 608 E. Douglas Street, C-» 
Bloomington, 111., is so thankful at having cured 
herself that out of pure gratitude she is anx- 
ious to tell all other sufferers just how to get 
rid of their torture by a simple way at home. 

Mrs. Hurst has nothing to sell. Merely mail 
your own name and address, and she will gladly 
send you this valuable information entirely 
free. Write her at once before you foryet. 



Page Nnmber 16 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



For Use i 
On Your Poultry] 

Seize the hen and dust Instant 
Louse Killer into the feathers. 
The handy sifting top can 
makes it convenient to use. 
Sprinkle it in the nests, on the 
roosts and floors. Put Instant 
Louse Killer in the dust bath 
occasionally — your hens will 
do the rest. This means 
louse prevention. 

FOR STOCK 

| With one hand stroke the hair 
the wrong way, with the other 
I sift in the Louse Killer. 
| Especially good for lousy colts. 

GUARANTEED. The dealer 
will refund your money if it 
Hfdoes not do as claimed. 

1 lb., 25c; 2% lbs., 50c 
( Except in the far West and Canada) 

Dr. HESS & CLARK 
Ashland Ohio ' 



Wipe Out Every 
Rat and Mouse 

Amazing Discovery Quickly Kills 
Them All. Not a Poison. 

Eats, Mice, Gophers, — in fact, all Rodents 
can now be wiped out easily and quickly. 
Imperial Virus will do it. The original, time- 
tested Danyz, fluid true Virus. Entirely 
harmless to humans, poultry, stock, pets, etc. 




Infects Rodents only. Greedily eaten on 
bait. Sets up burning fever. The pests die 
outside, hunting air and water. Imperial Virus 
is put up in sealed bottles, guaranteed to re- 
tain full strength and potency. Only safe and 
sanitary method to overcome these pests. In- 
dorsed by more than 00,000 users, including 
Farm Bureau Experts, numerous factories and 
large nationally known institutions. 

YOU CAN GET YOURS FREE 

Send no money — just your name and address, 
to Imperial Laboratories, Dept. 1750, Kansas 
City, Mo., and they will send you by return 
mail two regular full-sized $1.00 bottles of Im- 
perial Virus (double strength). Pay the post- 
man only $1.00 and a few cents postage when 
the package containing the two bottles arrives. 
Use one to rid your place of the pests, and 
sell the other to a neighbor, thus getting yours 
free. Special inducements to represent us. 

NOTE — Readers risk no money in ac- 
cepting the above offer, as Imperial Lab- 
oratories are fully responsible, and on 
your request will refund your $1.00 any 
time within 30 days, if you are not entire- 
ly satisfied with the results. 



with pictures of same. This adver- 
tising you will get free but if you 
had to pay for it it would run in a 
good sized sum each month. Also 
each contestant beside the report 
each month, will receive a monthly 
record showing the daily production 
of his or her fowls. This we believe 
will be a big help and will please 
you. That we are able to give your 
birds proper care is proven by the 
number of 200 egg individuals now 
in both contests and they still have 
two more months to go. Get your 
entry in by return mail if you have 
not already done so. We want to 
make records for you and believe 
we will be able to do so. Practically 
all birds in tihe contests are molting 
or finishing their molt which ac- 
counts for the above seemingly low 
record. 



INTENSIVE POULTRY 
KEEPING 

F. Raymond Benson 
(Continued from last issue) 



The danger from disease is great 
on the intensive poultry plant and is 
always a factor which needs serious 
reflection. At no time should the 
watchful eye fail to detect any sign 
of sickness and at the first symptom, 
should be taken to check and eradi- 
cate the trouble. Prompt action is 
always necessary and no case of 
sickness should be allowed to exist 
among the flock for a moment after 
discovery. A hospital is a good 
thing and it should be away from 
the other buildings and ailing fowls 
should be hustled to this place as 
soon as it is discovered that they are 
sick. Notwithstanding that the ut- 
most care be exercised it will happen 
that some loss will occur. As a gen- 
eral rule the loss on an intensive 
plant will be greater than on a free 
range plan. However, if you will 
study sickness and disease and use 
your knowledge to overcome sickness 
you can accomplish wonders. We re- 
call keeping six hens in one old Philo 
coops and by keeping the coop 
clean and watching diligently for 
disease we were able to make the 
pen pay well, in fact better than some 
of the other and more roomy pens 



We had to watch very closely that 
no sickness developed for the closer 
the quarters the more difficult it is 
to fight disease, once it gets started. 

The last disadvantage we will 
mention has never had a personal 
application but observation has prov- 
en it to be perhaps the most potent 
and fatal reason for so many fail- 
ures in the poultry business, either 
extensive or intensive. We refer to 
the monotony of the work. How 
true it is that would-be poulitrymen 
rush into this business after a few 
months of problems and perplexities 
they decide that it is not suited to 
them and they rush out again. They 
may never dream that they are not 
suited to the poultry business. Poul- 
try has always had to take the blame. 
Very funny that it is never the man. 
Once in awhile some fellow comes 
along and delves into the whys and 
wherefores and finds that this fickle- 
minded, would-be poultryman just 
got tired of the grind of doing one 
chore after another and so threw up 
the whole thing. A successful poul- 
tryman must have that staying and 
sticking quality which will enable 
him to stand up and face problems 
every day, which will enable him to 
keep plugging away no matter what 
occurs and to stay by the job even 



Brower's Non-Freeze . 
Lampless Poultry Fountain 



Keeps water at drink- 
ing temoerature winter 
and summer; cool in 
Bummer and warm in 
winter. Made of gal- 
vanized iron, on princi- 
ple of thermos bottle, 
with lined and seahd air 
space between. Order 
from advertisement. 
Satisfaction guaranteed 
or money returned. 

1 gal., $2.50 — three for $6.75 
%Vz gal., 3.50 — three for 9.50 
5 gal., 4.50 — three for 12-00 
Eggs are 74% water, bo give your chickens plenty 
of good fresh water at the right temperature. 

Write for Catalog of Poaltry Supplies, 
BROWER MFG. CO., Box 100 Quincy, MI. 




QUALITY BANDS, 

White, blue, red, green, yellow, 
black. 100, 51.00; Leghorn 
size 100 90c 

Liberty Band Co. Bx E, Belleville, 111. 



1000 EGGS 



In EVERY HEN 



If You Keep Chickens 

CUT THIS OUT 



"The great trouble wiUi the poultry business 
has always been that the laying life of a hen 
was too short" says Henry Trafford, Inter- 
national Poultry Expert and Breeder for 
nearly eighteen years Editor of Poultry Suc- 
cess. 

The average pullet lays 150 eggs. If kept 
the second year, she may lay 100 more. Then 
she goes to market. Yet, It has been scienti- 
fically established that every pullet is born 
or hatched with over one thousand minute egg 
germs in her system — and will lay them on a 
highly profitable basis over a period of four to 
6ix years' time if given proper care. 

How to work to get 1,000 eggs from every 
hen; how to get pullets laying early; how to 
make the old hens lay like pullets; how to 
keep up heavy egg production all through cold 



winter months when eggs are highest; triple 
egg production; make slacker hens hustle; 
$5.00 profit from every hen in six winter 
months. These and many other money making 
poultry secre ts a re contained in Mr. Trafford' s 
"1,000 EGG HEN" system of poultry raising, 
one copy of which will be sent absolutely free 
to any reader of this paper who keeps six' 
hens or more. Eggs should go to a dollar or 
more a dozen this winter. This means big 
profit to the poultry keeper who gets the eggs. 
Mr. Trafford tells how. If you keep chickens 
and want them to make money for you, cut 
out this ad and send it with your name and 
address to Henry Trafford. Suite 1000 R, Herald 
Bldg. , Blnghamton. N. T., and a free copy 
of "The 1,000 EGG HEN" will be sent by 
return mail. 




THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 17 



With Cheap Incubators 

It's a shame to waste your time and eggs hatch- 
ing weak, wobbly chicks in cheap incubators, 
when everyone knows that 

Queen Incubators 

Hatch Strong, Healthy Chicks— 
That live and Grow! 

A good incubator is the start to profitable poul- 
try production — it's the cheapest thing you can bay. 

One dealer who has sold Queen machines for 9 
years says: "I can get hundreds of testimonials 
of stronger chicks and almost perfect hatches 
with the Queen." 

You, too, will hatch better chicks with a Queen 
Incubator and raise more of them with the 
Queen Brooder. Ask about the remarkable 
Queen Brooder Stove. If your dealer doesn't 
sell Queens, write ns. Catalog free. (54) 

QUEEN INCUBATOR CO. 
Lincoln Nebraska 



Cured His Rupture 

I was badly raptured while lifting a trunk 
several years ago. Doctors said my only hope 
of cure was an operation. Trusses did me no 
good. Finally I got hold of something that 
quickly and completely cured me. Years have 
passed and the rupture has never returned, al- 
though I am doing hard work as a carpenter. 
There was no operation, no lost time, no trouble. 
I have nothing to sell, but will give full infor- 
mation about bow you may find a complete 
cure without operation, if you write to me, 
Kugene M. Pullett, Carpenter, 16J, Marcellus 
Avenue, Manaequaa, N. J. Better cut out this 
notice and show it to any others who are rup- 
tured — you may Have a life or at least stop the 
misery of rupture and the worry and danger of 
an operation. 



Rheumatism 

A Remarkable Home Treatment 
Given by One Who Had It. 

In the year of 1803 I was attacked by 
Muscular and Sub-Acute Rheumatism. I suf- 
fered as only those who are thus afflicted 
know for over three years. I tried remedy 
after remedy, but such relief as I obtained 
was only temporary. Finally, I found a 
treatment that cured me completely and 
such a pitiful condition has never returned. 
I have given it to a number who were ter- 
ribly afflicted, even bed-ridden, some of 
them seventy to eighty years old, and the 
results were the same as in my own case. 

I want every sufferer from any form of 
muscular and sub-acute (swelling at the 
joints) rheumatism, to try the great value 
of my improved "Home Treatment" for its 
remarkable heating power. Don't send a 
cent; simply mail your name and address, 
and I will send it free to try- After you 
have used it, and it has proven itself to be 
that long looked for means of getting rid of 
such forms of rheumatism, you may send 
the price of it, . One Dollar, but understand 
I do not want your money unless you are 
perfectly satisfied to send it. Isn't that 
fair? Why suffer any longer, when relief 
is thus offered you free. Don't delay- 
Write today. 

MARK H. JACKSON, 5S-J, Durston, Bldg. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Mr. Jackson is responsible. 
Above statement true. 



RHODE ISLAND REDS 



Origin and history of both the Rose Comb 
varieties. How to mate for best results, by 
leading breeders of R. I. Reds. Edited by D. 
R. Hale, judge and breeder. Color plate and 
feathers by F. L. Sewell. 88 pages, 9 by 12, 
Illustrated. Price 75c. Address Poultry Keep- 
er, Quincy, Dlinois. 



if it would seem much more pleasant 
to quit. The poultry business is no 
place for a quitter. If you have that 
staying quality and can tide over the 
discouragements which come during 
the first year or two, the chances are 
that you will begin to see the pleas- 
ure which comes from real results 
and will be able to enjoy these same 
problems which at first were very 
discouraging. 

If you can stick it out for three 
years there is hope for you. But we 
warn you never to loose sight of the 
fact that poultry keeping is not all 
pleasure, not until you become a 
real, dyed-in-the-wool enthusiast and 
then you would stay in the game 
anyway. 

Assuming that you will locate your 
intensive plant we wish to explain 
a few points which will be useful in 
deciding where it is best to locate. 
In the first place unless you expect 
to develop a large plant we suggest 
that you locate as near to your mar- 
ket as possible. Suppose that you 
are producing eggs and could locate 
your plant so that customers would 
call for the eggs. That would be a 
saving well worth your considera- 
tion. If you are going to fatten 
fowls this will apply just as well. 
The closer you are to your market 
the better. 

In choosing a site for your plant 
look well to the soil. It should be 
loose and a sandy loam is desirable. 
Above all things see that it is well 
drained. The soil should be dry. It 
is also an excellent idea to avoid the 
prevailing cold winds of winter, if 
possible. 

(Continued November issue) 



THE ASIATICS 



Only Book On This Subject 



The largest and best lUustrated book Issued 
to date on mating, breeding, selecting and ex- 
hibiting Light and Dark Brahmas, Buff, Par- 
tridge, Black and White Cochins, and White 
and Black Langshans. Special articles by fore- 
most breeders, whose accumulated experience 
and knowledge Is thus made available at nominal 
cost. 



SPLENDID LEGBANDS 



We call the attention of our read- 
ers to the Spiral Legbands adver- 
tised in this issue by the Liberty 
Band Company, Box E, Belleville, 
Ilinois. Many people prefer colored 
bands and we can recommend the 
Liberty Band Company most heartily 
to our readers. 



SUCCESSFUL BACK-YARD POULTRY 
KEEPING 

A new one yust off the press. Tells every- 
thing yrm need to know about poultry keeping 
on n small scale to insure success. The largest, 
most complete and down-to-date book on the 
subject ever published. WU1 turn failure Into 
success and Is an Invaluable guide to any be- 
ginner. 

ISvyry person who Is keeping fowls on a 
small scale or is planning to do so — everyone 
who wants to learn about the latest practical 
methods adapted to back-yard conditions — will 
want this big, truly helpful book. Every im- 
portant phase of the subject Is covered In the 
seventeen chapters contained within Its pages, 
from the laying out of the plant to the use of 
artificial Illumination — the new method that 
positively doubles and more than doubles fall 
and winter production. Whether you are In- 
terested In poultry keeping simply to produce 
a supply of eggs for home use or as a money- 
making side line, you need this practical 
down-to-date book. 

"Successful Back-Yard Poultry Keeping" 
contains 104 pages, 8% by 12 Inches, over 100 
Illustrations and a beautiful three-color art cover 
by Schilling. Price $1.00. postpaid. Address, 
Poultry Keeper, Quincy, Illinois. 



BREAKS EGG RECORD! 



160 Hens Make $1,392.67 With Bis, 
Saving' in Peed. 



96-Page Free Book to Poultry Rais- 
ers Explains How. 



Every reader of Poultry Keeper 
should immediately write Prof. Quis- 
enberry for his 9 6-page Free Book, 
"Dollars and Sense in the 'Poultry 
Business." Over 46 ; 000 successful 
Poultry Raisers in the United States, 
Canada and 2 0 foreign lands are 
making money the "Quisenberry 
Way." This book explains in under- 
standable language these simple se- 
crets of rearing, breeding and feed- 
ing for big egg yield. 




Prof. Quisenberry is recognized as 
one of America's foremost poultry 
authorities. His master stroke was 
the working out of the "Quisenberry 
Way" to bigger poultry profits which 
already has gained world-wide rec- 
ognition as the most valuable and 
dependable methods ever given to 
poultry raisers. Thousands praise 
these simple, easy to follow methods 
and tell of wonderful results. 

Get this 9 6-page free book telling 
how to select good layers and how to 
cull the loafers; how to mix and bal- 
ance feed rations to get big egg 
yield; save feed bills and a thousand 
simple money making secrets. Every 
reader of this paper can make more 
money from their poultry than they 
ever dreamed was possible. 

Prof. Quisenberry's methods are practical — 
easy for anyone to apply. Every one worth 
cash dollars to you. What thousands of others 
have done you can do — but remember, to make 
money you must know how to get big e«" 
production. 

WRITE TODAY. You need this big 96-page 
book now. No time to wait. It costs you 
nothing. You can turn failure into success — 
it's just as easy to make money as to lose 
money— if you just know the simple method of 
HOW. Make your feed return you dollars in 
eggs. You positively cannot afford to Ignore 
this generous offer — never before has a book- 
like this been given free. It is fully illustrated 
— page after page that means money to yon. 
Get your copy right now. New edition ready. 
Address Prof. T. E. Quisenberry, Dean Ameri- 
can Poultry School, Dept. 4018, Kansas City, 
Mo. 



Poultry Leg Bands 



Colored Leader, Adjustable, fit 

anything from bantam to goose, 
numbered consecutively, 5 colors: 
Red, Blue, Green, Yellow, Pink. 
100, $1.50; 50, $1.00; 25, 60c. 

Heavy Aluminum, numbered con- 
secutively, large raised figures, mil- 
lions sold, adjustable, will stay on. 
100, G0c; 50, 35c; 25, 20c. 

Celluloid Spiral, 5 colors, 
Red, Blue, Green, Pink, Yellow; 
can be easily distinguished. 

., . 12 25 50 100 250 500 

No. 1 Asiatics $.25 .45 $.75 $1.20 $2.75 $5.00 

No. 2 Rocks, Reds, etc. .20 .40 .60 1.00 2 25 4.00 

No. 3 Leghorns, etc. . . .20 .35 .50 .90 2l00 3.50 

Prices -are postpaid. State color and breed. 
Eureka Supply House, Box K, Mt. Morris, III. 





Pagt Number 18 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



HOW TO GET LOTS OF EGGS 



"OCULUM" has no equal as an 
egg producer, so its users say. It 
takes the place of Remedies and Ton- 
ics. Journals and Experiment Sta- 
tions praise it. A trial tells all. 
Mail 10c /to the "OCULUM" Co., 
Salem, Va. You will be pleased with 
results. 



John Murry, 'the Single Comb 
Rhode Island Red breeder of Stan- 
berry, Missouri, has moved to a 
larger place and he will be able to 
raise many more Reds to furnish his 
ever increasing number of customers. 



Mr. O. R. Hoffman of Kansas City, 
Kansas, has just completed a new 
poultry plant. They will keep grow- 
ing. Must pay, don't you think? 



MAKE TIP A CLUB 

Make up a club of your own, choosing the 
papers or magazines you want to take. Write 
and let me quote a special cut price. I can 
save yon considerable money on your subscrip- 
tions. A. Otis Arnold, Quiney, Illinois. 



ANCONAS 



BARGAIN PKICES — SHEPPARD STRAIN S. 

C. Anoouas. Pullets, yearling hens and cock- 
erels. Am leaving farm must sell by Nov 1st. 
Write Omer D. Snyder, Stewartvllle, Minn. 



SINGLE COMB ANCONAS — SHEPPARD 

Strain. Hens, pullets, .$2.50, $3.50; cockerels 

SI. 50 to $5.00 each. Ella Whitewood, Hudson. 

111. 10-3 



R. C. ANCONA COCKERELS— Early hatched 
— cheap. Mrs. E. J. Crawford, Owatonna, Minn. 



BANTAMS 



BANTAMS AND EGGS— 22 Varieties . 2c stamp 
for circular. Fenn Bantam Tarda, (Desk 77), 

IMavan. Wis. 



BRAHMAS 



QUALITY LIGHT BRAHMAS— MRS. BURCH- 

ell, Rossmoyne, Ohio. 



L. BRAHMA COCKERELS, PURE BRED, 

satisfaction guaranteed, S3. 00. Alois Funke. 
Breese, HI. 



LIGHT BRAHMAS— COCKERELS, $5.00; PUL- 

lets, $4.00; hens, $3.00. Only the best sent 
out. E. 8. Soanes Poultry Yards, 1611 Broad- 
way, Bay City, Mich. 



LIGHT BRAHMAS— Cavey Farm, Elkhorn, Wis 

12-12 



DOGS 



RABBIT HOUNDS, FOXHOUNDS. COON. 

Opossum. Skunk. Squirrel. Wolf. Groundhog 
dogs, Setters. Airedales. Circular 10c. Brown's 
Kennels. York Pa. 7-G 



DUCKS AND GEESE 



BUFF ORPINGTON DUCKS, TRIOS, $5.00. 

Pens, $8.00. Rauch's Poultry Yard, .Tenera, 
Ohio. 10-2 



LARGE WHITE PEKIN DUCKS; DRAKES, 

$2.00: duck. $1.50 if taken at once. Mrs. Marv 
A. Ranev, Walton, Dl. 



PURE WILD MALLARD AND COLORED MUS- 

covey Dnrl.-s for sale. Oliver H. Ridgeway, 
Oxford. Maryland. 



0 . O 

| BREEDER'S CARDS | 

o o 

FERRETS 



FERRETS FOR SALE— BROWN OR WHITE, 

large or small, either sex; only the best stock. 
W. A. Peck, New London, Ohio. 9-4 



JERSEY GIANTS 



JERSEY GIANTS FOR SALE. CIRCULAR 

free. E. Benson, Randall, Iowa. 



LEGHORNS 



500 SINGLE COMB WHITE AND BROWN 

Leghorn 1 year hens, cockerels and pullets. 
A. Schroeder, St. Peter, 111. 



WHITE LEGHORNS 



ENGLISH COCKS FROM IMPORTED PEN. 

Cockerels, hens, and pullets from high record 
stock. Large and full of vigor. None better. 
Chas. W. Johnson, Linton, Ind. 



WHITE LEGHORNS— BARRON'S ANDERSONS 

Cockerels, $1.50. Wm. Yearly, Granite Falls, 
Minn. 



PURE BRED FERRIS WHITE LEGHORN. 

Choice young hens, 265-300 egg strain. Hogan 
tested, $1.50 each, no reduction. April cock- 
erels, $1-00. Mrs. Roy Appleton. Edgewood, 
Iowa. 



ATTENTION! BARGAIN! BOTT'S MONEY 

Maker English Single Comb White Leghorns. 
306 to 289 e?~ strain. Cockerels at reduced 
rices for October sale. A few mated pens. 
Ernestine Bott, Box E, Brighton, HI. 



WE OFFER NOW FOR IMMEDIATE SALE $5 

and $10 quality Pedigreed Cockerels at $2 and 
$3 each; Cock birds $5. 25,000 chicks each 
week 1923. Imported Barron and Young 
strains S. C. White Leghorns, raised separately. 
No lien under 248-egg record in six years breed- 
ing. Tray nested. Pedigreed. Reduced prices. 
Circular. Brownstown Poultry Farm, Browns- 
town, Ind. 



BROWN LEGHORNS 



KULP'S COCKERELS, $1.60; BOTH COMBS. 

Wm. Yearly, Granite Falls, Minn. 



S. C. DARK BROWN LEGHORNS— Eggs only. 
6c each delivered. Willis Fairbanks, Mora, 
Minn. 



v7. W. KULP, BOX 30, POTTSTOWN, PA 

The leaders In size and contest winners. Cata- 

'ng. Both combs. 



BLACK MINORCAS 



MINORCA COCKERELS— S. C. PURE BRED, 

satisfaction guaranteed, $3.00. Alois Funke, 
Breese, IU. 



SINGLE COMB BLACK MINORCAS— Early 
hatched pullets, Cockerels. Also few breeders 
winter layers. Table Egg Farm, Lookout, Penn. 



BLUE ORPINGTONS 



LOOK — Royal Bine Orpingtons. Winners. John 
Dnangst, 1214 Prairie Ave., Free port, m. 8-12 



BUFF ORPINGTONS 



SINGLE COMB BUFF ORPINGTON COCKER- 

els. February hatched. Also several good 
yearling pens. Walter Goessling, 930 Jeffer- 
son. St., Quincy, 111. 



PIGEONS 



PIGEONS— ALL VARIETIES FANCY PIGEONS 

Importer and breeder. J. Rybak, 939 No. Lock- 
wood Ave., Chicago, HI. 10-12 



OFFER— MATED HOMERS, $2.00 PALR. BEAU- 

tiful White Homers, S3. 00 pair. Get my prices 
on Runts, Carneaux, Maltese Hens. Free book- 
let. Squab manual 50c. Charles B. Gilbert. 
2210 Almond St., Philadelphia, Pa. 10-6 



RHODE ISLAND REDS 



VIGOROUS COCKERELS FROM REDS THAT 

lay! Rose comb. Prices reasonable. Circular. 
Albert Bernhardt, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. 



ROSE COMB RED EGGS — From prize winners 
ind record layers. (Bean strain.) Mating list. 
Daugherty's Poultry Farm. Metcalf. HI. 8-2 



PRINTING 



BETTER POULTRY PRINTING— Prepaid every- 
where for half for what others charge. Being 
specialists we invariably please our thousands 
of satisfied customers. Special — 150 either 
cards, envelopes noteheads. tags, labels. SI. 00 
prepaid. Latest cuts. Interesting samples, 
snecial bargain sheet for stamp only. Mnd"l 
Printing Company. Manchester. Iowa. 9-12 



O O 

| BREEDER'S CARDS | 

o o 

BARRED ROCKS 



"CACKLERS" .ARE PUREBRED BEED-TO- 

Lay Barred Rocks. Trapnested by Geo. W. 
Pratt, Cropsey, III. Bargain prices on either 
young or old stock. Unrelated pens. Write 
wants plainly. Ciicular free. 



PARKS ROCKS— Eggs that will hatch. Cata- 
log. W. W. Kulp, "Box 30, Pottstown, Pa. 



MY VICTORY STRAIN OF BARRED ROCKS— 

Won at Toledo, O., Nov. 29th to Dec. 4tli, 1921. 
3, 4, 5. Ex Cock; 2 Ex Cockerel; 1, 2, Ex Hen; 
3 Ex Pullet; 1, 2, Pullet Bred Cock; 2 Cock- 
erel Bred Ten; Silver Medal for Best Display. 
Barred Rock Club shape and color specials. 
Send for photo of my winning birds. J. T. 
French, 838 West Grove Place, Toledo, Oliio. 



SEVERAL VARIETIES 



FOR SALE— COCKERELS AND COCK BIRDS 

from prize winning Single Comb Reds and 
Thompson's Barred Rocks; $3 and $5 each. 
Mrs. Louis Morris, Buckner, Mo. 10-2 



BUFF ORPINGTON DUCKS— ROSE COMB AN- 

conas, 3 for $5.00. John Byer, Kalida, Ohio. 

10-2 



WHITE WYANDOTTE COCKERELS $3 AND 

$3 each. Eggs for hatching from first prize 
winners. White Wvandottes R. C. R. Island 
Reds, Indian Runner Ducks, $2.00 pr 15. Car- 
neaux Pigeons, $3 pair. Lew H. Stewart, Route 
4, Sioux City, Iowa, 10-3 



ALL KINDS OF PUREBRED PRIZEWTNNLNG 

poultry and pets. Prices reasonable. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. Peter Bros., Randolph, 
Minn. 



APRIL HATCHED PULLETS OR COCKERELS 

— From Parks pedigreed stock direct. Also 
(Woods) Light Brahmas, $2 each; $22 dozen. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Eva Bojar, St. Be- 
nard, Ohio. 8-3 



SHEPPARD S. C. ANCONA AND PENNSYL- 

variia S. C. W. Leghorn eggs for hatching, 
$2.50 per 15. H. E. Ritter, Middleburg. Pa. 



BUFF WYAND 0 TTES 



BUFF WYANDOTTES— CHOICE COCKS, HENS, 

cockerels and pullets reasonable. Jess Stros- 
nider, Mt. Washington, Ohio, 10-4 



WHITE WYANDOTTES 



WHITE WYANDOTTE COCKERELS AND 

Pullets for sale. Bred 16 years for show and 
heavy egg production. Robert Fetrow, Etters, 
Pa. 



AGENTS 



AGENTS — Sell guaranteed egg producing poul- 
try tonic, money back agreement, agents pro- 
tected, special inducement " to dealers. Mack 
Products, 29 Times Plaza, Brooklyn, N, Y. 



POULTRY SHOW 



MADISON SQUARE GARDEN SHOW— Bnyer's 
Guide (list of exhibitors) free. Official Marked 
Catalog 75 cents. Both books very valuable. 
Send for them. Address D. Lincoln Orr, Seo'y. 
Box 23, Orr*s Mills— Cornwall, N. Y. 



REAL ESTATE 



WANT TO HEAR FROM OWNER HAVING 

poultry farm or other property for sale. State 
cash price and particulars. John 3. Black, 
278th St.. Chippewa Falls, Wis. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



FOR RENT— GOOD POULTRY FARM WELL 

located near town electric and steam car ser- 
vice. Amos Hougland, Underwood, Ind. 



PLANS FOR POULTRY HOUSES! ALL 

styles 150 illustrations; secret of getting win- 
ter eggs, and copy of "The Full Egg Basket." 
Send 25c. Inland Poultry Journal, Dept. 69. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 10-5 



FOR SALE — Check protector, adding machine, 
parcel-post scales, comet, caponizing outfit, 
hygrometer, Sure Hatch Incubator. Write for 
description and price. Want to buy Lnken- 
velders. F. Raymond Benson, Elgin, 111. 



RADIO FOR EVERYBODY. Learn nt home, 
the Construction of Radiophone and Telegraph 
Receivers for Beginners", of 18 chapters, fully 
Illustrated. 80 cents post paid. Free catalnirs 
of all the latest and best Radio. Automobile, 
Tractor and Electrical books. V. M. Co,icli. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

The classified advertisers In POULTRY 
KEEPER are coining money fast this year. 
It pays to keep your announcement before 
the people. That Is the way to establish 
a reputation for your business. Why not 
go after the people, get good prices, and 
make more money this year? 

RATES 

Bates for Ads. Classified under proper 
Headings are as follows: 

1 month 6c per word 

2 months 11c per word 

8 months 16c per word 

4 months _ 20c per word 

1 year 60c per word 



10% Water 



Heavy Drinkers Are Heavy Layers: 

Water is a natural tonic just as important as 
feed. Get full value from high priced feeds. 
Increase egg production and profits by keeping 
warm water before your hens all the time. 

Eureka s»SSn S Fountain 

KEEPS WATER WARM 24 HOURS 
No lamp, no Are, no danger. No upkeep. No 
trouble. Only up-to-date Sanitary Fountain. 

Drinking cup does not project beyond outer can. 
No possible chance to catch litter or filth. No 
contamination. Water always warm, clean and 
pure. Made of heavy galvanized iron. Built 
like fireless cooker. Works like thermos bottle. 
Simply fill every evening with hot water — that's 
all. Hens will havo plenty of pure, clean, warm 
water early in the morning just when they want 
it and need it most. 

Made in Three 
Sizes, as Follows: 

2 gallon size, 15% 
ins. high; 13 ins. di- 
ameter; 15 lbs. weight. 

each. . $3.50 

3 gallon size, 18 ins. 
high; 14 ins. diame- 
ter; 20 lbs. weight. 

each!' $4.00 

5_ gallon size, 22 ins. 
high; 15 ins. diame- 
ter; 30 lbs. weisht. 

each. . $5.00 

BACK TRIAL OFFER— Oroer direct 
this ad today. The "Eureka is a necessity 
year round fountain. Keeps warm water 
in winter and cold water cool in summer, 
years thousands of satisfied users. Money 
if not absolutely satisfied. Order today— 

EUREKA SUPPLY HOUSE 

3 Wesley Avenue Mount Morris, Illinois 




warm 
Last 
hack 
NOW 



When writing 1 
this paper. 



advertisers please mention 



HAWK SET 



Guaranteed to catch all hawks 
that are taking your poultry or 
your money returned. Price GOc. Anthony 
Henak, Oxford Junction, Iowa. 

LIGHT AND DARK BRAHMA S 

Show birds and choice breeders in old 
and young stock for sale reasonable. 

MILLER POULTRY FARMS 
Lancaster, - - Mo. 



Quality Chicks 



9c Up. 



From best laying strains, 12 
varieties. Breeding stock liens 
$1.50 up. Cocks and cockerels. 

Free 32-page catalog and reduced price list. 
Missouri Poultry. Farms, Columbia, Mo. 



Why Not Get REAL TOM BARRON Leghorn Chicks and Eggs 

from a firm that has imported direct each year since 1915, at prices but 
little higher than the Commercial Hatcheries charge for common stock. 
Chicks $15. Ou per 100, $13.50 per 100 after June 1st. Eggs $8.00 per 100 
with free replacement for all non fertiles. Orders filled promptly from this 
ad or send for descriptive list to 

COLEMAN MILES EGG FARM, Importers. Box N. Mt. Carroll. 111. 

BALLARD'S SUPREME WHITE ROCKS 



Have mated some fine pens for the eg 
T. VV. BALLARD, 



trade from my Champion winners. Mating list on request. 

GALESBURG, ILL. 



WHAT'S CA pON 



AND 
WHY? 



A book that explains why Capons are the most profitable part of the poultry business and everything 
you will ever want to know about CAPONS. 50 pictures from life that show each step In the 
operation. List of Capon Dealers' addresses. Tells how to prevent "Slips," where to get the 
best and cheapest capon tools. Capons are immense eating. Big profits realized. Get wise. This 
book tells how. Copyrighted new and revised edition. Eegular 50c copy, prepaid to your address 
(a short time only) for a Dime in coin or stamps. 

GEORGE BEUOY, B. E. 17, CEDAB VALE, KANSAS. 



HORNER'S PEDIGREED S. C. REDS 

We are now ready to furnish you with blue ribbon cockerels 

and pullets for early show. 
ERNEST G. HORNER, R. 7, Box 30, QUINCY. ILL. 



Classified Advertising Pays 

Don't just take onr word that Poultry Keeper leads all others and is "recognized as the best paying medium for poultry advertising 

f ^ What Advertisers In 1921 Say: fr == ^ 

$4.00 

Pays 
for a 

20 
Word 

Classified 
Ad 

4 

Months 



What Advertisers In 1921 Say: 

Classified advertisers have invariably reported excellent results 
from the use of this kind of advertising in POULTRY KEEPER. 
This is due to the low rate which we make in conjunction with 
our large circulation. Also many advertisers are getting a still 
lower rate by running their ad four or more times. 

POULTRY KEEPER has not profited during the War by shoot- 
ing its prices out of the reach of the average breeder. It has 
kept it at dead rock with the result that any breeder that has 
some gobd stock is justified in using our classified columns In 
disposing of same. 

These testimonials have just come to hand which we offer 
as proof of what we have said. Here they are: 

"Enclosed find check. Please continue my classified ad. 
We cannot afford to miss an issue." 

The Fenn Bantam Yards, Delavan, Wis. 

"Am pleased to state that I am having excellent results 
from my advertising in POULTEY KEEPEE. It is the 
best investment I ever made in advertising." 

Arthur Worthington, Two Eivers, Wis, 

=*» 

"Please insert my classified ad two months. Had good 
results from the last ad." 

Mrs. Chas. Schlots, Elmwood, HI. 

"Please discontinue my classified ad in POULTEY 
KEEPEE as we are flooded with orders, having received 
88 in the last three days and we now have all the orders 
we can fill. 

Eauchs Poultry Yards, Jenera, Ohio. 

We want to solicit a classified ad for every breeder of poultry 
who has surplus stock or if you have eggs and baby chicks for 
sale. You will be surprised at the returns you receive and will 
find the investment quite profitable. 



RATES: 

Sates for Ads. Classified 
Under Proper Head- 
ings Are as Follows: 

1 month : 6c per word 

2 months 11c per word 

8 months 16c per word 

i months 20c per word 

1 year 50c per word 



$10.00 

Pays 
for a 

20 
Word 

Classified 
Ad 

1 Full 

Year 



The next four months is the time to reap your harvest from poultry advertising. 1 



SEND ORDERS AT ONCE TO POULTRY KEEPER — AD. DEPT. — QUINCY, ILL 




Price 
Reduction 




tyfE are pleased to announce 
a reduction of 25c in our 
Big Four Clubbing Offer. This 
offer has been the most popular 
club we have ever published in POULTRY KEEPER ana this spe- 
cial reduction for the coming season will mean that thousands of 
our subscribers will hasten to take advantage of it. 

You will remember the price last year was $1.25. 
This year the big offer is: 



Poultry Keeper 
Farm and Home 
Farm and Fireside 
Successful Farming 



All One Year 
—for 

$1 .00 



No matter when your subscription expires, you may 
take advantage of this offer and your time will be 
extended from the present expiration date. 



These magazines will bring you each 
month a wonderful supply of information in 
relation to Poultry, Horticulture, Dairying, 
Gardening and kindred subjects. 

They are filled with instructive, sensible 
reading matter that will help you in your 



every day work. If you take this club once 
you will always want it because it will appeal 
to you as giving so much in value for so little 
money. 

Don't forget that you will receive all four 
magazines one full year and the price is only 
$1.00. Write now before you forget, 




For Your Convenience You May Use This Coupon 

A. OTIS ARNOLD, Publisher, 

Quincy, Illinois. 

Dear Sir: Enclosed find $1.00 for which 
send me Poultry Keeper, Farm & Home, 
Farm & Fireside, and Successful Farming all 
for one year. 



B 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

i 

I 
1 



i 

s 

i 
8 

I 
I 



1 



Name 



Postoffice State 

R. R. or St 



P. S. : I am an old new subscriber 




S cent* a copy 



/jw^g^^f^ first of 




THE 




A JOURNAL FOR EVERY ONE INTERESTED 
IN MAKING POULTRY PAY DEVOTED PARTIC- 
ULARLY TO PRACTICAL POULTRY KEEPING 



Vol. XXXIX 



November, 1922 



THE BEST 

AND 
SURE WAY 



Protect your fowls from the powerful and insidious ^| 
lice and mites that suck the life-blood of 

These parasites allowed to run 
rampant in a hen house will suck 
more blood, more vitality over night 
than fowls can replace by the assimi- 
lation of large quantities of food dur- 
ing the day — think this over. 

Extra care must be taken that not 
only the birds are kept clean, but 
every crack and crevice as well. 



Licemist 



[formerly called Licecil] 

No dusting—No clipping— No painting 
— Just hang up the bottle 

— and in a few days your entire flock and hen house will he 
rid of every louse and mite. Licemist leaves the bottle in 
powerful evaporating vapors which descend in a misty form, 
penetrating feathers, cracks, and crevices everywhere. Lice 
and mites have no lungs. They breathe through the pores 
of the body. The vapors from Licemist will quickly kill 
them. They cannot stand the odor of Licemist, and its 
presence in your hen house will rid you of these pests. 

How To Use LICEMIST 

Simply put a few drops in the nest and on the roosts, hang 
the uncovered bottle in coop or hen house. The powerful 
evaporating vapors which leave the bottle descending in 
mist form penetrate cracks, crevices, everywhere. Lice, 
mites, chiggers, roaches, bed bugs, ants, etc., will be des- 
troyed by Licemist vapors. Will not injure chicks. 

GIVE IT A FAIR TRIAL 

If you prefer to fight poultry pests in the old way — it is 
certainly your privilege to do so. But your own best in- 
terest, and the success others are having, will lead you to 
give Licemist a fair, honest trial at the earliest opportunity. 

J Bottle, $1.00; 3 Bottles, $2.50; 12 Bottles, $9.00— All Postpaid. 

American Supply Company, Dept. P K Quincy, Illinois 





Chicken Mites Filled 
With the Life Blood 
of Faithful Hens. 




Evidence! 

KEEPS ON USING LICECIL. 

Please find chacks for $5 for which 
send me six bottles of Licecil. I 
have been using Licecil and find it 
O. K. This is the third order, which 
speaks for itself. 

J. D. ALLEN, Lynchburg, Va.. 

WANTS MORE. 
I am sending for some more 
Licecil. It is the best preparation 
to rid the place of lice I have ever 
found. Send as quick as possible, 
because I am all out now. 
JOHN HOLTRAP, Lynden, Wash. 

KEEPS ON USING IT. 
Find enclosed money order for 
Licecil. I was well pleased with 
results from the other bottle I 
bought. Have over 200 birds and 
when I use Licecil lice are a very 
scarce article with me. 

J. E. PLATT, Maywood, 111. 

LITTLE WORRY OR WORK. 
Please send me three bottles of 
Licecil. Like it very much. With 
Licecil there is little worry or work. 
Enclosed find money order for $2.50 
for the three bottles. 

BERNARD F. OSTERFIELD, 

Dayton, Ohio. 

SEND MORE. 
Please send me three bottles of 
Licecil. I received the one bottle 
ordered recently, and have had splen- 
did results. There is one thing sure, 
no lice or mites will stay on the 
chickens with the odor of Licecil 
about. L. G. STAYNOS, 

Sherman, Texas. 



AMERICAN SUPPLY COMPANY 

Department P K QUINCY, ILLINOIS 
Gentlemen: Enclosed please find $ for which send me 



.bottles of Licemist as soon as possible. 



Name 



THE END. 



Street 



Town 



State 



THE 




A JOURNAL FOR 
EVERYONE 
IWTERE ST E. D 



KEEPER 



IN MAKING 
POULTRY 
PAY 



Vol. XXXIX 



NOVEMBER, 1922 



No. 8 



Producing a Top-Notch Article 

By DWIGHT E. HALE 



People are more particular than 
they used to be. They have been 
catered to so much in recent years, 
and (have been so prosperous, that 
nothing but the best will satisfy 
them. If that is so, there is only 
one thing ito do and that is to give 
them what they want as long as they 
are willing to pay for it. 

Take eggs for example. Some peo- 
ple prefer a white shell egg, some a 
brown shell and some are not par- 
ticular as to color of the shell, buft 
they all want a strictly fresh egg. 

Realizing not only the above men- 
tioned facts, but also that 24 ounces 
is (the Standard weight for a dozen 
of eggs, it is up to the producer to 
see that his eggs are at least up to 
standard. Eggs smaller than 2 4 
ounces to the dozen are docked and 
also those that run too heavy, like 
eggs that run as much as 30 and 32 
ounces to the dozen. The reason for 
docking the large is that in this 
country we have but one standard 
size egg crate filler and the extra 
large eggs cause a greater breakage. 
We rave and tear our hair about the 
Chinese and the eggs they produce, 
but they go much farther than we 
Americans in sorting their eggs as too 
size, color, shape, etc., and they have 
several different size egg crate fill- 
ers to fit the eggs they are sending 
to market. There is one case where 
we can learn something from the 
Chinese. 

A few cents per dozen does not 
seem like much, but if you are pro- 
ducing eggs for market purposes and 
selling very many, it makes a big 
sum in the end and is well worth 
going after. 

Eggs are also sorted as to color, 
shape, fresh, strictly fresh, dirties, 
etc., and it behooves the producer to 
produce an egg that will grade A-l 
if he expects to get the top price for 
them. 

First we must get our eggs to 
standard size and as uniform as pos- 
sible. To do this we would start 
with our breeding stock by selecting 
those that not only lay a great many 



eggs, but also those that lay the kind 
of an egg we want; those that begin 
laying early, that is mature quickly, 
and breed from that kind of stock. 
This would soon standardize your 
flock so that in a very few years you 
could have a flock that was laying 
a uniform egg as to size, shape and 
color, and thus save a lot of time in 
grading and also have money by get- 
ting top prices. 

There is no excuse for selling stale, 
cracked and dirty eggs. This is a 
matter of gathering the eggs prompt- 
ly, keeping them in a cool place un- 
til ready to ship and in keeping the 
nests clean so that the eggs will not 
get dirty. Losses from these causes 
can be easily eliminated and they 
must be attended to if you are out to 
produce the best to be had in eggs. 

There are a few instances where 
doctors have certain patients that 
need certain mineral or chemicals 
along with eggs, and it can be put 
into the eggs by feeding the hens. 
For example hens that have plenty 
of iron in the drinking water will 
produce an egg that analyzes heavy 
in iron and this is often very de- 
sirable for certain patients and they 
are glad to pay the extra price for 
them. 

There are certain people who like 
a strongly flavored egg and eggs for 
such a trade can be flavored to suit 
the customer. Feed your hens garlic, 
for instance, and you can produce a 
very strong tasting egg. There are 
certain customers willing to pay the 
price for them and if you have any 
such on your list, cater to them and 
give them what they are willing to 
pay for. 

If you are raising any of the Med- 
iterranean breeds like the Leghorns, 
Minorcas, Blue Andalusians or An- 
conas that lay a white shell egg you 
will, of course, seek a market that 
pays a premium for a white egg. New 
York heads the list as a market pre- 
ferring the White egg, and Boston 
prefers a brown egg and each will 
pay a small premium to get wlhat 
they want. There are many cities 
where there is no distinction, but in 



those cities individuals that are par- 
ticular and who will pay the price to 
get What they want. 

Nearly everybody likes to eat 
chicken in some form or other, and 
after they get their fill of same they 
become more particular. In such 
cases find out what they want and 
cater to them,. Too many fries are 
dumped on the market without any 
special conditioning. Many breeders 
claim it does not pay to fatten them. 
It does. There are probably more 
Leghorn cockerels put on the mar- 
ket than any other breed. It is hard 
rtio fatten a Leghorn. They will not 
stand crate feeding like those of a 
heavier breed as they are of a more 
or less nervous disposition and if 
confined in a crate seem to fret off 
the weight faster than one can feed 
it on. The best way to condition 
them for market is to confine them 
in a small enclosure that is large 
enough to admit their moving about 
a little and then feed three times a 
day, just what they will clean up in 
fifteen minutes, a good fattening ra- 
tion mixed with milk, or one that 
contains the dried milk. In this 
manner you can put on the market 
a milk-fed chick that will not only 
carry more weight and a softer, bet- 
ter finish, but one that will bring 
more money per pound. 

In conditioning any of the heavier 
breeds such as Orpingtons, Brahmas, 
Rocks, Wyandottes, R. I. Reds, etc., 
it is best to confine them in a crate 
so they cannot move about. Keep 
these crates rather dark. Feed three 
times a day a good milk ration, just 
what they will clean up in fifteen 
minutes. If any remains after that 
time, remove it or they will gorge 
themselves and not be hungry for 
the next feed. Follow this line of 
feeding for two weeks or' a little less, 
and you will be surprised at the 
gains in weight and improvement in 
the meat. 

The close confinement breaks 
down the muscular tissue and it is 
replaced with tender, juicy meat and 
fat that makes them the finest ar- 
ticle of meat that can be put on the 



Page Number 4 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



table and people will pay the price 
for it. 

This crate fattening applies to 
poultry at any stage of growth you 
wish to market them, and the im- 
provement is probably more notice- 
able in old birds than in (the real 
voung ones. 

One branch of the business that 
many poultry raisers are overlook- 
ing is that of caponizing. If you have 
the room to carry over any surplus 
males, caponize them and hold them 
until about February or March and 
then crate fatten them and put on 
the market. They ought to bring 
you around 55c a pound and of 
course will weigh more. We say 
hold until February or March as the 
holiday market generally uses up the 
supply of fowls in cold storage and 
also those that are shipped in from 
the farms during that season. They 
are scarce, the demand is good and 
the price high for them. Do not 
get the idea that a capon must be 
a great big bird. Most of the city 
families run not more than four or 
five people and they want a fowl 
that dresses around 7 or 8 pounds. 
The larger birds will find a market 
perhaps at some of the restaurants, 
hotels, clubs, etc., but are not in 
such good demand as a family fowl. 
All these little extra attentions pay. 
It is the extra quarter of a pound 
here and there and the little extra 
price per pound that make the real 
profits. It is this extra finish and 
price that puts your goods a little 
above the ordinary and creates a de- 
mand for them. 

If you are more interested in the 
baby chick business or the breed- 
ing of fancy fowls than you are in 
the market end of the business.you 
will find many little special things 
that can be done that will bring you 
an extra price. 

Speaking of baby chicks, in our 
opinion, the business has grown so 
fast and everybody wanting or sell- 
ing baby chicks that many have be- 
come a little careless as to the grade 
of chicks they send out. From now 
on it is the hatchery that produces 
the best chicks that is going to do 
the big business. 

The State of Wisconsin has made 
a great move in puttng on State In- 
spectors. These inspectors visit 
flocks, cull them as to egg produc- 
ing qualities, health, stamina, con- 
ditions, etc. The hatchery that can 
advertise chicks from an inspected 
flock is going to have a big advan- 
tage over the one that is just sell- 
ing chicks. 

More care is going to be taken 
of the breeding flock that produces 
the eggs for the hatcheries and it 
is going to result in stronger, better 
chicks. Many large hatcheries that 
buy their eggs from various flocks 
are engaging experienced breeders 
whose duty it is to visit these flocks 
and do the mating for them. 

Were I in the baby chick business 
I would surely make it a point to 
see that the breeding flocks that 
supplied the eggs for my hatchery 
were in good condition, mated cor- 
rectly and properly taken care of. I 
could get more for my chicks be- 
cause they would be found to be 
better and there would be a greater 
demand for them. 



As for the fancy end of the bus- 
iness. The American people like to 
buy from a winner. In starting I 
would start with a pair or trio, the 
best I could buy, rather than to try 
and start with a large flock. I would 
study the standard requirements of 
them and cull closely making my 
matings so as to produce as close to 
the Standard as possible. Then when 
I got them good, I would show them 
at the poultry shows and make a 
show record and then let people 
know about it. I would strive all 
the time to produce a little better 
bird than my competitor and when 
you have done that you will find a 
demand for your stock and eggs that 
will bring you a little extra price. 

Again we say it is the little extras 
here and there that make the big 
profits in the end. Also it is the 
attention to the little extra neces- 
sities that make these extra prices 
and profits. 

Breeders are prone to slack up 
during the hot weather. They let 
the half grown stock shift for itself. 
The result is a set back; stock does' 
not develop as it should ; it costs 
more to mature them and they are 
not as good when they are n\atured. 
In the market end of the business, 
the birds should be pushed for all 
they will stand so as to get them on 
the market with the least work and 
in the shortest time. The man who 
has broilers or garden truck a week 
ahead of his competitors gets the top 
prices. 

Lice and mites like warm weather 
and multiply rapidly. A chick can- 
not support a lot of lice and mites 
and keep growing as it should. 

It is the little things that make 
big profits — do not forget that nor 
neglect them. 

Next month we shall tell you 
something about finding a market 
for your goods. 



"SMOKE 'EM" 



Over two hundred thousand poul- 
trymen and farmers scattered 
throughout the United States and 
Canada now use and recommend 
"SMOKE EM," canned smoke the 
GUARANTEED ROUP CURE, the 
most scientific DRUGLESS ROUP 
CURE ever discovered. 

This preparation is easy and safe 
to use. Eliminates catching and 
handling each individual fowl. The 
cost is approximately 1-4 cent per 
fowl. 

A severe and prolonged cold is us- 
ually the beginning of roup, canker, 
diptheria, and chickenpox. Like in 
human beings a severe cold will in 
time develop into pneumonia. But a 
human being can expel mucous gath- 
ered from a cold, thereby elimina- 
ting any chance of accumulation 
which is dangerous and if this 
mucous is not expelled will bring 
about a quinzy sore throat. With 
poultry it is quite different. The 
poor fowls cannot blow their nose 
like a human being can in order to 
dislodge and discharge this mucous 
which occurs when they catch cold. 
This results in an accumulation of 
mucous Which becomes hard and 
forms a cheesy-like substance, ac- 
companied with high temperature 



and hard lumps form under the eyes 
and patches of canker in the mouth 
and wind-pipe. When the nostrils 
become clogged the tear socket which 
connects with the eyes and nostrils, 
become inflamed and this mucous is 
carried to the eyes. Then after the 
eyes fill up the mouth and wind pipe 
become filled with canker and death 
is usually caused by strangulation. 

It is indeed a pitiful sight for one 
to see his valued birds affected with 
this deadly contagious disease and 
through his love for poultry and to 
eliminate the great financial loss, 
Mr. H. M. Spahr, President of the 
H. M. Spahr, Breeding Estate, of 
Thurmont, Maryland, who is one of 
the most determined men I ever 
knew, instructed the manager of his 
poultry department on his large 
breeding estate where he breeds reg- 
istered Holstein cattle, Berkshire 
hogs and his famous Nonesuch Trap- 
nested Leghorn chickens and also 
engaged one of the best known chem- 
ists in New York City to assist him 
in the discovery of a genuine reli- 
able roup cure. 

For several years they worked and 
spent large sums of money, before 
they invented "SMOKE EM." As 
the name applies, "SMOKE EM." As 
a scientific process of smoke, and 
when this smoke is administered to 
fowls in large volumes it is impos- 
sible for a human being to Stay in 
the poultry house unless they have 
a cold. I would advise anyone hav- 
ing a cold, to have a handkerchief 
ready, for he will surely need it, if 
he stays in the poultry house when 
"SMOKE EM" is being used. 

Now I am not going to try to ex- 
plain the action and the way 
"SMOKE EM" produces a positive 
cure in medical terms or high-brow 
language, for Mr. Spahr is a believer 
of plain words. As previously ex- 
plained a chicken cannot blow its 
nose without the use of "SMOKE 
EM." But it is absolutely necessary 
for a chicken to breathe and, it will 
breathe the natural way through its 
nostrils if nothing interferes, there- 
fore "SMOKE EM" should be ad- 
ministered. 

Here is the beginning of roup. A 
cold develops. The nostrils gradually 
become clogged, forcing the mucous 
from the nostrils down the windpipe 
forming canker, and also forcing the 
mucous between the tear-socket and 
eye. 

When the fumes of "SMOKE EM" 
are inhaled, these fumes find their 
way into the nostrils and wind-pipe, 
mouth and tear-socket and to the 
eyes, directly where medical atten- 
tion is needed. It will leave a dark 
deposit of its medical proprieties on 
the diseased parts, healing the af- 
fected parts and disinfecting as well 
as killing the diseased germs, not 
only on the fowls, but, in every nooK 
and corner in the entire poultry 
building. After these germs are 
killed they are harmless and easily 
expelled by the fowls themselves. 

"SMOKE EM," should be used 
once a month as a preventative. This 
truly wonderful roup cure and pre- 
ventative is simple and easily used. 
An entire flock regardless of size can 
be treated in thirty to forty min- 
ues. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 5 




"Powerful and Satisfactory 
Advertising Medium' ' 

Stockton, N. J., June 20, 1922 

The Country Gentleman, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gentlemen: We take this opportunity of expressing our appreciation of 
the satisfactory manner in which you handled our ads this season. We also 
wish to state that this Hatchery has advertised in all leading farm and poultry 
magazines during the past thirty years, and we have yet to find a more powerful 
and satisfactory advertising medium than The Country Gentleman. 
We shall increase our order next season. 

Yours respectfully, 
THE PINE TREE HATCHERY, 

( Signed) Jos. D. Wilson, Prop. 

For more than thirty years Mr. Wilson has been hatching Baby Chicks and advertising 
them in all the leading farm and poultry journals, but, to use Mr. Wilson's own words, he 
"has yet to find a more powerful and satisfactory advertising medium than THE COUN- 
TRY Gentleman." 

What The Country Gentleman has done for Mr. Wilson it can do for other 
poultrymen. Its more than 750,000 readers make up the most influential buying group 
in American agriculture. The special poultry rate in THE COUNTRY GENTLEMAN is 
$2.00 a line. Send for rate card and sample copy. 

93?e COUNTRY 
GENTLEMAN 

The Curtis Publishing Company, Independence Square, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
The Country Gentleman The Saturday Evening Post The Ladies' Home Journal 



Page Number 6 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



POULTRY KEEPER 

Quincy, Illinois 
401 Hampshire Street 
A Journal for Everyone Interested in Making 
Poultry Pay. 
Issued the First of Each Month 

Subscription Price: 
50c a year; Single Copies, 5c 
Foreign Postage: Twenty-five Cents a Tear 
Additional 



Entered at the Quincy, 111., Post Office as 
Second Class Matter. 

Remittances should be made by Draft. Money 
Order, Express Order or Registered Letters. 
Small sums will be accepted in United States 
one or two cent postage stamps. 

Change of address — When this is desired, be 
sure to give old and new Post Office addresses. 

All subscriptions invariably discontinued at 
expiration. Subscribers will confer a favor by 
reporting to us irregularities in receiving the 
Poultry Keeper. 

Advertising rates made known on application. 

Poultry Keeper readers are cordially invited 
to express their opinion on any subject of 
poultry that well be of interest to our readers, 
give helpful talks to the inexperienced and ask 
questions in any department. 

A. OTIS ARNOLD, Editor. 

F. RAYMOND BENSON, Ass't Editor. 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MAN- 
AGEMENT, CIRCULATION, ETC., of the 
Poultry Keeper published monthly at Quincy, 
Illinois, required by Act of Congress of Aug- 
ust 2-i, 1912. 

Publisher, A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, 111. 

Editor, A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, 111. 

Managing Editor, A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, 111. 

Business Manager, A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, 
111. 

Owner, A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, nil. 

Known bondholders, mortgagees, and other 
security holders, holding one per cent or more 
of the total- amount of bonds, mortgages or 
other security. NONE. 

(Signed) A. OTD3 ARNOLD. 

Sworn and Subscribed to before me this 2nd 
day of Oct., 1922. 

C. R. WARREN, 

Notary Public 
My Commission expires May 18, 1924. 



THANKSGIVING COMES 
AGAIN 

Thanksgiving comes but once each 
year and to many it is simply a time 
-when the table groans with good 
things to eat but we are glad to 
note that to the majority it has 
a deeper meaning. Thanksgiving 
should mean much to us as individ- 
uals and as a people. 

With the close of the World War 
many thought that we had especial 
cause to be thankful but in these 
trying days we learn that we still 
have even more reason to give 
thanks for. Stop and think of the 
hunger and want, the hate and dis- 
trust, the desire for revenge and the 
destruction which is present in other 
parts of the world, we must show a 
greater thanksgiving for the real 
brotherhood which is present in 
America. 

Thanksgiving may mean a well 
laden table but above all let us 
strive to continue the friendship and 
brotherly love which we have and 
let us leave no stone unturned which 
will prove a means to that end. 
America is not perfect but it is so 
far ahead of the rest of the world 
that we have just cause to celebrate 
a very happy Thanksgiving for 1922. 



ARTIFICIAL LIGHT 

Back a few years or perhaps a few 
months ago we heard a great deal 
regarding the value of artificial 
lights when used in the laying house. 
Personally we never lost much sleep 
over this end of the game and we 
now see many poultrymen who 



while enthusiastic about lights at 
the start, admit that they now use 
them with moderation. 

We believe that artificial lights 
are a help but we refuse to be carried 
away by over enthusiastic reports. 

Lights can be used to advantage 
and this is an excellent time to see 
that ithey are installed for the short 
days which are to come, for if you 
contemplate using them at all you 
will want them soon. 

When used in moderation and 
with the proper degree of judgment 
lights can be made to return a good 
profit but never loose sight of the 
fact that it may become a mere fad 
and perhaps become a detriment to 
your flock. Some writers would al- 
most make you believe that artificial 
lights is a late discovery. The writer 
has personal knowledge of their hav- 
ing been used ait least twenty years 
ago. They proved useful then as 
they will now when judgment is the 
rule and guide of your life. 



CROSSING BREEDS DOES 
NOT PAY 

A very large per cent of those who 
keep poultry today raise only 
thoroughbred stock. They know 
from experience that the best pays 
more in a financial way and also in 
the satisfaction which comes from 
owning carefully bred birds. 

Occasionally some amateur will 
break forth with a cross of two 
Standard breeds and try to improve 
on what has taken a life time to 
produce. Success may seem to re- 
ward his efforts during the first gen- 
eration but the second year always 
finds a witness for his folly. Cross- 
ing breeds is a certain road to ruin 
and you will loose both good breeds. 
Many experienced poultrymen have 
found the foolishness of crossing 
breeds and surely those of limited 
experience cannot hope to accomplish 
what our foremost breeders fail to 
do. 

There is no such thing as luck in 
crossing of different -breeds. Failure 
is waiting up the road and you can- 
not afford to flirt with such a fellow 
as failure. 

Let us stick to our time and test- 
ed breeds and not experiment with 
the crossing of breeds. 



IT PAYS TO GET 
ADVICE 

In the city of Chicago there lived 
a man Who dreamed of an acre out 
in the country where his family 
could brealthe air free from dust and 
smoke, where the garden would 
flourish and the hens would supply 
the family with fresh eggs. 

As far as the dream was concerned 
it was excellent and then one day 
the happy man began to construct a 
poultry house out in the country and 
then he made a fatal mistake. He 
buillt the house facing west instead 
of south. Had he been a reader of 
POULTRY KEEPER he would have 
known of our Question and Answer 
Department and could have obtained 
advice which would have put him 
right on this matter. He has fought 
failure for several years and does 
not even yet realize that his venture 
is doomed. Probably he will go back 
to the city a discouraged man when 



had he known of the help we could 
have given he might have been suc- 
cessful. 

It pays to get good advice and 
follow it. Every reader of POUL- 
TRY KEEPER has the privilege of 
asking questions of our Question and 
Answer Department and you owe it 
to yourself to get the best and most 
reliable help possible. 

Tell your friends about the advice 
we offer and don't let any of your 
friends make a mistake in the poul- 
try business. Our Mr. Benson is 
kept busy answering questions but 
he always has time to study your 
problem and will tell you frankly 
just what is best. 



EDUCATING JUDGES 

The poultry fraternity may well 
congratulate itself on the high stand- 
ard of the men who have acted as 
poultry judges in the past. As a 
whole they have been honest, liberal, 
high-minded men with a broad vis- 
ion of their profession. It has been 
fortunate that such was the case but 
it has been more the result of acci- 
dent than anything else. 

What does the future hold in 
store ? 

We admit that we have been lucky 
in the past but shall we go on trust- 
ing to luck? Does such a program 
seem in keeping with American ef- 
ficiency? Just because we have had 
luck in the past is no reason to ex- 
pect it in the future. 

Judges must have a certain 
amount of knowledge in order to 
make a success and why should not 
the American Poultry Association 
provide a school to impart this 
knowledge? The haphazard way of 
the past will not do for the future. 
We must have thoroughly efficient 
judges and our breeders are getting 
the poultry business down to such 
fine points that we must have better 
judges. Will the American Poultry 
Association supply these judges or 
will we go to other quarters for 
them? 



BUY A POULTRY FARM 

The writer has been encouraging 
the Little Lander, the Back Lotter, 
in fact all who have shown a real 
desire to get away from the drudg- 
ery of city life, to buy a farm. We 
have found many pleasant exper- 
iences as a result and many requests 
for advice regarding the venture, if 
it may be called such. 

We strongly recommend that a 
man who contemplates moving on a 
small poultry farm, should keep 
sone chickens, even if in a small 
way, before making such a change. 
It is imperative that one have some 
practical experience with poultry. 
Perhaps the labor necessary may not 
be at all congenial and it is much 
better to learn this fact before going 
out upon a farm. 

We assume that practically all the 
readers of POULTRY KEEPER are 
now keeping poultry in a limited way 
and wish to branch out where there 
is room and opportunity to conduct 
a real business. 

Farms in most localities can now 
be purchased at reasonable figures 
and we predict that poultry products 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Nmber 7 



will go higher, so that it seems a 
very good time to buy a poultry 
farm. But don't go in blind. Simp- 
ly because a smooth talking, velvet 
tongued salesman tells you he has 
the best buy — don't bite. Look over 
the advantages and disadvantages — 
know the whole matter. Many items 
enter into the purchase of a farm 
and you must be well posted to buy 
with intelligence. 



LOCATION IS IMPORTANT 

During these days of rapid trans- 
portation it would seem that one 
could locate a poultry farm at some 
distance from the city and yet the 
reverse is the case. Fifty to one 
hundred miles is considered far 
enough as freight and express is also 
to be considered. 

Assuming that one desires to ship 
to some large market he will no 
doubt use express service. However 
should he plan to sell to a local trade 
he must see to it that the roads are 
in good condition at all times of the 
year. An auto will prove much more 
useful than a horse and wagon as it 
will save so much in time, but it re- 
quires that the roads be kept in good 
shape. Speaking of an auto brings 
to mind the opportunity of selling 
eggs directly to the customer. This 
involves extra expense but is wortn 
considering. 

If the road is in good repair one 
will find many autos will pass and 
repass the premises. If a suitable 
sign be placed near the road it will 
be the means of bringing much trade 
for eggs. 

In the purchase of a farm bear in 
mind these different points as lo- 
cation is often the turning point be- 
tween success and failure. 

Do not forget to secure a location 
where the family may find pleasant 
relations with the neighbors. While 
we must be practical in the selection 
of a farm yet we must remember 
that one cannot live by bread alone. 
Companionship has much in our way 
of living and we must have neigh- 
bors who are pleasant and agreeable. 

Barred Rock 

Baby Chicks 

And All Other Standard Varieties. 

I make a specialty of Barred Rock chicks and 
I can guarantee my customers that they will 
be more than satisfied if they order chix from 
me, as I keep nothing but the choicest of 
birds in my flocks, and they are culled each 
year for high egg production. Every customer 
ordering- from me must be satisfied or money 
will be cheerfully refunded. Barred Bock 
chicks $16.50 per hundred. 

FRED YTJNKER, Dakota, Illinois 




Chas. Rowe says: 
der/' Thousands 
"freight prepaid" 
you buy fencing. 
It will pay you big. 
lowest. Send for Jim 
Brown Fence & Wire 



I saved $60.00 on my or- 
doingsame. Get our low 
special cut prices before 

gates, roofing or paint. 

Onr quality hichest — prices 
Brown's cut price catalog (6) 
Co., Dept. B57 Cleveland, Ohio 




Not Laying? Its 
Your Own Fault! 

Hens and pullets should be laying right 
now. 

If you're not getting a profitable egg 
yield from your flock it's a reasonably 
safe bet that you are to blame. 

Probably you have not supplied the one 
thing that will help change them from 
loafers to layers — 

Pratts Poultry Regulator 

The action of its health-building ingredients is 
entirely natural. It invigorates the whole system 
■ — puts hens in condition to lay — aids in digesting 
their food — rouses and strengthens the inactive 
egg-organs. That means EGGS — now and all 
winter. Such is the testimony of thousands of 
poultrymen who know. Take a tip from them — ■ 
make a test — we take the risk — you 
can't lose. Sold by Pratt Dealers every- 
where on this Guarantee: — 

"Your Money Back If YOU Are Not Satisfied" 

PRATT FOOD COMPANY 

Philadelphia, Pa, Hammond, Ind. Toronto, Can. 



PRATTS SI & YEAR OF SERVICE 



PURE WATER AS NATURE 
PROVIDES 



Abont every so often our Question 
and Answer Department receives an 
inquiry regarding the use of some 
chemical which will insure the wa- 
ter being free from germs. Where 
the water is not good this may be 
done but when pure water can be 
obtained it is much better than try- 
ing to dope impure stuff. 

The need of pure water is appar- 
ent when it is understood that an 
egg is two-thirds water. When 
fresh, clean water is provided it is 
wonderful the amount that a few 
hens will drink in a day. The fact 
of the matter in a few words is that 
the- egg production is very much af- 
fected by the kind and amount of 
water which is given to the hens. 

Clean out the dishes and keep 
them filled with pure water — just as 
it comes from the well. This may 
seem like a rather unimportant item 
but if you will give it your atten- 
tion you may be surprised to see 
your egg yield begin to grow. 



Quality first, price second; this 
is a good rule when buying seed — 
or anything else. 



5— Good— $| 
Magazines JL 

Woman's World, (Monthly) \ Our Price 

Good Stories, (Monthly) f/p- swt 

American Woman, P° ntU y>/3)X.UU 
The Household, (MontIlly H ALL FIVE 
The Farm Journal, (Monthly)/ F0R | YEAR 

ORDER BY CLUB NUMBER 52 

A Dollar Bill will do— We take the risk 

Send all orders to 

WhitEock & Suramarhays 

25 North Dearborn Street, CHICAGO 



Poultry Leg Bands 

THE "BEST YET" ALUMINUM. 
Not colored. Will stay on. 12.20c: 
25. 30c: 50. 50c; 100. 90c. Stat* 
breed. 

CELLULOID SPIRAL BANDS. 
Red. Green, Amber, Pink. Black, 
White, Yellow. Purple. Light Blue. 
Dark Blue, Ruby, Cerise. 




atzcior 12 25 50 100 250 500 

Baby Chieks. Pigeons.. $.10 S.20 $.35 » .60 $1.25 $2.25 

R™inrr.li.l,. is 30. .40 .75 1.75 3.00 

.35 .50 .90 2.00 3.50 

.40 .60 1.00 2.25 4.00 

.45 .75 1.20 2.75 5.00 

10 .85 1.40 3.25 6.00 



Growing Chicks 15 

Leghorns, Anconas. . .20 

Rocks, Reds, etc 20 

Asiatics 25 

Turkeys, Geese. . . . . . .30 



Al 



uminum Marker Works, Dept. 13 Beaver Falls, Pa. 



Page Number 8 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



ROUP 



It's choking to death thousands 
of chickens a day. You know the 
symptoms — face swollen, running at 
eyes and nose, comb pale, whistle or 
sneeze when breathing, catarrhal odor. 
When it attacks your flock — 

Stop It Quick with 

Conkegs 

Roup Remedy 

Just put it in the drinking water — chickens doc- 
tor themselves. Also use it for prevention; 

Conkey's Poultry Tonic 

Keeps Hens Healthy-Gets Winter Eggs 

It is a Regulator, Laying Tonic, Moulting Pow- 
der and Chick Conditioner of the highest type. 
No cayenne pepper— no filler. 
Conkey's Poultry Book is worth 60c to any 
poultryman. Sent for 6c stamps. 

THE G. E. CONKEY CO. 

6542 Broadway Cleveland, Ohio 



0«) 




Reliable Standard 
INCUBATOR 



incubator that has taken more prizes througho 
world than any other is safest and best to buy. We 
a full line of poultry appliances and equipment, 
originators of the STANDARD BLUE FLAME 
OIL HEATED COLONY HOVERS, also coal Brood- 
ers, all backed by our money back guarantee. 
Write Qs for Catalogue. 
Our Dealers Everywhere. 
Reliable Incubator and Rrooder Co. 
Box 15 Quincy, III. 



Keipper sl° P %U% 



For years they have been the standard. 
Keipper Collapsible All Wire Coops increase your 
chances to win at Fairs and Shows. Used by 
nearly all up-to-date shows last year. Shipping 
Coops with automatic lock sliding top. Egg 
Carriers that guarantee absolute safety for 
shipments of hatching eggs. Feeder Boies 
troughs, drinkingf ountains-handiest and most 
sanitary made. Trap Nests of galvanized iron 
with wire trap front. Most practical made. 
Last a lifetime. Canary hatching and shelf cages. 
Writ* Vraa Rnnlr of P° ult ry specialties. Tells how 
for 1 ,ee *»UUIV to condition birds for shows. 

Keipper Cooping Co., Inc. 
1401 First St. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Branches: Johnstown, N. 7. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
■T Kansas City, llo. 





Poultry Leg Bands 

Colored Leader Adjustable, fit 

anything from bantam to goose, 
numbered consecutively, Red, Blue, 
Green, Yellow, Pink. 
100, $1.50; 50, $1.00; 25, 60c. 

Heavy Aluminum, _ numbered 
consecutively, large raised figures, 
millions havebeen sold, adjustable 
for any size bird, will stay on. 
100, 60c; 50. 35c; 25, 20c. 
Celluloid Spiral, 10 colors, 
Red, Green, Garnet, Black, 
White, Pink, Yellow, Purple, 
Light Blue and Dark Blue. 

25 60 100 260 600 
No. 1 Brahman Giants etc.. .$.45 $.75 $1.20 $2.75 $5.00 

No. 2 Rocks Reds etc.' .40 .60 1.00 2.25 4.00 

No. 3 Lsehoms, Anconas, etc. . .35 .50 .90 2.00 3.50 
Prices are postpaid. State color and breed. 

Eureka Supply House Box K, Mount Morris, III. 






































i. ~ .. .. 




■ y * 


- • %i 




- . 1 ■• ; Mil 




COURTESY U.S. BUREAU OF CHEMISTRY 



gg showing "blood ring" — before 
the candle and out of the shell. 



Cracked egg invaded by mold — be- 
fore the candle and out of the shell. 





V 



COURTESY U.S. BUREAU Of CHEMISTRY 



White rot or addled egg — before the 
candle and out of the shell. 

CLASSIFIED DESCRIPTION 
OF EGGS 



Eg* 



white a green white — before the 
candle and out of the shell. 



The different types of eggs found 
in commerce may be classified ac- 
cording to edibility and possibility 
of detection by candling as follows: 
Fresh Egg — Before Candle 

Air space: Not enlarged; less than 
three-sixteen/th inch in depth. 

White: Firm, clear. Yolk: Dimly 
seen through white as shadowy ob- 
ject indistinct in outline. Chick 
spot not visible. 



Distinguishing characteristics: No 
shrinkage and general firm condition 
of white and yolk. 

Out of Shell. White: Firm, thick; 
opalescent; reflects light. 

Yolk: Spherical, firm; chick spot 
small, no sign of hatching. Color 
uniform for entire yolk, but varies 
from light yellow to deep orange, 
and is occasionally olive green. 

Distinguishing characteristics: Gen- 
eral firm condition of white and 
yolk. White, opalescent. 



Illustrations furnished for this article through courtesy of Marketing Bulletin of the 
State Marketing- Bureau of Missouri. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 9 




A fresh egg before the candle and Slightly stale egg showing incuba- 
and out of the shell. tion — before the candle and 

out of the shell. 




Stale egg showing a settled, flat- 
tened yolk with a thin white — before 
the candle and out of shell. 



Slightly Stale Egg — Before 
the Candle. 

Air cell: Fairly enlarged, distinct 
separation of membranes. 

than in fresh 



White : Less firm 
egg, but not thin. 

Yolk: Movable 
tated before light. 

Distinguishing 
Slightly enlarged air cell, 
some thinness of white. 



when egg is ro- 
slightly flattened, 
characteristics : 
showing 



Egg with yolk beginning to adhere 
to shell — before the candle and out 
of the shell. 



Out of the Shell: White: Shows 
some weakness, but slightly reflects 
light. Yolk: Somewhat flattened but 
usually clear. 

Distinguishing characteristics: 

Fairly thin white, somewhat flat- 
tened yolk. 

Stale Egg — Before Candle. 
Air space: Enlarged; lower wall may 
be movable in outline. 
White: Thin, clear. 



160 Hens 
Earn $1392.67 



96-page Free Book Explains How 
to Break Records for 
Winter Eggs. 



Would you like to make a net 
profit of from $6 to $10 per year 
from each hen? Less than an acre 
of ground will take care of 200 hens, 
and will therefore yield a net profit 
of from $1,000 to $2,000 a year. 

Less feed and more profit, more 
eggs from the same number of hens 
is the secret of success. Why fool 
with loafers and boarders when with 
simple methods you can have hens 
that lay like Lady Victory, good for 
200 to 304 eggs in twelve months. 

Every reader of this paper should 
immediately write Prof. Quisenberry 
for his 9 6-page Free Book, "Dollars 
and Sense in the Poultry Business." 
Over 4 6,000 successful Poultry Rais- 




ers in the United States, Canada and 
20 foreign lands are making money 
the "Quisenberry Way." This book 
explains in understandable language 
these simple secrets of rearing, 
breeding and feeding for big egg 
yield. 

Write Today for free Boook 

Prof. T. E. Quisenberry, Dean of the Amer- 
ican Poultry School, Dept. 4019, Kansas City, 
Ho., -will be pleased to send you a free copy 
of his wonderful book "Dollars and Sense in 
the Poultry Business," until the books are all 
given away. Don't send any money. Just drop 
a postcard now before it is too late. This 
book outlines Prof. Quisenberry' s methods of 
culling the non-layers, how to cut down your 
feed bill, how to feed hens to double your 
egg yield, how to avoid disease besides much 
other valuable information worth many dollars 
to any poultry raiser. Prof. Quisenberry is 
officially recognized as one of the world's 
greatest poultry authorities and most success- 
ful poultry farmers. 

Get the real secrets of poultry success. 
Don't guess. Get the facts and make sure 
of big egg profits. 46,000 men and women 
have proved the "Quisenberry Way" the prof- 
itable way. Send for this free book right now. 



Cured Her 

Rheumatism 

Knowing the terrible experience the suffer- 
ing caused by rheumatism, Mrs. J. E. Hurst, 
who Uves at 608 E. Douglas Street, C-9 
Bloomington, 111., is so thankful at having cured 
herself that out of pure gratitude she is anx- 
ious to tell all other sufferers just how to get 
rid of their torture by a simple way at home. 

Mrs. Hurst has nothing to sell. Merely mail 
your own name and address, and she will gladly 
send you this valuable information entirely 
free. Write her at once before you forget. 



MAKE UP A CLUB 

Make up a club of your own, choosing the 
papers or magazines you want to take. Write 
and let me quote a special cut price. I can 
save you considerable money on your subscrip- 
tions. A. Otis Arnold, Qulncy, Illinois. 



Page Number 10 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Yolk: Definite in outline; some- 
times weak, may occasionally have 
dark, mottled areas. 

Distinguishing characteristics. 
Enlarged air cell and increased con- 
trast between white and yolk as com- 
pared with fresh egg. Edible. 

Occurance: Among eggs not 
marked promptly. 

Out of Shell. White: Thin; no 
opalescence; does not reflect light as 
much as does fresh egg. 

Yolk: Flattened and occasionally 
may have light mottled areas. 

Distinguishing characteristics: 
Thin white and flattened yolk. 
Yolk Slightly Stuck to Shell — 
Before Candle. 

Air space: Enlarged; lower wall 
may be movable in outline. 

White: Thin may be streaked with 
yellow if yolk sac is ruptured. 

Yolk: Attached to shell by small 
area of yolk sac; waves when egg is 
turned; as yolk sac is weak, it fre- 
quently may be found to be ruptured 
with contents flowing into white, or 
twisting during candling may tear 
yolk from shell, when appearance 
before candle will be similar to that 
of a mixed rot. Occasionally if yolk 
has begun to stick to shell turning 
egg in front of candle may free yolk 
without breaking its sac, when it is 
graded as a good egg. 

Distinguishing characteristic: 
The sticking of the yolk by a small 
area so that it sways easilv when 



If Ruptured 
Try This Free 



Apply it to Any Rupture, Old or Re- 
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you what is the use of wearing supports all 
your life? Why suffer tlus nuisance? Why 
run the risk of gangrene and such danger's 
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JferesU/ie Qmn Sprouter You Wmt 



30 Day's Trial— Money Back if Not Satisfied II 

Here's the grain sprouter that exactly meets the re-^ 
quirements of every poultryman. Whether you have 
a flock of 50 chickens or several thousand there's a 
style and size of 

WISCONSIN, 




SECTIONAL GRAIN SPROUTER 



to meet your needs — you add extra sec- 
tions as you need them.Wisconsin Grain 
Sprouters, like the famous 
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with thick sheets of 
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Converts one bushel of 



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Sold on 30 day's trial. Write for free catalog— learn how 
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our prices are than others. We pay freight — don't buy untr 
you get our catalog. We can save you money. 

WISCONSIN INCUBATOR CO., Dept. 34_ RACINE, WIS. 



Read 
These Letters: 

Wisconsin Incubator Co. 
Rarme Wis. 

Purchased a "Wisconsin 
Sprouter" from you last 
fall and wish to say that it 
certainly has given me amaz- 
ing results. A flock of 
chickens without one of 
your sprouters is not 
plete as well as un- 
profitable. 

E. L. Lambert, 
Driftwood, Okla. 




Wis. Incubaior Co. 
Racine, Wis. 
I wouldn't be with- 
out my Wisconsin 
Grain Sprouter, as 
tender green sprouts 
keep my chickens 
healthy and doubles 
egg yield. Get more 
eggs in winter when 
the price is high than 
at any other time. 

Mrs. Joe Denton, 



egg is turned. Inedible. 

Occurance: Very common in sum- 
mer and autumn. 

Out of Shell. White: Thin, clear 
or may be streaked with yellow if 
yolk is broken. 

Yolk: If whole in shell it is 
broken when egg is opened, leav- 
ing a yellow mark on the shell at 
place of contact. If yolk was both 
struck and broken in shell it will 
have appearance of a mixed rot when 
removed from shell. If yolk was 
very lightly struck it might drop out 
of shell without breaking in which 
case egg would be classed as good. 

Distinguishing characteristic : 
A broken yolk and a yellow mark 
on shell where yolk is stuck. 
Egg With Blood Ring — 
Before Candle. 

Air space: Large or small. 

White: Thin and clear. 

Yolk: A distinct reddish glow on 
one side of the yolk in which is seen 
a blood ring or portion of ring. 

Distinguishing characteristic : 

Presence of blood in region show- 
ing reddish glow. Inedible. 

Occurance: During warm weather 
or hatching season. 

Out of Shell. White: Thin and 
clear. 

Yolk: Germinal spot enlarged and 
surrounded by complete or partial 
blood ring; yolk flattened and often 
very weak. 

Distinguishing characteristics: 

Blood ring on yolk. 
Moldy Egg — Before Candle. 

Air space: Enlarged; lower out- 
line may be movable. 

White and yolk: Mold shows as 
black or grayish area inside shell. 
If egg is damaged the growth follows 
the line of the crack. The growth 
may be confined to the shell, in 
which case the contents of the egg 
will appear normal ; or it may be in 
the air cell or the white, in which 
case its presence is detected by dark- 
colored patches; or it may extend to 
the yolk, which in this stage is 
heavily attached to the shell and 
covered with dark spots. In an ad- 
vanced stage of mold growth the 
whole egg may appear black. 



No guess 

wofK 

wiih a 



P 




' Did you get just 
a thermometer with 
your incubator or was 
it a Tycos? 



If a Tyeos your incubator manufac- 
turer has given you quality. 



Ask for 
Knowing," 



'Incubator Facts Worth 



Taylor Instrument Companies 



KIT SE LM AN F ENCE 



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writes C. A. Dunn, Mill- 
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save by buying direct at 
Lowest Factory Prices. 

WE PAY THE "FREIGHT. 

Write today for Free 100-page 
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KITSELMAN BROS. Dept. 229 MUNCIE, IND. 




HAWK SET 



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that are taking your poultry or 
your money returned. Price COc. Anthony 
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The Whitney Poultry FarmJdcI 



Marlborough, NewYork. 



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varieties. Breeding stock henB 
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Free 32-page catalog and reduced price list. 
Missouri Poultry Farms, Columbia, Mo. 




T GlvlN et tor b nve WEDDING RING 

names of your neighbors and ten cents 
to pay postage &c. 

Gem City Supply Co., QUINCY, ILL* 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 11 




m 



mm 



$10,000 Bank Gua 



flip 

19 year old Samle Ross, Hackensack, 
N.J., who won $5,000 in a former 
Reefer Contest. 



1 



$rotmcerg anb Consumers 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

ro tha Public: 

E. J. Reefer has deposited 810,000 to 
this bank to be used in awarding all the 
prizes in- the "C" letter contest. 

This Bank guarantees that no part of 
this 510,000 will be used for any purpose 
until all the prizes have been paid by 
J. Reefer. 

Very truly yours, 

PRODUCERS AND CONSUMERS BANK 
_, f by Ben.1. B. Bowman. Treasuref.. 




Mrs. B. R. Young, of Girard, Pa., an- 
other winner of a $5,000 Reefer 
Contest Prize. 




$10,000 in Prizes! 



1st prizes 
2nd prizes 
3rd prizes 
4th prizes 
5th prizes 
6th to 10th prizes, each 

Every prize in every column will be awarded. 

40 prizes in all, totaling $10,000 will be paid. 



If no 


If b$I 


If B$2 


If a $5 


order is 


order is 


order is 


order is 


eent 


sent 


Bent 


■ent 


$50 


$250 


$600 


$5000 


35 


100 


250 


1250 


30 


60 


125 


500 


25 


50 


75 


375 


15 


35 


50 


250 


10 


25 


40 


100 



OBSERVE THESE RULES: 

1 — Any one excepting our employees and 
their relatives may enter this contest. 
There is no entrance fee of any kind. 

2— AH word lists must be received 
through the mail by E. J. Reefer, 9th & 
Spruce Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. and en- 
velopes must be postmarked by po9t 
ofSce closing time, February 15, 1923. 

3— Contestants who have Bent lists or 
orders before February 16th will be quali- 
fied for the higher prizes provided orders 
are received through the mail, post- 
marked on or before February 28tn. 

4— Only English words will be counted. 
Obsolete, hyphenated or compound words 
will not be counted. Only the singular or 
the plural of a word may be used, but 
both singular and plural will not count. 
Each article or object can be given only 
one name. Single words made up of two 
separate words or objects, such as tea- 
spoon, teapot, or teatime will not count. 
Webster's International Dictionary will 
be the final authority. Where several 
synonyms are equally applicable to an 
object shown in the picture, a person 
submitting any one of such Bynonyms 
will be given credit for one word only. 

5— The largest list of words which cor- 
rectly name visible objects beginning with 
the letter will receive first prize, 
and so on down the list of prizes. The 
winning list will be made up from among 
the words submitted by the contestants, 
and not controlled by any predetermined 
list of words selected by the judges as 
being the "correct" or "master'* list. 

6— For each wrong word a percentage 



will be deducted from the total namcer 
of correct words. 

7- -Two or more people may co-operate 
in answering the puzzle. However, only 
one prize will be given to any one house- 
hold or any one group. 

8— You must use only one side of paper. 
You must number each page and object in 
a consecutive rotation. Your full name and 
address must be written on each page in 
the upper right hand corner. An enlarged 
picture will be furnished free upon 
request. 

9 — The final decision will be made by 
three judges entirely Independent of and 
having no connection whatever with the 
E. J. Reefer Company. They will judge 
the answers submitted and award the 
prizes at the end of the contest. Each 
participant entering this contest agrees 
to accept the decision of the judges as 
final and conclusive, without argument or 
question. All answers will receive full 
consideration, whether or not merchan- 
dise is purchased. At the close of the 
contest, when all lists have been graded, 
the lists winning first prize and correct 
list determined by the judges and the 
names of the prize winners will be pub* 
lished and a copy of such list and prize 
winners'names and addresses will be sent 
upon request to any participant who sends 
us a self-addressed, stamped envelope. 

10— An additianal prize of not over $600 
for promptness, 09 specified above, will 
be awarded, 

11— In case of ties for any prize offered, 
each tying contestant will receive full 
amount of the prize so tied for. 



How Many Objects in This 
Picture Can You Find Begin- 
ning with the Letter "C" 

There is Cap, Cornet, Cane. How many "more can 
you find? Write them down and send them in as soon 
as possible. See how easy it is. Everything is in plain 
sight. No need to turn the picture upside down. This 
is a game of skill. Effort and perseverence will win. 

Costs Nothing to Try- 

If you send in your list of "C" words and the judges 
decide your list is the largest which correctly names 
the visible objects beginning with "C". they will 
award you first prize in whatever column you qualify. 
If your list is second best list, they will award you 
one of the second prizes, etc Get started right nowl 

Win the $5000 Prize! 

You do not have to buy anything to 
enter this contest and win a prize I 
If the lodges decide yoor list of "C" words le _ A 
beat and you have not ordered anything, yon will V?f| 
wi» first prize of - - - - - . . "PW 

If yon send in a $1.00 order for either Washing tb*% B? A 

Tablets or "More Eggs" Tonie, and yonr list is 9/t?«)lf 

awarded first prize, you win • • - 

If yon send in a $2.00 order for either prod- ^ftfi All 

Oct. and yoor list wins first prize, yon get «f» W V 

Bat If yon send In a J5 order for either prod- d!CAAA 

Oct and yoa are awarded first prize, yon get ipuVUU 
(Study the Prize List) 

Besides there are 36 other cash prizes. Every prize in every column 
will be awarded. 40 prizes in all, totaling $10,000 will be paid. 
Second prize in column 4 is $1,250. Third prize $500, etc. Just think 
of it — 40 chances for you to win. 

$600 Extra for Promptness 

Your word list may be mailed any time up to Feb. 15, but for every 
day before Feb. 15 that your order is received, a special prize of $10 
for each day (not exceeding $600) will be added if you win the $5,000 
prize. Send order today and word list later. 

IVitl All Ynil f an t Be sure to send your orders for $5 

r "V *VU Vrtll. worthof WashingTabletsor"More 
Eggs" Tonic if you wish to qualify your list of words for the $5,000 
first prize and the other prizes in the 4th column of the prize list. 
Don't delay sending in your order. Get the extra prize for prompt- 
ness. Send your order today. 

fZnnrlc Ymi Clot Either one of these products may be 
UUOUA * ou Vier ordered t0 qua iif y in this contest, but 
combination orders will not be accepted. 

"More Eggs" 

A Wonderful Poultry Tonic 

A scientific poultry tonic, need by half million poultry raisers with great success 
to increase egg production during Fall and Winter. A highly concentrated pre- 
paration. Makes rich, red blood. Helpa the digestive apparatus. Sharpens 
the appetite and helps prepare for healthy egg production. Does not contain one 

§ article of bran, or grit, or any filler. 100% concentrate. Contains every fngre- 
ient my vast experience tells me is needed to make a remarkable poultry tonic. 



Two $1.00 
packages. 
Prepaid . 



$5 



poultry t 
Economy size, or 
20 — $1.00 pack- 
repaid . XfJfiw ages. Prepaid . 

Take all the back-breaking work oat 
of washday. One tablet to a tub of 
water. Soak clothes and rinse. So 
Wash dirtiest clothes with only 16 minutes work. 

Economy size, Jumbo size. Game as  7 large $1 packages . ipiw 



gT» f Five $100 gt*£% 

Washing Tablets 

9 l 

$2 

Start NOW! 



Send In your order today. Think 
of the extra prize money for 

gromptness I Qualify for the 
IggeBt prizes. $60 or $6000 — 
which do you want t 



FRE£ 



Everyone, sending for a large size picture 
will receive, fully prepaid, a sample pack- 
age of a world famous, exquisitely 
scented, high priced Complexion Powder. 
Send for it today. 



Ef HaaSam 9th and Spruce Streets 

• **• nccSert Dept e0 98 Philadelphia, Pa. 
- No goods bought during this contest are subject to exchange, refund or approval. No C. 0. D. — — — — — — 



Page Number 12 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Correct Type and Color of 

RHODE ISLAND 

REDS 



REMARKABLE BOOK 

"Blue Ribbon Reds" 

Sent Free To Everybody 
Who Mails Coupon Below 

Most remarkable book on R. I. Reds ever 
published. A book no breeder of Reds or 
anyone planning to raise Reds can afford 
to be without. 

By means of the most remarkable set of 
Rhode Island Red illustrations ever pro- 
duced, W. H. Card, secretary of the Rhode 
Island Red Club, and the greatest living 
authority on REDS, in "BLUE RIBBON 
REDS," shows in a way so simple that every 
beginner can understand what constitutes 
the correct type and color of Rhode Island 
Reds. There are twelve drawings illustrating type 
and fourteen illustrating color. These drawings 
show the ideal Reds, both male and female, as well 
as the various shape and color defects most com- 
monly found. Mr. Card also points out whichde- 
fects are serious and which are of only minor 
importance. 

Hereare af ew of the many subjects in 

"Blue Ribbon Reds » 

— An A-B-C Course in Judging Rhode Island Reds 

(in five lessons) 
— How Rhode Island Reds Originated 
— Mating Rhode Island Reds for Color and Shape 
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Rhode Island Reds 
—How to Breed ap an E?g Laying Strain 
—How to Coll Rhode Island Reds 
—How to Prepare Rhode Island Reds for the 

Show Room 

—Which is the Correct Rhode bland Red Color 
—Disqualifications —Standard Weights 

—Feeding Poultry at All Ages — Linebreeding 
— How to Treat Sick Fowls 
—How to Get Rid of Lice and Mites 
—How to Build Poultry Houses and Equipment. 
Special Illustrated Features 

A picture of Rhode Island Reds in natural colors, 
suitable for framing, the latest and best everpub- 
lished, copyrighted 1919. Pictures of many prize 
winning Reds at National Shows— Description of 
a common sense window for fresh air poultry 
hoases and detailed illustrations made from blue 
prints— How to build a practical poultry house for 
a small flock of chickens — How to make a good 
home-made trapnest. 

"BLUE RIBBON REDS" is a veritable encyclo- 
pedia of useful poultry information. Cost $3,000 to 
produce. You must Bee a copy of this book to 
appreciate i*s value. Given absolutely FREE with 
3-year subscription to the Rhode Island Red Journal. 

Rhode Island Red Journal 

the official organ of the Rhode Island Red Club of 
America. Published monthly, et 60c per year, 
3 years SI. 00. It is tho "Red Breeders' Bible." 
Those who know it say they would not be without 
it for $5 per year. It keeps you in touch with all the 
leading breeders of Reds and 
keeps you posted on every- 
thing pertaining to Rhode 
, Island Reds. It tells how to 
make bit? money with them. 
, Don't lay this advertise- 
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coupon right now. Pin 
a dollar bill to it. Mail 
I at our risk. Book and 
i Journal will start at 
i once. 




RHODE ISLAND RED JOURNAL 

1013 Democrat Bldg., Waverly, Iowa 



Mail This Coupon NOW 



/| Rhode Island Red Journal 
1013 Democrat Bldg., Waverly, la. 
Gentlemen:— I have enclosed Sl.OO. Send me 
your FREE BOOK, "Slue Ribbon Red..' and 
enter my name for a 3-year subscription to the 
Rhode Island Red Journal. Please send book 
and paper at once. 



Name . 



Street orR. F. D. No 

Town State 



When writing advertisers please mention 
tbls paper. 




)TrD oca 




This Department is conducted for 
the benefit of the readers of POUL- 
TRY KEEPER and we will be 
pleased to answer any question com- 
ing within the scope of the Depart- 
ment or a personal reply may be had 
by enclosing a two cent stamp. 



F. Raymond Benson 



® 



How Large a Farm. 

I am going to get into the poultry game and 
would like to know how many acres I will 
need to make a good living for my family, 
consisting of wife, two children and myself? 
Can vou advise me regarding this matter? 

J. P., Illinois. 

The question of the size of a poul- 
try farm depends on the number of 
fowls kept and that depends on how 
much you can make them pay per 
head. So after all the whole mat- 
ter resolves into the personal fitness. 
Some breeders have trouble making 
one dollar per head while others 
seem to make five dollars with ease. 
I would buy sufficient ground to al- 
low for growth. Being cramped for 
room is a decided drawback. If you 
will go into details as to your plans 
and where you expect to locate we 
might be able to give you more help. 



Bruised Fruit. 

Will wind fall fruit do alright for poultry? 
We have a lot and thought maybe we could 
feed it to advantage. 

G. K. L. , Xew York. 

The fowls might survive the eating 
of such fruit but it is not to be 
recommended. Fresh fruit would be 
alright but bruised fruit which has 
entered into the process of decay is 
not very good food for poultry. 



Wants Oat Sprouter. 

I have seen an ad of the 



Oat 

Sprouter and would like to know if you con- 
sider it a good one? Would you buv it? 

E. E. T., Ohio. 

The Oat Sprouter you speak of is 
alright and we would not hesitate 
to buy one if we needed it. It is 
made by a reliable firm. 



Several Questions. 

1. Do you think the Anconas are as good 
layers as the White Leghorns? 

2. Which will cost the least to feed? 

3. How about house room needed? How do 
they compare? 

4. Are the Camplnes in the same class? 

5. What about this talk that Leghorns are 
hard to sell as market fowls? Is it true? 

6. Which breed would you suggest I start 
with having in mind that my space is lim- 
ited and yet I want to get the maximum out of 
the birds. Keep In mind I am after eggs 
more than fancy. 

E. S. ., Wisconsin. 

1. There are some Anconas that 
are very good layers but as a whole 
they have not been pushed as hard 
as the Leghorns and as a result are 
not as well known as layers. Either 
breed will lay well if you get a lay- 
ing strain and feed properly. 

2. I doubt if there is much dif- 
ference on this point. Either one 
will eat much less than the Rocks, 
Reds or 'Dottes. 

3. The Leghorn and Ancona are 
about the same in this respect. 

4. I assume that you refer to the 
cost of feed and house room needed 
and would say that they are nearly 
the same as (the Leghorns and An- 
conas in this matter. 

5. There is some truth in the 
matter but the commission merch- 



ants are quite likely to blame as 
they buy the small fowls cheaper but 
do not sell them again at a corres- 
ponding price. This condition has 
not made for friendship among the 
breeders of small fowls as one can 
readily see. The Leghorn breeders 
are getting aroused and we antici- 
pate that they will breed a fowl 
which will be such a good market 
fowl that they will bring a premium 
in years to come. 

6. Personally we believe you 
would find a more ready sale for 
the Leghorns or Anconas. I believe 
the Anconas can be raised with much 
more ease than the Leghorns but 
this may be because I have handled 
them more. The smaller breeds are 
suitable for the Back Lotter and Lit- 
tle Lander, especially where eggs is 
the main product desired. 



To Change Roosters. 

Is it advisable for me to keep the roosters 
of my own flock or to change? I keep Ehode 
Island Reds. D. S., Tennessee. 

The danger in keeping your own 
roosters would be that you would be 
inbreeding and eventually it would 
have a tendency to ruin the flock 
vigor. Personally I like to change 
often enough to keep the health and 
vitality up to par. Butt always make 
sure that the males you get are 
healthy, strong and full of pep. It 



We want you to try this new and better Coal 
Tar Disinfectant — the only one made in solid 
form— 

CoMejfs NOX 

Solidified Disinfectant 

Just dissolve one little cube of Conkey's 
Nox in a gallon of warm water and you have 
a gallon of Disinfecting Solution all ready 
for use. You pay nothing for bottles, barrels 
or cans; pay no freight on heavy liquid; you 
have no leaking or breaking. 

Destroys Lice, Mites, Ticks 

In combating poultry mites and similar uses, 
Conkey's Nox is undoubtedly the most efficient 
coal tar preparation known to science at the 
present time. It should be used constantly for 
cleansing and disinfecting coops, nests, roosts, 
incubators, brooders, fountains, etc. 
Use Conkey's Nox once and you will prefer it 
to any other form of Disinfectant, Extermina- 
tor or Germicide. Send 10c, coin or stamps, 
for sample package containing 2 cubes, for 
making 2 gallons. Circular free. 

THE C. E. CON KEY CO. 
6542 Broadway Cleveland, Ohio 

THE C. E. CONKEY CO. 

6542 Broadway, Cleveland, Ohio 

Enclosed find 10 centg. Send me postpaid sample of 
Conkey'3 NOX for 2 gallons of Disinfectant. 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 13 



is the strong male which keeps the 
flock up to par. 



Crooked Bill. 

I have a young Rhode Island cockerel which 
is alright except that he has a crooked bill. 
Would you advise breeding from him or not? 

G. W. M., New Jersey. 

I do not think that this cockerel 
would transmit this deformity but 
probably he is weak in some other 
section which is not so noticeable. 
There is a grave danger that he 
would not be able to eait properliy, 
hence would not get the proper nour- 
ishment and could not keep up the 
vigor needed to head a breeding 
pen. I would not use such a fowl. 



Liver Trouble. 

I have about 159 Barred Rock pullets and 
they have teen laying and seemed alright. A 
few days ago one got sick and died and now 
another is sick. I opened the one and found 
the liver much enlarged and soft. I liave 
given as a mash 10O pounds each of bran, 
middlings, mill and meat scraps. As a scratch 
I have used cracked corn and oats. Can you 
tell me what is the matter and a remedy? 

In the first place I would give the 
flock a treatment of Epsom salts at 
the rate of one pound to each 100 
fowls. Give it in the drinking wa- 
ter. Then give the affected fowls 
a good tonic. If you have nothing 
better at hand you might give ten 
drops of nux vomica in a pint of 
drinking water. Change your ration 
to the following: For scratch feed 
use one part of wheat, oats and two 
parts of cracked corn, fed in deep 
litter to induce exercise. For mash 
use equal parts of bran, shorts, corn 
meal and meat scraps. All to be by 
weight. Charcoal does much towards 
keeping the digestion in good shape 
and we suggest that you provide it 
in hoppers. 



Roofing or Shingles. 

I am about to build a new poultry house 
and wish to know if roofing is as good as 
shingles. E. R. M., Illinois. 

Roofing is cheaper and usually 
considered satisfactory. We have 
found that roofing is better than 
shingles on a flat roof but for a roof 
with much pitch the composition 
shingles are the best, if price is no 
consideration. 



Heating the Poultry House. 

I live in the North where the winters get 
mighty cold. It gets so blooming cold that 
the hens go on a strike (which is quite popular 
now days) and refuse to lay. Once in awhile 
they freeze to death and I have been wondering 
about heating the hen house and trying to 
overcome all this trouble. AVhat do you say 
about such a proposition? 

E. K. L., North Dakota. 

Any one who figures that he can 
afford to heat a hen house at the 
price of coal, must be a very rich 
man indeed. We do not think you 
can afford to do it. Try providing 
more ventilation and deeper litter 
We would give whole corn just be- 
fore roosting time. We have had 
letters from those who have it thirty 
and forty below zero and they report 
good results, without artificial heat. 





If Not, 
Today 




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Sol -Hot Brooder 
Oil Burning Stove. 




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brooder heater will go out and thus lose a lot of your 
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H. M. SHEER COMPANY 

Dept. 28 Quincy, Illinois 



BALLARD'S SUPREME WHITE ROCKS 

Hare mated some fine pens for the egg trade from my Champion winners. Mating list on request. 
P. W. BALLARD, GALESBURG, ILL. 



HORNER'S PEDIGREED S. C. REDS 

We are now ready to furnish you with blue ribbon cockerels 

and pullets for early show. 
ERNEST G. HORNER, R. 7, Box 30, QUINCY. ILL. 



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Plans for the NATIONAL are under way and they include some 
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America. Club Meets. Good Specials. Best of Everything. For 
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D. E. HALE, Sec'y., 349 West 65th Street, CHICAGO 



Page Number 14 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



_>-£*»V S e i KNOWN FROM 

. yf %T VJL ROO TE *T yBOXfgl 




rHenskufLite 



Dc»'t ke«p boarders any longer. Make 
every hen lay allwinterjustlike pure- 
breds in spring. This book tells how. 
Contains Formula for Standard Egg 
Producer which made 30 scrub culls 
produce SB eggs par day all winter. 
Easy to make at home. Illustration 
shows actual results before and after 
feeding standard Egg Pr oducer. Book 
^ - . contains 37 formulas f 
ihU for mash and scratch ■ 

* f aedsi and dozens of 
money making plans. Tells 
how to feed all poultry of all 

ures for all purposes, Sold lost 
season for $1.00. C/ven FREE 
with 3 year subscription to 

Western Poultry Journal 

Monthly. 50c yr.; 3 yrs. SI. Magazine so good 

every reader of this paper will want It. Contains exact Infor- 
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Westers Poultry Journal; 2213 DtmocratBldg.,Waverly, la. 




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AGENCY 
Chicago, 111. 



When to Cull. 

We hear a lot about culling: but so far I 
have never heard anyone say just what time 
of the year was the be6t time to cull the 
flock. Will you tell us and other readers 
what you think Is the best time to cull? 

F. G. H., Wisconsin. 

The best time to cull is when you 
see a fowl which should be taken 
from the flock. It matters but lit- 
tle what time of the year it may be, 
the main thing is to get rid of the 
fowl the moment you notice that it 
is a cull. Usually farm flocks are 
culled in the fall, after the young 
stock has matured but we favor sell- 
ing all surplus birds after the breed- 
ing season is over and then to cull 
the flock of youngsters in the fall. 
The main thing is to cull and cull 

hard. 

Fireless Water Fountain. 

I seen the Water Fountain is 

advertised in POULTRY KEEPER and I want 
to know if it is alright. Will it keep the 
water from freezing? A. D., Iowa. 

It will keep the water warm and 
prove very useful and I am sure 
would prove a good investment for 
you. It is wonderful how such a 
fountain will increase the egg yield. 
Warm water is quite essential in win- 
ter and such a fountain provides it 
with no danger as it does not have 
a lamp. We have experimented with 
this idea in a fountain and never had 
any trouble in zero weather and that 
is a good test. 



I have been trying to buy a cockerel and 
thought that $15 ought to buy a good one. 
What do you think about it? Can you tell 
me where I can buy a good Rhode Island Red 
bird? T. J. H., Missouri. 

Wants a Cockerel 

You should get a good breeding 
bird for $15. You will not get a 
show specimen but just a good av- 
erage breeding bird. I cannot give 
addresses through these columns. 
Send a stamp and I will give you 
names of breeders. 



Ready Built Hen House. 

What is your idea of the ready built hen 
houses that we see advertised? Are they 
really good buildings? 

U. K. L., Kentucky. 

There are good and bad ready 
built hen houses just the same as 
is the case with every article on the 
market. If you buy from a reliable 
concern you will get a good house 
but be sure thai it is of a size and 
so arranged to meet your needs. 
Many of the houses on the market 
are not well adapted to general 
needs. We may see more of these 
houses in use as time passes owing 
to the extremely high prices which 
the lumber concerns are getting for 
their materials. It would almost 
seem as if the Government should 
take steps to regulate the price of 
such a basic material as lumber and 
if the prices remain high we may see 
just such an event. 



What Is Peat Litter 

Will you tell us what peat litter Is and 
whether It is any good? 

E. R. C, Wisconsin. 

Peat litter is peat. That is the 
sum and size of the matter. It is 
said to be very useful but most poul- 
trymen have found it cheaper to use 
good, clean straw. Peat is said to 
absorb much moisture and odors and 
proves useful in that way but we 
trust that the price will soon be down 
to a place where the matter may be 
given a general trial by the poultry 
fraternity. 



Why Colds. 

Can you tell me why it is that there is us- 
ually a lot of trouble with colds during the 
fall? E. H. H., Kansas. 

It is seldom that one is bothered 
with fall colds when proper attention 
has been given to ventilation, dry 
houses, plenty of roosting room. Over 
crowding, damp quarters and lack of 
fresh air is a fertile cause of colds. 
Attention to these matters will go a 
long ways in overcoming the trouble. 



Mighty few widows are ever able 
to give their children a proper educa- 
tion — unless the father left behind 
him a generous life insurace policy. 



TURKEYS: THEIR CARE AND MANAGEMENT 



Some of the most successful breeders and com- 
mercial growers In the country tell of the 
methods by which they have accomplished their 
successes, and what they have done others also 
can do. If you raise turkeys In any number, 
this book will be worth many times Its price 
to you. 

Beautifully Illustrated, one color plate, 96 
pages, 9 by 12 Inches. Price 75c, postpaid. 
Address Poultry Keeper, Oulncy, Illinois. 



SUCCESSFUL BACK- YARD POULTRY 
KEEPING 



A new one just off the press. Tells every- 
thing you need to know about poultry keeping 
on a small scale to Insure success. The largest, 
most complete and down-to-date book on the 
subject ever published. Will turn failure into 
success and is an invaluable guide to any be- 
ginner. 

Every person who Is keeping fowls on a 
small scale or is planning to do so — everyone 
who wants to learn about the latest practical 
methods adapted to back-yard conditions — will 
want this big, truly helpful book. Every im- 
portant phase of the subject is covered In the 
seventeen chapters contained within Its pages, 
from the laying out of the plant to the use of 
artificial illumination — the new method that 
positively doubles and more than doubles fall 
and winter production. Whether you are In- 
terested in poultry keeping simply to produce 
a supply of eggs for home use or as a money- 
making side line, you need this practical down- 
to-date book. 

"Successful Back- Yard Poultry Keeping" 
contains 104 pages, 8% by 12 inches, over 100 
illustrations and a beautiful three-color art cover 
by Schilling. Price $1.00, postpaid. Address, 
Poultry Keeper, Qulncy, niinoiB. 




>UCKEYE Poultry Rais- 

, ing Equipment has again 
proven its superiority. 
Three quarters of a million users have again 
demonstrated its wonderful efficiency, its 
reliability and its remarkable economy, in 
another season of success. 

Ask your agricultural college, experiment sta- 
tion or county agent about Buckeye Incuba- 
tors and Brooders. See them at your 
dealer's, or write far Buckeye catalogs. 

The Buckeye Incubator Co. 
115 Euclid Avenue 

Springfield 
Ohio 





THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 15 




A Splendid Tribute 

To 

Regal Dorcas White Wyandottes 

From a prominent New England Breeder 



1890 EDGEWOOD FARM 1920 

Geo. H. Bodfish & Co. 
Breeders of White "Wyandottes 

West Barnstable, Mass., May. 20, 1922. 
John S. Martin, Port Dover, Ont. 

Dear Sir: Words cannot express my admiration and ap- 
preciation of what you have done for the White Wyandottes 
as a breed, in bringing the Regal Dorcas strain to its present 
high state of perfection. For hardiness, early maturity, 
heavy layers of good sized eggs, combined with standard re- 
quirements, they stand today without a rival. white 

For over thirty years I have bred and exhibited White 
Wyandottes and have bought either eggs or stock of many 
of the White Wyandotte breeders throughout the country and 
never had any birds to equal the Begal Strain. I have had 
some of the heavy weights, also some of the creepers, which 
averaged from eighty to ninety eggs per year per pen, and 
small eggs at that. I have Dorcas pullets hatched last June 
laying eggs averaging 25 ounces per dozen as taken from the 
nest My five year old Dorcas hen commenced to lay the 
4th of last December and is still laying without showing any 
signs of becoming broody. Tills hen comes as near to Stand- 
ard requirements as any hen I ever owned. 

Yours truly, 
(Signed) GEO. H. BODFISH. 



To receive such a letter from a veteran breeder of 
over 30 years standing should be convincing evidence 
that the Regal Dorcas strain is the ideal fowl. They are 
wonderful layers of rich brown eggs, unsurpassed as a 
profitable table fowl and able to get into the show room 
and come home with the blue ribbons. What more could 
be desired? 



3,000 matured or rapidly maturing cockerels and 
pullets of royal lineage ready for shipping on short notice. 

2,000 Selected Cocks and Hens, tested breeders at 
Special Prices. 

200 acres devoted to White Wyandottes. 

Free — Send for illustrated Catalogue and Fall Bul- 
letin, telling all about my special offerings for the next 
Sixty days. 

JOHN S. MARTTJV Box 408, Port Dover, Ont. Can. 



POULTRY HOUSE LOCATION 



In poultry raising one of the first 
considerations is a good location for 
the house. We have found it best 
to pick a high spot so that there will 
be good drainage away from the 
house, as nothing is harder on the 
health of the fowls than dampness. 

Light, sandy soil is preferable to 
heavy clay, as it dries out quicker 
and is easier to keep clean and fresh. 
Ground with a southern slope pro- 
vides the best ranging conditions. 
The house should in all cases face 
the south or southeast, so as to get 
as much sunshine as possible. 

It is not always necessary to have 
elaborate and expensive houses, but 
it is quite important that every 
house be built so as to protect the 
fowls from cold winds and rain. The 
roosting quarters or sleeping section 
of the house should be so arranged 
that the fowls can be kept warm 
enough that their combs will not 
freeze, as a hen will not lay when 
suffering from frost bite. — S. P. 



MAKE TIP A CLUB 



Make up a club of your own, choosing the 
papers or magazines you want to take. Write 
and let me quote a special cut price. I can 
save you considerable money on your subscrip- 
tions. A. Otis Arnold, Quincy, Illinois. 



THE PLYMOUTH ROCKS 



By William C. Denny 



This complete breed book explains standard 
requirements and tells how to select, mate and 
exhibit winners in all varieties. Subjects of 
special importance to Plymouth Rock breeders, 
such as how to correct barring in Barred 
Rocks. "Stay-white" plumage in White Rocks, 
correct uniform color in Buffs, double mating, 
line breeding, strain building, etc., all are 
plainly and fully treated. 

Well illustrated, Including three color plates, 
144 pages, 9 by 12 Inches. Price $1.00 postpaid. 
Address Poultry Keeper, Quincy, Illinois. 




'A Hatch 



ilBi 



BoJly 



November Chicks for Winter Meat and High -Priced Broilers 

GREAT MONEY IN BROILERS FROM NOVEMBER CHICKS 

We pay the postage, guarantee 95 per cent live arrival 
and send FEED FREE with each order. 

S. C. White, S. C. Brown, S. C. Buff, and R. C. Brown Leghorns, 50 for $7.50; 100 for $14.00; 500 
for $65. Barred and White Rocks, R. C. and S. C. R. I. Reds, Buff Orpingtons, S. C. Black Min- 
orcas, Anconas, 50 for $9; 100, $17; 500 for $80. Silver Laced Wyandottes, $10 for 50; $19 a 100. 
White Wyandottes, $10 for 50; $19 a 100; $85 for 500. Light Brahnias, $11 for 50; $21 a 100. 
Broiler chicks same as Leghorns. Catalogue free. 

NABOB HATCHERIES, dept. ie, gambier, ohio 



EASY WAY TO GET EGGS 

Feed "OCULTJM," the Scientific Germicide only ONE drop a day per hen. It has 
made MORE eggs all over the U. S. for 15 years— often doubling them. It is cheap. 
Sample (150 feeds) 10c. "OCULTJM" made 48 hens jump from 8 to 42 eggs a day. H. C. 
Miller, Judge, A. P. Ass'n. Akron, O., ask him. It quickly relieves Roup and other germ 
troubles. Bradley, Fishel and other fanciers praise it. This Journal O. K.'s it. Bottles 
50c and $1, postpaid. GUARANTEED. BOOKLET FREE. 

The "OCULUM" Co. Box S. SALEM, VA. 

Dealers Handle. Agents Wanted. 



Don't Hatch Weakand Wobbly Chicks 



With Cheap Incubators 

A cheap uncertain incubator means death to chickens and profits. Remember it 
is not how many you hatch that counts, but how many you raise. 

Queen Incubators 

Hatch Strong, Healthy Chicks That Live and Grow 

One of our Minnesota dealers writeB: "We have sold Queen Incubators and 
Brooders for the last six years and they have given our customers entire satis- 
faction The farmers all consider the Queen Incubator as standard and at auc- 
tion sales, where it is almost impossible to get a bid of any kind on the average 
second hand incubator, the Queen always brings a good price, regardless of its 
outside appearance." . . , .. . . 

A Queen costs but little more than the cheap machine and the extra chicks that 
live and gTow soon pay the difference. Write for Free Book. 
QUEEN INCUBATOR CO.. IJNCOUf NEBRASKA 




Page Number 16 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 




A wonderful help 
to poultry raisers! 

You must send right away for your 
copy of the new Purina Poultry 
Book — 100 pages crammed full of 
latest information on poultry rais- 
ing. Tells why half the 600 million 
U. S. eggs set each year fail to 
hatch. What the best authorities 
have learned about vitamins and 
egg laying, electric lighting, and 
improved methods of culling. Lat- 
est helps on care of poultry from 
incubation to marketing. Blanks 
for financial and egg records. Get 
the book with our compliments. 

Purina Mills, 803 Gratiot St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Yes. send alone my copy of the Purina Poultry Book, 
without cost to me. 

Name 

City 

St. or R.F.D 

State 



LEG BANDS 

All guaranteed-Any size ft 
ALUMINUM BANDS ~ 
with raised figures, 
price postpaid, 10-15c, 
25-25C, 50-35c, 100-60c. 
ECONOMY Colored 

ceUuloid with 
' Any Color, 





aluminum back, 
two large black num- 
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25-oOc, 50-SOc, 100-$1.50. 
Makers of 25 different styles of 

LEG & WING- bands. 
The National Poultry Band Co. 
Send for catalog. Newport, Ky. 



Intensive Poultry Keeping 

By F. Raymond Benson 
(Continued from last issue) 



Each year we receive dozens of 
letters asking if intensive poultry 
keeping really pays. The best proof 
that we can give is some actual ex- 
periences and we have decided to 
quote from a few letters of readers 
of POULTRY KEEPER and you can 
judge for yourself whether there is 
anything to the poultry business. Mr. 
O. C. Shalley, of Pennsylvania will 
be the first witness. Let us hear his 
testimony. Mr. Shalley has a coop 
6x8 feet with a back wall of 5 Vs 
feet and 7 feet in front. He has no 
run at all and if this is not intensive 
we never saw such. Beginning with 
November 1st he kept a record of 13 
pullets. Now Mr. S. will testify: 
"These pullets laid 2406 eggs from 
November 1st 1919 to October 31, 
1920. These pullets consumed feed 
to the amount of $76.52 during that - 
year and you will agree that feed 
was high in price and poor in qual- 
ity. I sold most of my eggs to 
neighbors with the exception of nine 
settings for which I received $12 and 
$115.92 for the market eggs. My 
receipts for the year were $143.92 
and expenses $76.52 leaving a gain 
of $67.40 or a profit of $5.18 per 
hen. Of course the cost of the fowls 
should be considered and they cost 
me $17. I think this is not so bad 
for a back-lotter with no experience 
with chickens, but will say that it 
pays to buy your stock from one who 
has learned the poultry game." This 
is indeed a very fine report and we 
know our readers will appreciate it. 
As further evidence let us hear from 
G. H. G. up in Wisconsin. The re- 
port is so encouraging we wish the 
writer had sent his full name. "I 
had 12 Single Comb Rhode Island 
Reds pullets that started to lay Dec. 
19, 1920 and until Dec. 19, 1921 
they laid 204 6 eggs which brought 
$55.23. The feed cost $25 besides 
the table scraps. The profit was 




Will Supply 40 Hens or Less 

Delivered fully prepaid anywhere in a >- 
the U. S. by parceJ post for only *pO»(fD 

This Egg-Getter is the best proposition made in a Vapor Bath Grain 
Sprouter. Devised by W. H. Wlonroa, the inventor of the first grain 
sprouter, and offered by the Close- To-Nature Company, the oldest sprouter 
manufacturers in the C. S., you know it has got to be all right. 

It is 13 inches square by 28 high and holds 10 to 12 Quarts dry grain, — 
a capacity as large as some manufacturers rate for 100 hens. Made of gal- 
vanized sheet steel strengthened by a frame-work of cypress. Has four trays 
which may be divided into 4, 6 or 8 compartments with movable partitions. 
Shipped complete with lamp, thermometer, partitions, directions. 

Use it anywhere — pretty enough for the bay window with the flowers. 

Why Waste Your Money 

on a lampless sprouter that produces the poorest grade of 
slow-sprouting, wiry, tough oats when you can now get a 
genuine vapor-bath sprouter that makes the highest grade 
of quickly sprouted, snappy, succulent sprouts that the hens 
relish so highly "that they eat great quantities and respond 
with the big Increase in eggs? 

Order From This Advertisement 

and your sprouter goes out at once by insured parcel post. 

Ask Us 

about "Sprouted Oats and Eggs" and our great line of 
Sprouters from a few hens to 1,000: and the splendid 
Close-To-IMature Incubators, Stove Brooders, Outdoor 
Brooders, etc. 

CLOSE-TO-NATURE COMPANY 

20 FRONT STREET COLFAX. IOWA \ 



8ent same day 
by prepaid 
parcel post 




$30.23. I sold them for about what 
they cost me so the profit is net." 
Who says that a few hens will not 
pay? These men have proven they 
will return profits. The next wit- 
ness will be from Chicago and any- 
one who has been to the Windy City 
knows what this man is up against 
for room and feed. Here is what 
Mr. R. E. Matson of Chicago has to 
say: "I will give my first year's ex- 
perience from my back yard flock 
that has a run 20x10. From Jan. 
1st, 1921 to Sept. 16th, 1921 I re- 
ceived from six pullets 85 V 2 dozen 
eggs. Then I bought six more hens 
making a total of 12 hens and from 
September 17th to December 31st, 
1921 I received 17% dozen eggs, 
making a total of 103 dozen for the 
year. My 12 hens and one rooster 
cost me $23.42 and the feed was 
$33.13 making a total outlay of 
$56.55. I sold eggs to the amount 
of $61.80, sold pullets for $31.68. 
My total income was $93.48 and 
when you deduct the cost I still have 
$36.93 profit." This is a profit of 
a trifle more than $3 per hen and 
we would like to know where you 
can invest money which will do bet- 
ter. We hope Mr. Matson will favor 
us with a report again next year. A 
few months ago a reader of POUL- 
TRY KEEPER wrote to the writer 
for advice using the Question and 
Answer Department. We found him 
to be a kindly gentleman and asked 
him to give us a report of his flock 
for a month or two and he has done 
so. This man was Mr. L. H. Grason 
of Illinois. "Received your reply to 
my letter and thank you very much 
for the information contained there- 
in. As per my promise I will give 
an extract from the records of my 
chickens for the months of March 
and April. For March I received 
102 5 eggs from 4 8 hens. Sold at 
25c per dozen and received $21.35 
My feed cost $8.55 leaving a profit 
of $12.70 or approximately 27c per 
bird. For April I received 1023 eggs 
from 4 6 hens which brought me 
$21.25. My feed bill was $10.80 
but I still have enough feed for a 
week or so. My profit for this 
month was $10.40. I feel rather 
good that you think my record war- 
rants recognition." This makes a 
profit for the two months of $23.10. 
If Mr. Grason could keep up this 
record for the balance of the year 
it would net him about $138.60 for 
the year. But owing to the fact that 
the lean months are to come he can 
hardly expect to meet that amount. 
However he is keeping his flock at 
a good profit and is getting a lot of 
fun out of it on the side. As we 
were writing this article M. R. M. 
Weston of Minnesota sent us his re- 
port and it is good enough that we 
are going to put it in right here. We 
take it that this is Mr. Weston's 
first year. He had ten hens to start 
1921 with and here is what he did: 
"The hens laid a total of 1971 eggs 
during the year. Eggs averaged 
41 1-3 cents per dozen and feed was 
high. The eggs brought me $67.38 
and deducting the feed bill of $16.75 
I have a net profit of $50.63. 
Scratch feed in morning, mash all 
the time, potato pealings and bran. 
Charcoal, oyster shell and grit before 
fowls at all times. Only a small 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 



Page Number 17 



yard and coop. Coop -white-washed 
inside and roosts painted with creo- 
sote." This is certainly an excellent 
report and still some sour-livered 
pessimist will tell you that poultry 
doesn't pay. Poultry does pay and 
the above testimonials from honest 
readers of POULTRY KEEPER like 
all of us tell us in plain figures what 
it pays in dollars and cents. 

Many start intensive poultry keep- 
ing with a small poultry house as 
did Mr. Shalley. Gradually it can 
be enlarged as the flock is increased. 
This plan involves less expense to 
start with and allows the poultry to 
build its own house, so to speak. 
There is a great opportunity for the 
intensive poultry farmer. The busi- 
ness will pay but it is necessary to 
have a small plot of ground, to know 
something about the business and 
to have a willingness to apply your- 
self. You may make more money 
than these gentlemen, perhaps it 
will be less but the main point is 
that it will pay you a profit and you 
can gradually let it grow under your 
fingers and in time it - will develop 
into a mighty good side line, one 
which will take you out of doors in- 
to the air and sunshine and pay you 
well in the end. 



THE BEST POULTRY NESTS 



When first in the poultry business 
we thought that nests made of scrap 
lumber or small boxes were satis- 
factory. Now we believe that the 
nests should be of smooth matched 
lumber with as few cracks and crev- 
ices as possible. They must never be 
nailed to the sides of the wall or 
beneath the dropping boards, but 
built in portable sections, so they 
can be easily carried from the house 
for sunning and spraying. 

When we used open nests in some 
of the houses the birds were con- 
stantly roosting on them or bother- 
ing the hens while they were laying. 
After several eggs had been laid in 
a nest another hen might decide to 
scratch around in the litter in the 
nest. This resulted in broken eggs 
and then it was only a short step to 
the egg eating habit. 

The best nests are built with a 
small track at the rear where the 
hens can enter. The eggs are re- 
moved by lowering a hinged door in 
front. These nests are slightly 
darkened and the hens hardly see 
the eggs that are laid. There is not 
much scratching in the litter in a 
darkened nest. If a soft shelled egg 
is laid and broken the danger of the 
hen eating it is reduced. 

The egg eating habit probably 
causes as much loss and discourage- 
ment as any habit or disease which 
troubles poultry keepers. The rem- 
edy is largely in prevention and this 
consists in building the right kind 
of nests. — R. G. K., Ind. 



THE WTAKD 0TTE3 
By J. H. Drevenstedt 



The standard qualities of all varieties of Wy- 
andottes are fully described and complete In- 
formation given on how to mate and breed, how 
to exhibit and judge them. Thousands of dol- 
lars were spent in research work, copy making, 
oil paintings, etc. No matter what variety of 
Wyandottes you breed you will find in this book 
Just the information yon need to bring success. 

Attractively illustrated, three color plates, 
160 pages, 9 by 13 Inches. Price $1.00, post- 
paid. Address Poultry Keeper, Qulncy, Illinois. 




Start 

-Your .. 
Pulbts and 
Moulted Hens 
to Laying 

You have had your summer's poultry- 
cares. 

Now is the time for you to cash in on 
eggs. 

Go after those dormant egg organs 
that moulting threw out of gear. 
Go after them with the "Old Reliable" 

Dr. Hess Poultry 

PAN-A-CE-A 

Pan-a-ce-a puts the egg organs to work. 

It starts the feed the egg way. 

Feed Pan-a-ce-a — then you will see red 
combs and red wattles. 

It brings back the song and scratch and 
cackle. 

It gives hens pep. 

It makes music in your poultry yard, 
That's when the eggs come. 

Tell your dealer how many hens you have. 

There's a right-size package for every flock. 

100 hens, the 12-lb. pkg. 200 hens, the 25-lb. pail 
60 hens, the 5-lb. pkg. 500 hens, the 100-lb. drum 
For fewer hens, there is a smaller package. 

GUARANTEED 

DR. HESS & CLARK Ashland, O. 



Dr.Hess Instant Louse Killer Kills Lice 




/ spent SO 
years in perfect* 
ing Pan-a-ce-a. 
Gilbert Hess 
MJ>., D.V.S, 



Lady Puritas 




Lady LayehT 

Laid 326 Efe&s 



PURITAS SPRINGS 
S. C. W. LEGHORNS 

The World's Greatest Layers 

Trapreested for over 10 years without missing 
one day. Every nest on. the farm is a trap- 
nest. We trapnest every day of every year. 

Reduced Prices Extended Until Not. 30 
START RIGHT— IT MEANS "SUCCESS'' 

If you are going to buy stock, get the best — then you can keep on going ahead. You can 
hatch a good many clucks next season from a small flock of heavy layers. See that your 
foundation stock is of the best and the offspring will be likewise. 'We have a grand lot of 
early hatched pedigreed Cockerels and Beady- to-Lay Pullets; they are beautiful birds and bred 
from heavy winter layers; also pedigreed hens. Alsu a fine lot of cockerels, Hens and Ready - 
to-Lay Pullets not individually pedigreed. WiU be glad to send you our instructive catalog 
and reduced price list. You will succeed with Puritas Springs stock. 

Puritas Springs Poultry Farm, Box Pill, Avon Lake, Ohio SUR&'i"* 




Page Number 18 



THE POULTRY KEEPER 




$g*52 per HEN 

— Official 
NET PROFIT! 

This is the exact record of 
the Ferris Pen at New Jersey 
Egg Contest. Double your 
profits with the White Leg- 
horns that are making history 
at such National Egg Contests 
as Illinois, Ark., Neb., Calif., Texas, Conn., Mich., 
etc. Get the benefit of 22 years breeding for eggs. 

TRAPNESTED- PEDIGREED 

Guaranteed by the world's largest Leghorn 
farms. Over 25,000 satisfied customers. Sat- 
isfaction or yourmoney back. Free instruction by our 
14 White Leghorn specialists assures your success. 

LAYING HENS 

Thousands of 
yearling hens from 
our choicest matings 
can now be spared 
at lowest prices in years. 

MATURE 

COCKERELS 

Get your breeding 
cockerels now. You 
can save nearly half 
and get first choice 
of thousands of our fin- 
est pedigreed cockerels. 

JUNE PULLETS 

Will lay in Nov. or 
Dec. and pay for 
themselves before 
spring. Our fall sale 
means a saving of 
40 per cent to you. 
Write for prices. 

EE GET THIS CATALOG 

A Post Card brings it— 
FREE. Get our special 
low prices. Increase 
your income. Make 
sure of a big winter 
egg-yield. Write today. 

GEO. 8. FERRIS 

909 Union Ave. Grand Rapids, Mich. 



LAYING PULLETS 

Make sure of a big 
winter egg-yield. 
Bargain prices on 
thousands of the fin- 
est ever raised. 

YEARLING MALES 

Now selling the 
males that have 
headed our best 
pens. Astonishing 
bargains on males 
that were not for sale at 
any price last spring. 

EGGS and CHICKS 

Big discounts on 
orders placed now 
for shipment next 
spring. We can also 
ship tall eggs and 
chicks from our 
southern farm. 




ILLINOIS STATE SHOW 



QUIXCY SHOW 



The 29th Annual State Show will 
be held in the brand new Armory 
at Danville, Illinois, on January 3 
to 7th, 1923. We believe it will 
offer more to the Poultry Breeder 
than any Show in Illinois. The list 
of prize cups will be large, and the 
Governor's Cup donated by Governor 
Small, one of the first presidents of 
our State Association, will be the 
most beautiful cup given away in 
many a day. It will be given for 
Best Display of the Show, all vari- 
eties competing and points to count. 
To compete for this fine prize, 10 
birds must be entered, one cock, one 
hen, one cockerel, one pullet and 
one pen. We will also give a 2 6 
Piece Set of Community Silver in a 
Mahogany Chest for Best Display in 
every variety that shows fifty speci- 
mens, birds in pen classes counting 
as two birds. We will charge no ad- 
mittance at the door, and will dis- 
tribute free, Official and Marked 
Catalogues. The Cornish, Buff, Or- 
pington, Ancona, Brown Leghorn, 
and the Rhode Island Red Club will 
have their State Meets there, and 
more clubs are figuring on meeting 
with us. The judges so far engaged 
are D. E. Hale, O. L. McCord, George 
A. Heyl, D. T. Heimlich, Jerome Le- 
land, W. G. Warnock and P. W. 
Ballard and more will be engaged if 
entries justify it. Catalogue will be 
ready by December first, write us at 
Quincy for same. 

A. D. SMITH, Sec'y. 



You Can Get More Eggs 

iilOver 90% 
of the Egg Is 
WATER 




Little Putnam Stove keeps water unfrozen— not hot. 



Give your fowls all the pure un- 
chilled water they can drink, and 
watch them shell out the eggs. 
One of my Little Putnam Stoves 

will keep enough water unfrozen to supply 
30 or 40 fowls, even in the coldest weather. 
This Stove holds 3 pints of oil — requires no 
attention except a monthly filling, due to 
my patented burner. It's fireproof and 
non-explosive — can be operated anywhere. 
You canrunitallwinteratacostof from 20 
to 30 cents. You'll get enough more eggs 
the first month to pay for it. 



Little PUTNAM Stove 

^ 0 0 can a ^ s0 ^ e use d as a heating unit for an easy-to- 

* make and easy-to-operate Oat Sprouter. Full 

P # - directions for making